Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc.

People.Partnership.Potential.

aka CITC   |   Anchorage, AK   |  http://www.citci.org

Mission

Cook Inlet Tribal Council's mission is to work in partnership with Our People to develop opportunities that fulfill Our endless potential.

Notes from the nonprofit

For Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC), the past year was a story of resilience and innovation. For all of us, 2020 has reshaped our world and challenged us to forge new paths to success. At CITC, this journey of discovery has resulted in an organization that is more adaptable, responsive, and accessible to Our People. Our success is not achieved alone. It stands on a foundation of support from you—our steadfast partners, donors, and ambassadors making our impact possible each day. I am inspired by our growing network of support at CITC, we are immensely grateful for your enthusiasm, encouragement, and dedication. Thank you for being a valued partner on this journey with CITC. With you by our side, I am confident the lessons from 2020 will serve as a catalyst for greater strength, collective community wellness, and a renewed belief in our endless potential. Gloria O'Neill - President and CEO

Ruling year info

1984

President / CEO

Gloria O'Neill

Main address

3600 San Jeronimo Drive

Anchorage, AK 99508 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

92-0094184

NTEE code info

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Cook Inlet Tribal Council's mission is to work in partnership with Our People to develop opportunities that fulfill Our endless potential.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CITC Core Service Areas

Created in 1983, Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc. (CITC) is a tribally operated non-profit social service provider with the mission to work in partnership with Our People to develop opportunities that fulfill Our endless potential. We ground our work in five core cultural values: Interdependence, Resilience, Accountability, Respect, and Humor. While our programs and participants are most prevalent in the Municipality of Anchorage (population: 288,970), CITC provides a variety of services across the Cook Inlet region of southcentral Alaska, predominately—but not exclusively—for Alaska Native/American Indian people (AN/AI). This region includes Anchorage, Alaska’s largest city, which is now home to more than 23% of the state’s total Alaska Native population. Currently, 9.1% of Anchorage residents identify as American Indian or Alaska Native; of all cities in the United States, Anchorage has the greatest proportion, and the fifth largest number, of AN/AI residents.

For 38 years, CITC has provided social services through integrated programs in multiple areas of need, including culturally relevant education, workforce development, family preservation, and behavioral health interventions. We offer these services through five service departments: Alaska’s People (AKP), Child and Family Services (CFS), Employment and Training Services (ETS), Recovery Services (RS), and Youth Empowerment Services (YES).

In 2020, CITC reached over 12,000 individuals from infant to elder with the following impacts: 3,983 participants were supported through training and supportive work services; participant wages increased by $10.14/hour; nearly 1,648 people participated in recovery and re-entry services; and more than 454 families received crisis intervention and family preservation services. CITC also engaged over 2,478 youth through the Native Youth Olympics and academic support programs, served 543 students in school classrooms with mobile Fab Lab education, and engaged students for over 10,000 hours onsite at CITC’s Fab Lab.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Work status and occupations
Social and economic status
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships

Where we work

Accreditations

CARF International 2020

Awards

Best of Alaska Business Award 2017

Alaska Business Monthly

Best of Alaska Business Award 2021

Alaska Business Monthly

Affiliations & memberships

Alaska Federation of Natives 2021

Alaska Economic Development Corporation 2021

Anchorage Chamber of Commerce 2021

Society of Human Resources Management 2021

Foraker Group 2021

Covenant House Alaska 2021

Alaska Behavioral Health Association 2021

Anchorage Regional Behavioral Health Coalition 2021

National Indian Health Board 2021

Mat-Su Health Foundation 2021

Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority 2021

Alaska Department of Health 2021

Social Services Division of Behavioral Health 2021

Rasmuson Foundation 2021

Mat-Su Borough School District 2021

Anchorage School District 2021

Rural CAP 2021

Alaska Native Heritage Center 2021

Cook Inlet Housing Authority 2021

Village of Ekluta Health Clinic 2021

Chickaloon Tribal Council 2021

Knik Tribal Council 2021

University of Anchorage Alaska Center for Human Development 2021

University of Anchorage Alaska Division of Population Health Sciences 2021

Department of Justice 2021

Department of Corrections 2021

Anchorage Firefighter and Paramedics 2021

University of Colorado 2021

Southcentral Foundation 2021

Department of Health & Human Services 2021

Native Village of Eklutna 2021

Kenaitze Indian Tribe 2021

Ninilchik Traditional Council 2021

Salamatof Tribe 2021

Seldovia Village Tribe 2021

Native Village of Tyonek 2021

Office of Children's Services 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

