PLATINUM2024

Domestic Violence Resource Center

aka DVRC   |   Hillsboro, OR   |  www.dvrc-or.org

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Mission

The mission of the Domestic Violence Resource Center is to support and empower survivors and their children who are affected by domestic violence.

Ruling year info

1977

Executive Director

Ms Rosemary (Rowie) Taylor

Main address

Po Box 494

Hillsboro, OR 97123 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

93-0665804

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (P01)

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Victims' Services (P62)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

DVRC aims to address the issue of domestic violence in Washington County, Oregon and surrounding areas.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Advocacy & Empowerment

DVRC provides free advocacy to survivors of domestic violence. Advocacy services include: on-site filing assistance for protective orders (new petitions, renewals, dismissals, & modifications), court accompaniment for protective order-related hearings, safety planning, client crisis intervention & case management, resource referrals, application assistance with Address Confidentiality Program, client advocacy at DHS, South Asian Women's Empowerment advocacy (SAWERA), LatinX community advocacy, LGBTQ community advocacy, community outreach, education, & training. Advocacy services are provided in English, Spanish, Hindi, Punjabi, and Bengali.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Adults

DVRC provides free counseling to adult and child survivors of domestic violence. Adult counseling services include: 24-week domestic violence support groups, individual counseling, crisis intervention, safety planning, and resource referrals. Child counseling services include: individual counseling, art/play/sand therapy, parent/child counseling, safety planning, resource referrals, 12-week "Coping with Conflict" group for adolescents, and 12-week "Teen Healthy Relationships" group. Counseling services are provided in English and Spanish

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Children and youth
Adults

DVRC provides free shelter to survivors of domestic violence of all genders/identifications. DVRC runs 3 different sub-programs out of Shelter/Housing Services. Monika's House provides safe and confidential emergency shelter for adults, children and pets fleeing imminent physical danger. Mary Mac House provides transitional housing for survivors of domestic violence for up to one year. Sojourner's House provides permanent housing for survivors of domestic violence paired with wrap-around support services. Shelter/Housing Services include: confidential crisis shelter, transitional housing, permanent housing, individual and group domestic violence support, parenting groups and support, children's groups and support, safety planning, resource referrals, advocacy and case management, pet shelter, housing and employment support, financial planning.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Adults
Children and youth

DVRC provides domestic-violence-related informational seminars and training to organizations and agencies throughout the surrounding community, including local schools, mental health agencies, volunteer organizations and social services providers.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

DVRC's 24-hour crisis line is run out of DVRC's confidential emergency shelter, Monika's House. The crisis line is answered by certified advocates who are able to give support and referrals to those in crisis.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Diamond Collar Award 2022

Oregon Human Society

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of nights of safe housing provided to families of domestic violence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Shelter/Housing Services

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric reflects the number of nights survivors of domestic violence have stayed in DVRC shelters.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric shows DVRC's reach to the community.

Total number of counseling sessions performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Counseling Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric shows the number of individual counseling sessions DVRC Counselors held with survivors of domestic violence.

Number of safety plans created for domestic violence survivors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Advocacy & Empowerment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric shows the number of safety plans DVRC Advocates have created for survivors of domestic violence.

Number of crisis services provided for domestic violence survivors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric reflects the number of crisis services DVRC has provided to survivors of domestic violence.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

DVRC works to educate, support, and empower survivors of domestic violence. DVRC provides wrap-around services that are intended to give survivors a path to safety and self-sufficiency.

DVRC provides clients with wrap-around services to address the issues in their relationships. DVRC has the leading domestic violence advocacy program in Washington County, which often provides survivors with their first steps towards safety. DVRC's Community Advocacy Program helps survivors fill out protective orders, safety plan, connect with resources, and more. DVRC also is home to one of the largest domestic violence specific free counseling programs in the state of Oregon. DVRC provides counseling services in individual and group settings, and counseling services are provided to children and adults. Lastly, DVRC runs multiple domestic violence shelters in Washington County. Survivors who stay at our shelters are not only offered safety, but access to all of our programs to provide them with the skills they need upon exit. DVRC offers culturally specific and bilingual services to break down the barriers of the diverse community of Washington County.

DVRC has been meeting our goals for over 45 years and remains the leading domestic violence agency in Washington County, Oregon. DVRC also continually expands the programs offered in hopes of reaching those in need.

DVRC has been in business for over 45 years, making it one of the longest serving domestic violence agencies in the state of Oregon and longest serving domestic violence agency in Washington County. We strive to expand our services to meet client needs and have continued to do that. This year (2019), DVRC has expanded our Housing Services program to include a partnership with Washington County that will allow us to provide permanent housing in individual apartments to survivors of domestic violence.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome

Financials

Domestic Violence Resource Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Domestic Violence Resource Center

Board of directors
as of 02/26/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms Kristan Rinell

City of Tigard

Term: 2024 - 2025


Board co-chair

Melanie Musial

Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission

Nikki Hough

Hough Law

Bethany Marsh

Summa Real Estate

Jyoti Choudhary

Community Member

Tobi Crabtree

Groq, Inc.

Manjusha Gupte

Portland State University

Rita Habib

Sanofi Pharmaceuticals

Ambi Howell

Washington County

Adam Pena

Summa Real Estate

Juan Ugarte

Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/26/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/26/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.