PLATINUM2023

West African Vocational Schools

Fresno, CA   |  http://wavschools.org/

Mission

West African Vocational Schools is a Christian nonprofit based in the United States that works hand-in-hand with local leaders in Guinea-Bissau to offer job-training and economic development programs in one of the world's smallest and poorest countries. WAVS believes education and job training are long-term solutions to these challenges. The WAVS School is run by an all-Guinean staff and offers classes in computer basics, auto mechanics, welding, English and French – courses that are designed to help young men and women acquire marketable job skills. Our mission is to bring hope and opportunity to West African communities by working hand-in-hand with indigenous leaders to establish vocational training centers and economic development programs while sharing the Gospel message.

Ruling year info

2010

Executive Director

Chris Collins

Main address

PO Box 189

Fresno, CA 93707 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-2028889

NTEE code info

Vocational Technical (B30)

International Educational Development (Q34)

Business, Youth Development (O53)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

WAVS vocational schools operate in a tiny country in West Africa called Guinea-Bissau. It’s a place where most people live off less than $2 a day. But for nearly 2 million people, Guinea-Bissau is home. Unfortunately, their home faces difficult challenges: crippling poverty, a lack of basic education services, and few resources to help aspiring entrepreneurs. Because Guinea-Bissau is so small and undeveloped, many large organizations have chosen to focus their efforts elsewhere (including global nonprofits like World Vision and Compassion International, and government agencies like USAID). For this reason, WAVS has started its work here – a nearly forgotten corner of the world.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Vocational School in Guinea-Bissau

WAVS invests in indigenous potential leaders who will seek the best interests of their communities and country.

We do this by providing vocational training and encouraging ethical practices so that they can be pioneers of change in government and business.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Extremely poor people, Low-income people, Working poor

Related Program

Vocational School in Guinea-Bissau

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

WAVS aims to equip students with life-changing job skills through practical, hands-on job training in order for graduates to earn a reliable income and provide for their families for the rest of their lives.

WAVS hires local teachers and administrators to run its vocational schools to develop sustainable programs that benefit the community. Vocational training courses are offered for: welding, English, French and computer basics. The courses are regularly developed to meet the changing needs of the community. Students are taught using practical hand-on skills training to enhance the learning and prepare the students for the workplace or furthering their education elsewhere, usually at a university.

In the last decade, WAVS vocational schools have equipped more than 1,700 young men and women with life-changing job skills. But that is just the beginning.

A new campus is now under construction in the capital of Guinea-Bissau. Once complete, it will train more than 1,000 students a year – all while sharing God’s love through word and deed.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

West African Vocational Schools
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

West African Vocational Schools

Board of directors
as of 04/25/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Bob Whalen

Sam Babcock

Chris Woods

Lydia Dawson

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No