Westside Baby

basics for children in need

aka WestSide Baby   |   Seattle, WA   |  www.westsidebaby.org

Mission

WestSide Baby, in partnership with our community, provides essential items to local children in need by collecting and distributing diapers, clothings, toys and equipment.

Ruling year info

2002

Executive Director

Sarah Cody Roth

Main address

10002 14th Ave. SW

Seattle, WA 98146 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-2124405

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

King County is the 13th most populous county in the United States, with a 2019 estimated population of 2.25 million and growing. Though the region boasts high life expectancy, an educated population, and low unemployment rate on average, King County has the 3rd highest income inequality in Washington state, with the top 1% of the population making more than 25x the bottom 99%. The economic boom of the region benefits the top earners, but many working families are struggling to afford rising rent costs and are forced to migrate from their communities in search of affordable housing. Families with children increasingly rely on safety-net programs. According to recent data from King County, almost 20,000 children under the age of five in King County are living in poverty.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Diaper Bank

WestSide Baby was one of the first agencies in the nation to establish a diaper bank to collect and distribute large quantities of diapers, free of charge, to families in need. In 2020, WestSide Baby distributed over 2.37 million diapers. The diaper need in King County for families in poverty is currently 20 times what we are providing; closer to 22,000,000 diapers annually for the 10,000 children under age three living below the federal poverty level.
WestSide Baby collects diapers through community diaper drives, corporate gifts and purchases of bulk diapers. Partnerships with Huggies and the National Diaper Bank Network have resulted in large-scale diaper donations.

Population(s) Served
Children
Infants and toddlers
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants

WestSide Baby is committed to providing safe, appropriate car seats to local children in need while also keeping used car seats in circulation and out of landfills.  Car crashes are the leading cause of death for children over 1 year in King County.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Economically disadvantaged people
Families
Ethnic and racial groups
Infants and toddlers

WestSide Baby distributes gently used clothing, free of charge, to thousands of local children.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National Diaper Bank Network Member 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The new ordering system (Launched Q3 2018) has enhanced reporting capabilities that will help us more accurately report the number of Children Served.

Number of independent organizations served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In addition to adding 43 new emergency distribution sites in 2020 as a response to COVID-19, we established 9 new agency partnerships with community based organizations.

Estimated dollar value of clothing and household goods donations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

COVID-19 pandemic impacted our community's ability to donate physical goods in a healthy and safe way. In order to make up for this decrease, additional funds were raised to purchase new items.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

WestSide Baby exists to provide children’s basic needs for families who are unsupported by the systemic inequities in our community and nationwide. We work with our community to examine where the greatest need is in our region, and redistribute resources so that caregivers do not have to choose between paying rent, keeping healthy food on the table, or diapering their baby in a clean, dry diaper. Through examining the systems that create these inequities, and creating sustainable and responsive distribution models, WestSide Baby has grown from distributing 500,000 diapers in 2011, to over 2.37 million diapers in 2020.

WestSide Baby believes providing basic needs is a crucial way to decrease the negative health outcomes associated with poverty and racism in our community. When any child’s potential is stunted by the inequities that limit them, from education to health-care, to their employment as adults and overall lifespan, our entire community suffers. The health of our children is a key indicator of our health as a society. WestSide Baby bridges a gap in human services by helping to ensure that all the children in our region have clothing that fits, a safe sleep option and clean diapers to keep them safe from infection.

The impact of our work is far-reaching, and affects the community on three core levels:
1. Children's basic needs for warmth, safety and security are met
2. Caregivers Meet Their Children’s Basic Needs
3. Direct Service Providers Build Trust with Clients & Connect Caregivers to Other Resources

WestSide Baby provides low-income, homeless and refugee families in western King County with the essential material goods they need to properly care for their children. WestSide Baby is the only organization in Western King County with a sole focus on the large-scale distribution of free diapers and pre-owned children’s goods to caregivers so that they can meet a child’s basic physical needs for warmth and safety. By depending on our community and implementing streamlined systems and volunteers in our warehouses, we collect gently-used children’s clothing, car seats and cribs, along with donated diapers and hygiene products, and then distribute them, free of charge, to families in need. We also leverage large-scale corporate partnerships to receive bulk donations of new items such as car seats, diapers and strollers for distribution to the families we serve.

WestSide Baby doesn’t provide direct service. We don’t sell children’s goods or interface directly with the public. Our nationally recognized service model aligns us with a broad range of 114 social welfare agencies and human services providers such as shelters, food banks, public health departments, clinics and early learning/preschool programs. The case managers, social workers and staff place orders online with WestSide Baby for the specific items their clients need. Each order is fulfilled at our warehouses, then picked up and personally delivered to an individual family by their caseworker.