- Number of people connected to employment and training opportunities with a focus on personal and professional development to support individuals achieving their potential.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Work status and occupations

Related Program

CITC Core Service Areas

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

-full-service career center -recruitment & development -skills training & job placement -internships

- Number of families strengthened through family preservation, reunification, parenting classes, and life-skills development services.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships

Related Program

CITC Core Service Areas

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

- family preservation -reunification -parenting classes -life-skills development

- Number of youth who participated in education services, including: in-school classes, after-school services, techno-culture camps, youth services, and NYO Games.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

CITC Core Service Areas

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

-in-school classes -after-school services -techno-culture camps -youth services -NYO Games

- Number of people working to overcome addiction through participation in residential, outpatient, youth services, peer support, and re-entry support.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health

Related Program

CITC Core Service Areas

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

-residential -outpatient -youth services -peer support -reentry support

- Number of youth participating in early learning through Early Head Start, kindergarten preparedness, family services, and Yup'ik immersion classes.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships

Related Program

CITC Core Service Areas

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

-Early Head Start -kindergarten preparedness -family services -Yup'ik immersion

- Number of people working towards self-sufficiency through supportive employment, healthcare training, vocational rehabilitation, youth services and GED prep.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Work status and occupations

Related Program

CITC Core Service Areas

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

- supportive employment - healthcare training -vocational rehabilitation -youth services -GED prep -childcare assistance

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CITC World Build: Dreaming of 2040
Goals established by CITC Board of Directors World-Build session to envision the future for CITC, our communities, and our people.

CITC Resolution to achieve goals established during World Build:
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of Directors of Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc., hereby declares the following strategic direction:
• CITC will move from Sustainability at the individual, organizational, and community level to develop a plan to guide the future for how all of Our People can thrive: “Edzege”;
• CITC includes humor as one of the core values supporting and driving the work across the organization;
• Spiritual wellness is a core principle of CITC’ s work in service of Our Mission and Our People and is unashamedly embraced throughout the organization;
• Youth will be involved in all future planning for the organization;
• Elders and youth will engage in intergenerational, reciprocal learning;
• CITC will change rules in the service of increasing agility and flexibility for Our Mission and Our People;
• CITC will continue to build relationships with the Tribes;
• CITC will grow and foster political leaders across local, state, and federal governments, including in the executive, legislative, and board levels to put Alaska Native people in decision-making positions;
• CITC will redefine what education is, based in culture and values, and co-designed with the community, with an
openness to radical new learning models that leave four walls behind;
• CITC will incorporate peer-to-peer and multi-generational models into its service delivery systems and recognizes the essential importance of social connectedness to Our People;
• CITC’s participants have guided the organization to the Five Factors of 1) financial stability, 2) healthy lifestyles, 3) education and training, 4) cultural and spiritual wellness, and 5) relationships that lead to families’ success, with the understanding that attention to all five domains are necessary to create change in any one of them;
• CITC will ensure that participants are partners in the co-design of programs and both in charge of and in control
of their own information, in relationships of reciprocity;
• CITC will ensure effective investment in technology by piloting innovative projects that will keep pace with the
rapidly changing ways in which Our People and the world communicate and connect.

Guided by our Board of Directors, leadership, and the voices of our participants, we will co-design a path from Sustainability to Thrive- Ability. We pick up the tools of the modern world and move forward using them to channel
our traditional knowledge, and our connections to one another. In this way, we merge worlds—tradition and technology — to build a future that works to empower and unlock the endless potential of Our People. Our ancientness is our futurism, and our strength comes from knowing that the tools we need to thrive are already within us. We place our participants at the center of our ThriveAbility 2025 goals. They are catalysts and co-designers for our vision, our community, and Our People. CITC’s ThriveAbility goals are structured around the core pillars of People, Partnership, and Potential. Within each category, we identify and outline three strategic intentions that will collectively chart our path to ThriveAbility.
People Goal:
• CITC will set a bold new standard by infusing Spiritual Wellness into our work and our relationships with Our People.
• CITC will broaden its use of the Five Factors framework — our participants’ vision of success as defined by Financial Stability, Relationships, Healthy Lifestyles, Education/Training, and Spiritual Wellness — to ensure effectiveness of services and partnerships with participants, employees, and stakeholders of all generations.
• CITC will leverage social connectedness and explore system-wide applications for peer-to-peer models of learning and engagement for participants and employees.
Partnership Goal:
• CITC will align program structures and technology systems to increase accessibility for participants and ensure transparency in all participant data and records.
• CITC will facilitate two-way, reciprocal communication with Tribal partners, foster an environment of progressive transparency, and implement a framework of partnership that acknowledges and respects Tribal sovereignty.
• “Our ancientness is our futurism.” This core truth comes to life when we bring our Youth and Elders together. CITC will honor its heritage, create opportunity, and promote cultural knowledge sharing by connecting Youth and Elders.
Potential Goal:
• CITC will build models of education using leading technologies that reflect the changing landscape of learning, workforce demands, and participant lives.
• CITC will play a key role in supporting the development of Alaska Native leaders active at all levels of corporate/non-profit leadership, community engagement, all branches of government, and policy-making.
• Create, acquire, and deploy leading technology to fulfill our Mission, grow partnerships, and share our story.

