Human Services

COUNCIL ON AGING OF CENTRAL OREGON

Aging Better, Together

Bend, OR

Mission

Our mission is to advocate for, empower and guide older adults and their loved ones through the journey of aging. Our vision is for all individuals to have opportunities to live with honor and dignity as they age, choosing the services and living arrangements that suit them best to “age in place” in a community they love. A trusted resource since 1975, we provide unbiased information, resources and services to more than 16,000 older adults and their families annually.

Ruling Year

1979

Executive Director

Susan Rotella

Main Address

373 NE Greenwood Av

Bend, OR 97701 USA

Keywords

older adults, senior services, case management, information & referral, nutrition, transportation

EIN

93-0661229

 Number

8515747098

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Seniors' Rights (R25)

Single Organization Support (T11)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

All of us are aging. Sometimes well, sometimes with challenge. It’s a fact of life. Many older adults rely on services to overcome isolation and barriers to health and to meet basic needs. People are living longer and having fewer children, so the world’s population is aging at an unprecedented rate. In Central Oregon, the population of adults over the age of 65 is forecast to grow by more than 50 percent from 2016 to 2040. Most older adults want to stay at home as they age and remain as independent as possible. However, many are also without support from family members and caregivers. We are focused on ensuring that aging in Central Oregon is defined by independence, well-being, dignity, and choice for all older adults, today and in the generations to come.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Meals on Wheels

Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC)

Family Caregiver Support Program

State Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA)

Oregon Project Independence (OPI)

Case Management

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of meals delivered

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens

Related program

Meals on Wheels

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Meals on Wheels and in-home Wellness checks delivered in 2019 by our groups of dedicated volunteers.

Number of meals served or provided

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Congregate (community) meals delivered in a social setting to provide nutrition and social connection for older adults.

Number of phone calls/inquiries

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens

Related program

Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Over 1,000 calls and inquiries answered each month from folks of all ages and income levels throughout our service area.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context notes

Over 400 adults volunteer to support our organization's activities every year. We could not provide the support we provide without their help!

Number of Subsidized Rides for Older Adults

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context notes

Subsidized rides for Older Adults to help them get places they need to be. This program is decreasing as we are working with partners to pilot point-to-point transit for our clients.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

As people live longer and have fewer children, the world’s population is aging at an unprecedented rate. In Central Oregon, the population of adults over the age of 65 is forecast to grow by 55 percent from 2016 to 2040. The Council on Aging of Central Oregon is committed to creating an age-friendly world to support this shift. We need to rethink how we construct and run our environments to support an aging population. Our Mission We advocate for, empower and guide older adults and their loved ones to live with independence and well-being. Our Vision A world that grows older better, together. Our Values Everything we do is guided by compassion, collaboration, reliability, integrity and respect. We are committed to equitable and inclusive services, programs and resources designed to meet immediate and direct need of older adults in our service territories.

To operationalize its vision and values, the Council on Aging seeks input from stakeholders, works collaboratively with partners, and enters into agreements with service providers. Stakeholders include seniors, family members, caregivers, and specific communities (rural, urban, low-income, high-risk, Latino, Spanish-speaking, and Native American); partners include DHS, APD, ADP, county offices, the Latino Community Association, the Let's Talk Diversity Coalition, the GeroLeadership Alliance, and all agencies represented in the ADRC; service providers include senior centers, COIC, and in-home health care and respite providers

The Council on Aging of Central Oregon is the federally designated Area Agency on Aging (AAA) for the planning and service area (PSA) of Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson Counties, and is part of the Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) for 10 counties in Central Oregon.

Incorporated as a 501(c)3 in June 1975, the Council on Aging has served seniors, caregivers, and adults with disabilities for more than four decades. To provide support services across a large geographic area that includes rural and urban communities, the Council coordinates planning and service provision with key agencies and organizations in its PSA. These include, most notably, DHS, APD, ADP, the CCO led by PacificSource's Health Council, mental and behavioral health departments in all three counties, and the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council that provides public transportation. Planning is coordinated through multi-disciplinary teams, ADRC collaborations, agreements (such as with COIC), community “huddles," and long-standing working relationships between the Council and other organization staff that have formalized into accepted practices. .

In this increasingly significant part of the state, it is imperative that we not only keep pace with – but stay ahead of – changing demographics and increased demand for service. To do so, we must understand the nature and extent of need among seniors, particularly high priority seniors as determined by economic and social considerations. .

Key factors that drive our strategic planning include:
• Extremely rapid growth in Deschutes County; as per U.S. Census Bureau data, the county's population aged 65+ grew by 40.0% from 2010 to 2015 due to aging of the existing population and an influx of new seniors
• Large geographic area that requires a distributed meal site model, including contracts with senior centers and vendors for nutrition services
• Rural and remote communities that offer few resources, require commitments of staff time and agency dollars to visit, have limited public transportation options, and add to the social isolation of seniors
• Increased cost of living, driven by rising costs of food, housing, and health care, that greatly impact seniors living on fixed and limited incomes
• Under-representation of seniors of color in our client base and need for improved equity, diversity and inclusion

All performance measures are tracked and reported and programs are evidence based.

Recent Accomplishments

• The Council on Aging recently purchased Bend's Community Center, which includes a commercial kitchen and dining facilities. The Meals on Wheels and congregate dining programs, currently managed from the Bend Senior Center, will transition to the new space in early 2019. Once there, congregate lunch frequency will increase from the current one day per week to five days a week, so that more seniors—and more meals—can be served.

• The Council on Aging expanded the reach of the Information & Resource (I&R) Referral program by staffing the Sister's Park and Recreation facility and the Bend Senior Center with an I&R specialist one day each week. Prineville and Madras I&R staffing programs will be implemented in Q2 2018. The Council on Aging anticipates increased client numbers for all services due to increased awareness from the onsite I&R programs.

External Reviews

Financials

COUNCIL ON AGING OF CENTRAL OREGON

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No