Food Bank of Alaska, Inc.

Fill plates, nourish communities

aka FBA   |   Anchorage, AK   |  http://www.foodbankofalaska.org

Mission

Food Bank of Alaska is dedicated to eliminating hunger in Alaska by obtaining and distributing food to nonprofit agencies feeding hungry people and through anti-hunger leadership. We believe that no one deserves to be hungry.

Ruling year info

1979

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Jim Baldwin

Main address

2192 Viking Drive

Anchorage, AK 99501 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

92-0073175

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Donated Food Program

Food Bank of Alaska distributes more than 9.0 million pounds of food a year, and more than 60% of this is food donated by the food industry. Food Bank of Alaska is a busy distribution center, deploying a fleet of trucks to recover surplus food that would otherwise be disposed of by food industry partners – grocery stores, wholesalers, producers, farmers and the fishing business. We also collect food donated by community members. We then redistribute this food to pantries and meal programs – 150 partner food pantries and meal programs across Alaska – who make it available to children, families, and seniors in their neighborhoods.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) is a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Child Nutrition Program established to ensure that low-income children, ages 18 and younger, continue to receive nutritious meals when school is not in session. Through SFSP, Food Bank of Alaska provides free, nutritious meals at approved programs in areas with significant concentrations of low-income children. Programs are provided by schools, private non-profits and local or tribal governments. Each year Food Bank of Alaska is the sponsor for 25-40 sites, almost all of them rural. As the sponsor, Food Bank of Alaska fulfills administrative and logistical requirements such as training, paperwork, record keeping, site monitoring, meal ordering and shipping, allowing the sites to focus on feeding children in need within their communities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Food Bank of Alaska partners, 40 of them in rural Alaska, feed their hungry neighbors through The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). TEFAP is a commodity program administered through the State of Alaska Department of Education & Early Development. To support farmers and other producers, the U.S. government buys surplus food. For example, the government recently purchased surplus Alaska salmon. Instead of letting this food be wasted, the USDA distributes it to states for soup kitchens and food pantries. The State of Alaska contracts with Food Bank of Alaska to distribute TEFAP commodities to food pantries across the state. The TEFAP distribution in Alaska is based on the proportion of low income residents and persons on unemployment.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

This program, through the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) is designed to supplement the nutrition of seniors in need. Food Bank of Alaska coordinates distribution of monthly CSFP boxes to eligible clients through a network of partner agencies. Contents of the boxes follow state-approved meal plans consisting of grains, proteins, milk, cheese, fruits and vegetables. Food Bank of Alaska distributes approximately 2,200 boxes a month with the help of our partner agencies. The State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Assistance, Family Nutrition Programs, is responsible for administering CSFP.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

Food Bank of Alaska’s Mobile Food Pantry distributes fresh food to Anchorage families in need. Families tell us they especially appreciate the healthy produce and dairy products that don’t make it into their grocery budget. Food Bank of Alaska works with ten sponsoring agencies that conduct Mobile Food Pantries at nine convenient locations in neighborhoods around Anchorage.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

Where we work

Financials

Food Bank of Alaska, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Food Bank of Alaska, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 07/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Amy DeBruhl

Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium

Term: 2020 - 2023

Elizabeth Nobmann

EDN Nutrition Consulting

Robin Phillips

Ted Stevens Foundation

Amy DeBruhl

Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium

Katria Kangas

Oil Search Alaska

Allison Biastock

Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority

Jennifer Coughlin

Landye Bennett Blumstein

Milena Sevigny

Tote Maritime Alaska

Claudia Russell

Matson

Katie Pesznecker

Alyeska Pipeline Service Company

Katrina Kangas

Oil Search Alaska LLC

Tani Kron

ConocoPhillips Alaska

Holly Mitchell

Fred Meyer Alaska

Robin Phillips

Ted Stevens Foundation

Joe Rybak

Carrs Safeway

Milena Sevigny

TOTE

Erik Viste

Anchorage School District

Rich Sewell

Alaska Dept. of Transportation and Public Facilities

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/7/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

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Sexual orientation

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Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/07/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.