To accomplish our work, CITC regularly partners with community organizations, such as local public schools, universities, health care providers, and nonprofit organizations, seeking to engage in relationships that advance our respective missions, further our respective reach, and improve our shared community. We engage with all levels of government to foster a better community for all, partner with foundations to provide entrepreneurial solutions to complex social problems that affect us all, and collaborate with our corporate community to develop mutually-beneficial solutions that result in workforce improvement, economic development, and enhanced corporate visibility. CITC oversight and guidance is provided by a Board of Directors, who meet quarterly, and President/CEO, Gloria O’Neill, who has worked extensively with federal, State, tribal, and local non-profit agencies, as well as pioneering social enterprise projects in collaboration with the for-profit sector, in her executive role.

We have successfully managed federal funds and private philanthropic gifts since CITC’s inception. Over the past two years, CITC has expanded its consolidated gross budget from $60 million to $90 million. CITC successfully manages over 50 grants and contracts at any given time from federal and state agencies as well as several private foundations. CITC is also the largest distributor of Tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) funds in Alaska. CITC has consistently demonstrated that it has the organizational capacity, infrastructure, and resources to manage its programs and resources effectively and efficiently, resulting in significant community impact.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    CITC provides a variety of services across the Cook Inlet region of southcentral Alaska, predominately—but not exclusively—for Alaska Native/American Indian people (AN/AI). This region includes Anchorage, Alaska’s largest city, which is now home to more than 23% of the state’s total Alaska Native population. Currently, 9.1% of Anchorage residents identify as American Indian or Alaska Native; of all cities in the United States, Anchorage has the greatest proportion, and the fifth largest number, of AN/AI residents.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Over the past four years, CITC has been developing an assessment tool, initiated by a critical question: “What moves a family forward?” Initially, its development was based on input from national experts and staff experience. It was called the Four Factors project, named for the four domains that were determined to be critical to a family’s health and well-being: fiscal stability, education/training, healthy lifestyles, and healthy relationships. But when we asked our participants to review our findings, they told us that we had entirely missed a domain that they felt to be critical to family health and wellbeing: cultural and spiritual wellness. The “Four Factors Project” became, then, the “Five Factors Assessment,” supported and significantly modified by participant input.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Participants also entirely changed the emphasis and focus of Five Factors. Initially, a likert scale for each of the five domains described each point on the scale (e.g. under fiscal transportation, a high score was associated with owning a well-repaired vehicle). In pilot tests of Five Factors, we received feedback that our choices of low and high scores came from values that our recipients did not necessarily share (“I don’t want a car – I like to walk!”). Therefore, we went back to the drawing board, and detached our values from the various points on the likert scales. Participants are now asked—in fact required—to choose how satisfied or confident they are in each of the domains, thereby creating their own individual definitions of success, and their own priorities for change.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 7/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ivan Encelewski

Ninilchik Traditional Council

Janelle Baker

Native Village of Tyonek

Diane Buls

Cook Inlet Region, Inc.

Debra Call

Cook Inlet Region, Inc.

Maria Coleman

Native Village of Eklutna

John Crawford

Seldovia Village Tribe

John Estabrook, Jr.

Cook Inlet Region, Inc.

Douglas Fifer

Cook Inlet Region, Inc.

Theodore Garcia

Knik Tribal Council

Shawna Larson

Chickaloon Traditional Council

Patrick Marrs

Cook Inlet Region, Inc.

Chris Monfor

Salamatof Native Association

Debra Morris

Cook Inlet Region, Inc.

Clare Swan

Cook Inlet Region, Inc.

Mike Tucker

Cook Inlet Region, Inc.

Kaarlo Wik

Cook Inlet Region, Inc.

Rita Smagge

Diane Buls

Rita Smagge

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Native American/American Indian/Indigenous
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/30/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.