HEALING MUSES

Music heals.

Oakland, CA   |  http://www.healingmuses.org

Mission

Music heals. We provide high-quality, live music to support patient care in cancer care facilities, hospitals, hospices and convalescent centers throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.

Ruling year info

2002

Executive Director

Ms. Sarah Anne Shockley

Main address

PO Box 10862

Oakland, CA 94610 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-2140492

NTEE code info

Health - General and Rehabilitative N.E.C. (E99)

Music (A68)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Medical care can be stressful. Trying to maintain a positive and hopeful attitude if you or your loved ones are unwell, under-going medical procedures, even simple ones, can be a huge challenge. Our harp music creates a stress-reducing and calming environment that reinforces healing for patients, visitors and staff. Our music quietly conjures a sense of calm flow, of de-stressing the distressed.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

therapeutic music

Musicians with professional-level skills and experience offer a repertoire developed through research and direct experience that provides a calming, healing presence.

Healing Muses has chosen to use softer-voiced instruments (e.g. harps) that don’t compete with the human voice. Our musicians have the ability to both play and gauge "audience” response and the skill to accommodate and subtly adjust to meet audience need.

In the hospitals we serve, we typically offer two hours of music at a time on a weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. A normal daytime waiting room engagement can provide calm to as many as 250 people, and music on a ward may serve between 15 and 45 patients as well as staff, reducing general noise levels and lifting staff morale.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Healing Muses aims to:
1. Use healing music to provide a calming and stress-reducing environment for patients, visitors and staff at no direct cost to patients.

2. Provide quiet, musical sound that:
-- In waiting rooms, offers a measure of privacy for people to have quiet conversations and/or deal with emotions and a positive distraction to focus children.
-- On the wards and near nurses' stations, lowers background noise and reinforce the culture of healing.

3. Keep abreast of research on the therapeutic effects of music and its use in hospitals, palliative care and cancer centers, and convalescent centers; use that to inform our repertoire.

4. Raise awareness about the healing potential of live, top-quality music through our program and interactions.

5. Solidify our organization financially with a sustainable model, and develop an engaged community of supporters, volunteers, and advocates so that our mission continues.

Healing Muses' mission and program are based upon the body of knowledge and research that has confirmed the power of music to reduce stress and promote healing. Our strategy and approach for maximizing the benefit of music falls into two main categories:

1. Provide consistent, professional, high-quality services that meet the needs of our clients, their staff and their own clientele
a) Provide services in targeted locations, namely cancer care centers, convalescent centers, hospital wards and waiting rooms, where benefit goes to patients either directly, or by benefiting those who serve them

b) Employ professional musicians who possess the following qualifications
-- Have memorized an appropriate repertoire, allowing them to gauge 'audience' mood, and adjust for the situation while they are playing
-- Demonstrate situational awareness to model calm, centered, respectful behavior in the hospital setting

c) Use instruments that don't complete with the human voice and thus help lower noise volume and provide a measure of privacy

d) Conduct ongoing research and program review by the musicians ('Muses')

2. Continue to develop our organization into a sustainable, professionally-led not-for-profit, with a solid community of support
a) Develop a sustainable financial model that looks to combined private, public and community sources for ongoing support

b) Identify and expand our partnerships, contract opportunities and grants

c) Conduct ongoing organizational assessment and planning by Board and staff

d) Hold educational and fundraising activities to engage, grow our base and increase understanding of the healing potential of targeted, live music

The organization's capabilities, like any solid mission-driven organization, lies in the commitment, skills, talents and collaborative work of its people:
• A deeply committed Board, whose members include several with professional music and/or healthcare backgrounds and expertise in our program work

• The musical expertise and reputations of our professional musicians, some of whom have been serving in health care through Healing Muses for more than a decade

• A repertoire of music thoroughly vetted for meeting our program goals and the needs of those listening

Healing Muses has made great strides in strengthening our organization, the Board, our program, and financial health. Accomplishments include:

1. Organization & Board
-- Developed and instituted a set of policies and procedures to ensure consistent, professional management in line with our ethical goals and fiduciary responsibilities
--- Rejuvenated our Board with new, committed members possessing needed skills

2. Program
-- Added to our core group of harpers, gaining depth and breadth in repertoire and scheduling flexibility
-- Expanded our sites and increased our engagements

3. Fundraising & donor base
-- Maintained a dedicated donor base
-- From 2016 to 2019 increased community contributions by 23 percent
-- Shifted to a single fundraising event, vastly improving cost-to-benefit ratio

As we look ahead to the future, Healing Muses aims to achieve the following:

1. Organization and Board
-- Develop a realistic three-year plan for the organization
-- Grow our community base to develop potential new Board members
-- Bring onto the Board or identify volunteers with fund-raising, grant-writing skills
-- Improve our financial situation to fund increased staffing to better support our program and its goals

2. Program
-- Seek and sign new contracts
-- Improve our financial situation to fund engagements at low-income clinics that lack the budget for our services – this is an important objective for us

3. Fund-raising & donor base
-- Solidify our financial situation to support key program and organizational objectives
-- Procure ongoing, sustainable, long-term funding to ensure continued existence of Healing Muses and our mission. We have successfully pivoted to a donor and grant-based financial plan since 2017.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve people of all ages, genders, races, and cultural backgrounds who interact with the care centers we serve in the San Francisco Bay Area. This includes patients, staff, family members, and visitors at cancer treatment centers, pediatric palliative care centers, and hospitals.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email, face to face interactions with the people we serve,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    At the primary hospital of our mission, staff members requested that our harpers move from their position to specific locations to better serve them, which we did.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our organization has been set up from the outset such that there is a totally open dialogue with the people we serve as to how best to accomplish that. We adapt as needed to any feedback we receive.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

HEALING MUSES
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HEALING MUSES

Board of directors
as of 02/25/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Marla Fibish

self-employed musician & teacher

Term: 2014 -

Bruce Victor

UCSF

Philip Batchelder

Inanna Hazel

PAN Berkeley

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/2/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/25/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.