WestSide Baby is the only organization in Western King County with a sole focus on the large-scale distribution of free diapers and pre-owned children’s goods to families in need. WestSide Baby was created in 2001 and based on a national diaper bank model that had already taken root in eastern King County at Eastside Baby Corner. In 2014, WestSide Baby acquired St. Joseph’s Baby Corner through a merger and grew to serve all of western King County. We continue to partner closely with Eastside Baby Corner to ensure our work is aligned to best support and empower families across King County.

WestSide Baby doesn’t provide direct service. We don’t sell children’s goods or interface directly with the public and caseworkers do not refer their clients to WestSide Baby. Our nationally recognized service model aligns us with a broad range of 114 social welfare agencies and human services providers such as shelters, food banks, public health departments, clinics and early learning/preschool programs. The case managers, social workers and staff place orders online with WestSide Baby for the specific items their clients need. Each order is fulfilled at our warehouses, then picked up and personally delivered to an individual family by their caseworker. Our unique model allows us to meet people where they are – in their neighborhoods; even at home. WestSide Baby responds individually to each and every family, delivering exactly what a family tells us they need to care for their children- - not what we or anyone else might think they need.

The power of our work is rooted in the partnerships we create with frontline service providers; they are the key to our program’s effectiveness and efficiency. Our partners turn a simple car seat or delivery of diapers into a catalyst for caregivers to become more capable and confident parents to their children and for families to move towards self-sufficiency.

In 2021, WestSide Baby was faced with the difficult challenge of keeping volunteers and staff safe, while at the same time running a warehouse and filling a tidal wave of requests for children’s supplies. Human service providers experienced a significant increase in requests for diapers and children’s basics from their clients in 2020 and 2021.
WestSide Baby put protocols in place for on-site work which followed COVID-safe guidelines. Despite the constraints on our service last year, our distribution of most-requested items (diapers and car seats) continued at record high levels in 2021.
The following strategies helped us meet the increased demand for these goods:
• WestSide Baby partnered with several highly visible, family-friendly agencies that were already reducing barriers for families. New partnerships with Seattle School District, Seattle Housing Authority’s low-income housing facilities and Boys and Girls Club locations helped WestSide Baby make children’s goods available to large numbers of families.
• Strategic partnerships were formed with providers that have deep ties to their communities and were well positioned to reach families that were experiencing serious hardship. Rainier Valley Midwives, Southeast Youth & Family Services and East African Community Services are a few of WestSide Baby’s new community-based, non-profit partners.
• WestSide Baby expanded corporate partnerships with Huggies and Dorel Industries that allow us to procure bulk donations of critical items like diapers and car seats.
• In Q4, WestSide Baby outreached to over 50 new agencies that are not currently WSB partners to supply roughly 500,000 diapers to underserved communities. This was instrumental in meeting our goal of distributing over 2.4 million diapers in 2021. Not only that, but this effort resulted in establishing new relationships with community based organizations, providing resources to families that have not previously had access to a diaper bank.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Families in the WestSide Baby Community are facing a myriad of challenges as they care for their children. In 2019, 10% of families who received items from WestSide Baby were experiencing homelessness and 38% of families’ primary caregiver was unemployed. When parents can’t afford clothing, cribs and diapers – children suffer. WestSide Baby works with 80 different social service agencies at over 100 sites with over 500 individual providers supporting families in multiple areas including: early learning (20%), parental support (18%), health/medical care (17%), homelessness (10%), food insecurity (7%), and domestic violence (5%).

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Quickly after the pandemic hit in 2020, WestSide Baby surveyed provider partners to check in and see what they needed most. In order to meet the incredible demand for families facing a basic needs crisis in our community, WestSide Baby adapted quickly to find innovative ways to meet an unprecedented level of need. We quickly expanded partnerships that allow us to procure critical items in bulk, often in new conditions that minimize the time and labor needed to process and distribute these items quickly. We increased our diaper distribution 82% over the same time period in 2019, while also adding 47 new community sites around King County to distribute items to families safely and efficiently.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Since we know that our resources are limited, we have been able to target them at the greatest need reported to us by families and the direct service providers who work with them on a daily basis.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Westside Baby
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Westside Baby

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Nick Peyton

Epiphany School

Term: 2019 - 2022

Nishat Akhter

Amazon

Janet Ali

Nucor Steele

Rhea Bhere

Jodi Ryznar

King County

Josh Sutton

YMCA of Greater Seattle

Lauren Tomala

REI

Erin Hulme

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Nick Peyton

Epiphany School

Crystal Amobi

Starbucks

Jessica Trouillaud

Carly Young

Why Not You Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/21/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/21/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.