Humane Society of Central Oregon

Hand in Paw, Changing Lives

aka Bend Humane Society   |   Bend, OR   |  www.hsco.org

Mission

Strengthening the human-animal bond by advocating and compassionately caring for animals.

Ruling year info

1977

Executive Director

Sabrina Slusser

Main address

61170 SE 27th Street

Bend, OR 97702 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

93-0616957

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Veterinary Services (D40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

To end pet homelessness and suffering through education, adoption by striving to create stronger bonds between animals and humans.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Animal Protection and Welfare

Humane Society of Central Oregon is the only open admission shelter serving Central and Eastern Oregon. This means that we do not turn away an animal for any reason. We provide a public spay and neuter clinic to the public and offer low cost wellness exams and vaccines. We also operate a thrift store that generates 37% of the support for the shelter. We have 470 volunteers and youth programs such as Tails for Tales and summer camps.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Best Non Profit 2020

The Source Magazine

Affiliations & memberships

Best Non Profit Award by the Source Magazine 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Animal Protection and Welfare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These numbers include all animals that came to us that were either adopted, returned to owners, transferred to partner placement agencies or returned to field.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Animal Protection and Welfare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are surgeries performed on all animals going up for adoption, through our public spay and neuter clinic or community cats returned to the field.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We work toward the placement of all adoptable animals, which means that we strive to find homes for every medically treatable and behaviorally sound animal in our care. We are the only open-admission shelter in the tri-county area; never turning away a pet for any reason. We want to keep animals with their owners, so we offer a pet food assistance program as well as a voucher system for low cost spay and neuters in addition to operating the Bend Spay and Neuter Clinic. Through educational outreach, we have increased the awareness about responsible pet ownership, the importance of micro-chipping, licensing and tagging pets and increased volunteer hours spent working with animals. We have a high return to owner rate due to these efforts. We have been implementing the Association of Shelter Veterinarian (ASV) Guidelines since spring 2011. We have increased the medical care and treatment that we put into animals to make them more adoptable.
The Humane Society of Central Oregon prides itself on being transparent and calculates live release rate several different ways including Asilomar Accords and ASPCA methodologies. We are committed to continuing our ability to place 90%+ of the animals that come into our care.

Evaluating the relevancy of policies and how it helps us place animals.
Ensure all animals receive enrichment while in our care.
Develop and maintain strong partnerships with foster volunteers and transfer partners.
Strategically planning for the growth in the human and animal population that our area is expecting in the next decade.
Increasing the number of donors and fundraising revenue generated year over year.

We have strong executive, management and board leadership. We are a well-respected non-profit in our region with strong support from individual contributors. We have a diversified business model that includes revenues from our thrift store operations as well as service contracts for local law enforcement agencies. Our volunteer base has increased dramatically over the last eight years and volunteer hours served at our shelter and thrift store equate to almost 18 full-time positions. We have a strong partnership with Petco and have adoptable cats and small animals at their retail location.

We no longer euthanize healthy feral cats, but instead spay or neuter them and return them to their home areas. We have implemented over 550 of the ASV Guidelines. To accomplish implementing the remaining guidelines requires remodeling our shelter. We have increased our live release rate to 82% in fiscal year 13-14 to 91% in FY 2019.
Anticipated challenges include having the space and funding to deal with an increased number of surrendered animals in an economic downturn or a large hoarding case located in the tri-county area. As the economy improves, and the local rental property rents increase, those that are having a hard time making ends meet and can't afford the high cost of living in our area, may make difficult choices about providing veterinary care and retaining their pets. We are working on a safety net for these pet owners, especially with the COVID-19 overlay and housing eviction moratoriums expiring in 2021.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Suggestion box/email, Non profit survey for volunteers through UNCC,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Volunteers described that they didn't feel welcome by staff. We found out that staff were threatened by the work that volunteers could do and thought it might impact staff's hours. We then shared with staff the duties that were specific to volunteers and asked staff to start attending volunteer training as an hiring/onboarding component. We also did interviews with community members and other NPO's about gaps in services for pet owners and pets. We found that their is a need for a safety net program for people leaving domestic abuse situations so that they can get services while their pet is being taken care of. Emergency housing options in our area do not allow for pets to accompany their people.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Humane Society of Central Oregon
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Humane Society of Central Oregon

Board of directors
as of 11/18/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

David White

Marla Hacker

Jennifer Welander

St. Charles CFO

Lucy Belgum

Kenneth Betschart

Mary Biehn

Tara Duncan

St. Charles Healthcare

Golsima Hagen

Hurley-Re, P.C.

Julie Hotchkiss

OSU Foundation

Jennifer Keane

Valor Products

Mario Riquelme

Matthew Schiffman

Sarah Turner

Mazama Media

David White

TechSoft 3D

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/18/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/18/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.