RAPHAEL HOUSE OF PORTLAND

Portland, OR   |  www.raphaelhouse.com

Mission

We believe that everyone deserves to live a life free from violence. The mission of Raphael House is to engage our entire community in non-violent living through advocacy, education, and community outreach, and by providing a safe haven from domestic violence.

Ruling year info

1978

Principal Officer

Emmy Ritter

Main address

4110 SE Hawthorne Blvd. #503

Portland, OR 97214 USA

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EIN

93-0710963

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In Multnomah County, 28,000 women are physically abused by a partner each year, and 21,000 children witness domestic violence. While living with violence puts families at ongoing risk, the most dangerous time for survivors is immediately after leaving an abuser, when 75% of domestic violence-related homicides occur. The complex impacts of abuse persist well after a survivor has escaped an unsafe situation. In addition to physical harm, many survivors face isolation, depression, PTSD, and substance use—hindering their ability to achieve lasting stability. Exposure to violence is equally damaging for children, who may experience anxiety, developmental delays, and other challenges. Beyond negative health outcomes, domestic abuse can have severe impact on economic security—often leaving survivors with poor credit, limited work experience, and few financial resources. Raphael House responds to these intersecting barriers so families can recover, rebuild, and thrive in the long-term.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

General Information

For over 40 years, Raphael House has helped survivors of domestic violence and their families find safety, hope, and independence. Since opening our doors in 1977, we have provided uninterrupted access to emergency shelter in a confidential location, and we proudly offer trauma-informed, survivor-centered, and culturally responsive services. We serve a diverse community of adults and children primarily from the Portland metro area regardless of gender identity, ethnicity, disability, immigration status, primary language, or sexuality.

Raphael House’s programs continue to evolve to meet the changing needs of survivors and our community in creative and innovative ways. Today, we offer an array of programs that help survivors achieve permanent housing, employment, and stability and bring us closer to our vision for a world without domestic violence.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

Leaving an abusive partner is the most dangerous time for domestic violence survivors. That’s why our Emergency Shelter is located in a secure and confidential location, providing a safe haven to adults and children of all ages and gender identities. We provide each resident with necessities—including food, clothing, and toiletries—and offer robust case management, housing assistance, job counseling, tenant education classes, and supportive resources. Last year, 90% of survivors transitioned from our shelter directly into stable housing.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

We are here for survivors throughout their journey—as they move forward from our shelter and build lives without abuse. In our onsite Advocacy Center, current and past shelter residents and survivors from the wider community have ongoing access to a wide range of programs, including support groups in English and Spanish, family activities, wellness events, counseling, life skills and financial empowerment workshops, and comprehensive follow-up services such as crisis management, ongoing safety planning, housing supports, and more.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Survivors often face complex obstacles to finding safe housing, and Portland’s affordable rental crisis has made this a primary barrier for the majority of families we serve. Our housing programs provide one-on-one support to help participants find and maintain stable housing. As a result, 81% of families we serve are still in safe, stable housing a year after transitioning from our shelter.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Living with domestic violence can be just as traumatic for children as it is for their parent, and at Raphael House, more than half of the survivors we serve are children. Our Youth and Family Advocates provide individualized support to every child in our programs and offer youth-focused activities that help participants process their experiences and develop skills that will help them navigate the world in healthy ways.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Through our Prevention Education program, we offer workshops about dating and partner violence, practicing healthy relationships and consent, and identifying warning signs. Last year, we reached nearly 5,000 students and adults—moving us closer to our goal of stopping domestic violence before it starts. In addition, our Healthcare Advocate helps healthcare providers better respond to intimate partner violence, and our Recovery Mentors support survivors struggling with addiction as they transition from violence into safety.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of domestic violence survivors and community members served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Victims of crime and abuse

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of safe nights in our confidential emergency shelter

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of teens and adults who participate in Prevention Education workshops focused on equitable relationships and practicing consent

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults

Related Program

Community-Based Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of families who move from our shelter into stable housing or a safe alternative

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of survivors and their children who receive support, access resources, and/or take steps toward their ongoing safety and stability

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Victims of crime and abuse

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Pounds of food and fresh produce distributed to families

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Victims of crime and abuse

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Raphael House envisions a world without intimate partner violence, where everyone has the safety, hope, and independence they deserve. Every day, we work to achieve this by helping survivors find safety, regain a sense of control and autonomy, and end the cycle of violence for good. At the same time, we seek to drive lasting, systemic change by educating young people and our community at large about equitable relationships and consent - with the goal of stopping domestic violence before it starts.

