Cook Inletkeeper

Clean Water · Healthy Salmon

Homer, AK   |  www.inletkeeper.org

Mission

Cook Inletkeeper is a community-based nonprofit organization that combines research, education and advocacy to protect Alaska's Cook Inlet watershed and the life it sustains.

Ruling year info

1996

Executive Director

Sue Mauger

Main address

3734 Ben Walters Lane

Homer, AK 99603 USA

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Formerly known as

Cook Inlet Keeper

EIN

92-0156450

NTEE code info

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

Environmental Quality, Protection, and Beautification N.E.C. (C99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Healthy Habitat Program

Cook Inletkeeper’s Healthy Habitat Program supports our goal to protect healthy habitats in a changing climate. The Watershed Watch Project envisions sustainable human development that protects salmon streams, wetlands and other sensitive wildlife habitat areas from pollution and habitat destruction. The Project’s goals are t 1) help citizens engage government and industry to resolve local and regional environmental concerns; 2) hold government and industry accountable for enforcing and complying with environmental laws; and 3) ensure that environmental standards protect clean water, habitat and social justice. Cook Inletkeeper relies on its “eyes and ears” network of concerned citizens to report incidents of pollution and habitat destruction to our toll free hotline (1-888 MY INLET), and helps citizens document incidents, take samples, and ensure proper agency response. Cook Inletkeeper also organizes citizens to comment on development proposals and defend environmental policies. The Salmon Sanctuary Project promotes biodiversity in the watershed by protecting critical cold-water salmon habitat areas. Established research shows the importance of cold-water “refugia” to aid upstream migration of adult salmon. This project uses state-of-the-art habitat science to help ensure Alaska’s coastal ecosystems continue to thrive. Strategic protections make it possible to maintain and enhance refugia to promote the long-term health of important Cook Inlet salmon fisheries.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Inletkeeper’s Clean Water Program supports Cook Inletkeeper’s goal to grow support for clean water and strong local economies. This program provides several fantastic opportunities for our staff to reach out to the public with very tangible information, opening the door for greater discussion about watershed protection. Through its Clean Boating & Harbors Project, Cook Inletkeeper works with local harbors and mariners to reduce boat-based pollution. We work with partners to distribute 10,000 clean boating and healthy fisheries tidebooks to people who engage in activities on shore and at sea throughout the Cook Inlet region. The Alaska State Office of Boating Safety has chosen this tidebook to distribute in its workshops. In addition, clean boating kits, which we distribute, help boaters implement best management practices that prevent spills and save money. Our Electronic Waste Recycling Project provides Alaskans with a responsible outlet for their used electronics, helps reduce demand for new minerals and mining that may harm water quality and reduces the harmful toxins that reach our ocean through runoff from our landfills. In 2012-13, Cook Inletkeeper staff is working to expand this program to more communities. The Citizens’ Environmental Monitoring Program connects Alaskans directly to their water resources by training citizens to collect baseline water quality data on Cook Inlet streams. This effort generates vital data for informed water resource management and fosters the stewardship needed to activate Alaskans to protect their local surface waters and wetlands. Finally, Cook Inletkeeper’s Safe Drinking Water Project empowers local residents who rely on private wells, springs or surface waters with information about how to protect their drinking water sources, and gives them access to discounted drinking water testing services—for contaminants ranging from lead and arsenic to bacteria and nitrates. In 2012-13, staff will expand this program to more rural Alaskan communities.

Population(s) Served

Cook Inletkeeper’s Clean Energy Program supports our goal to promote the shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy. Cook Inletkeeper recognizes climate change as the most pressing threat posed to our natural systems and the people, communities and economies they support. The Clean Energy Project works to move energy projects and policies away from fossil fuel production and consumption, and toward renewable energy alternatives and lasting jobs that minimize impacts to fish habitat, water quality and human health. The Project’s goals are t 1) prevent or minimize the ecological impacts from coal, oil and gas development; 2) build a broader constituency for fish habitat and water quality protection; and 3) promote projects and policies that embrace tidal, wind, geothermal and other renewable energy supplies. Since its inception, Cook Inletkeeper has protected over 600,000 acres of beluga whale habitat from oil and gas drilling, reduced oil pipeline spills by over 100%, crafted federal pipeline safety legislation, and helped secure tug vessels to aid oil tankers in Cook Inlet’s notoriously rough waters. Cook Inletkeeper’s targeted energy strategies include aggressive legal, scientific and technical advocacy, effective citizen education and organizing, and persuasive media outreach.

Population(s) Served

Cook Inletkeeper’s Capacity Program supports our goal to build a healthy organization with the capacity to achieve its vision. Cook Inletkeeper works to build the internal operations capacity needed to maximize organizational effectiveness and efficiency. Through this program Cook Inletkeeper; a) grows a broader constituency for change in Cook Inlet; b) builds a diverse and sustainable funding base; c) enhances staff and board development through trainings, network meetings, and shared initiatives; and d) engages in strategic planning to maximize organizational productivity and effectiveness.A detailed annual work plan guides Cook Inletkeeper staff and is based on our strategic plan that includes concrete mechanisms for evaluating progress on a quarterly and annual basis. Each work plan project contains discrete, quantifiable metrics that are easily measurable, and Inletkeeper staff ranks project success through a numeric ranking process on a quarterly basis. At the end of each year, Cook Inletkeeper staff and Board review the past year’s accomplishments and challenges during a full day work session, and rely on this information to develop the coming year’s budget and work plan in accord with our strategic plan. Cook Inletkeeper’s internal evaluation process plays a vital role, keeping the organization focused on its most important goals and objectives, and provides it with the flexibility it needs to change course as new issues and challenges arise.

Population(s) Served

We are only as strong as the communities we work within. Cook Inletkeeper believes that a strong community means a community that is eagerly engaged in the political process as well as the reverence for healthy habitat.

With important issues ranging from salmon habitat protections to funding for schools, we monitor Alaska Government and local elections because they impact the landscape and the communities we care about. Yours. Policy shapes our communities and our relationship to clean water and healthy habitat - we can organize and build power to build the Alaska we want to see.

Population(s) Served

Increase civic engagement and citizen participation

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Financials

Cook Inletkeeper
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Cook Inletkeeper

Board of directors
as of 5/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Patrick Dougherty

Michael O'Meara

Homer Electric Association Members Forum

Nancy Wainwright

Trustees for Alaska

Tom Evans

Subsistence Fisherman

Shannyn Moore

Alaska Public Radio Network

Peter Mjos

Providence Alaska Medical Center

Willow King

Patrick Dougherty

Anchorage Daily News (retired)

Mel Strydom

The Grog Shop

Tania Spurkland

Eve Downing

Student

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data