Raphael House supports survivors every step of the way as they work toward safety and independence. In our confidential emergency shelter, families find a safe haven when they are in the greatest danger - immediately after fleeing an abuser. Our team of advocates works 24/7 to help families achieve their goals and secure safe, stable housing.

But the journey does not stop there. Through our onsite Advocacy Center, we continue to walk alongside families as they build new lives after abuse—offering support groups, food and emergency resources, youth programming, housing and employment assistance, counseling, and wellness activities that survivors can access for as long as needed. Much more than a resource hub, the Advocacy Center is a thriving community space where families build relationships, share resources, and ultimately develop a support system that extends beyond Raphael House.

While these comprehensive services drive positive change on an individual level, our innovative community-based programs address domestic violence on a broader scale. Since 2006, our Prevention Education program has worked “upstream” to teach teens about dating violence and consent—building an understanding of safe, equitable relationships so that abuse will never be part of their futures. Meanwhile, our Health Care Advocacy and Domestic Violence Recovery Mentor programs bring one-on-one support for survivors, in addition to training and consultation for service providers, to the healthcare and addiction/recovery sectors. These unique programs drive systems-level change that brings us closer to our vision for a world without violence.

Raphael House’s emphasis on serving survivors in the long-term is key to our success. We support families both during their stay in our shelter and for as long as needed after they move out, offering a consistent and trusted resource that helps participants stay safe, stable, and housed. Thanks to our lasting relationships with survivors and our commitment to following up with each participant, we are able to help prevent crises before they happen—covering a rent payment to stop an eviction, or helping a survivor quickly relocate if an abuser discovers their location. At the same time, we walk alongside survivors as they pursue long-term goals, working with the same families—sometimes over the course of many years—as they build a new career, secure legal residency for their family, or move into their first safe home. In doing so, we work to end the cycle of violence for good.

Our dedicated staff make these effective, long-term services possible. In a sector that is known for high turnover, five members of our seven-person management team have been with the agency for at least 10 years. Our Executive Director, Finance Director, and Program Managers are all active leaders and participants in domestic violence coalitions and bring strong community partnerships and deep investment in the sector to their roles. Across our agency, our staff have been recognized for their commitment to ending domestic violence. Two of our team members have been awarded the Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence PASSION Award; one was a finalist for the Skidmore Prize, which recognizes commitment to the Portland nonprofit sector; and three have received the Judge Stephen B. Herrell Award, which honors outstanding collaborative efforts to end family violence.

Finally, Raphael House’s firm grounding in trauma-informed care is the driving force behind our work. Considered a best practice for serving survivors, trauma-informed care calls us to recognize and respond to the impact of trauma on physical, emotional, and mental health and create a safe environment where survivors can rebuild a sense of control and autonomy. We firmly believe that survivors are the experts in their own experiences, and we strive to ensure that survivors’ needs and self-identified goals drive all we do. This survivor-centered and trauma-informed approach has shaped us into an agency that is unwaveringly responsive and accountable to the families we serve.

Since 1977, Raphael House has offered emergency shelter to survivors and their children in a confidential location--providing a vital safe haven when families need it most. Over the years, we have evolved our programming to meet the changing needs of survivors and our community in creative and innovative ways. We launched our Prevention Education program in 2006; today, thousands of teens and adults learn about safe, equitable relationships and consent each year with support from trained advocates. In 2010, we converted the unfinished upper floor above our shelter into our Advocacy Center, which has since become a thriving hub for programming and our platform for supporting families in the long-term. We expanded our housing services in 2016 with the launch of our Shelter to Stability program; added a sex trafficking prevention initiative and survivor-led addiction recovery services in 2018; and developed a unique partnership with Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) in 2019 that stations an advocate onsite at a local healthcare clinic. As we continue to evolve to better serve our community, we are committed to ensuring survivor voices and needs shape all that we do.

In 2020 alone, these programs contributed to the following impact:
*3,273 survivors and community members served
*9,015 safe nights spent in our confidential emergency shelter
*138 Prevention Education workshops delivered to 2,046 teens and adults
*$368,644 in direct client assistance distributed to help survivors cover critical expenses—such as rent and utility bills—and secure or retain safe housing
*37,503 pounds of food and 5,500 diapers given out to help families meet basic needs
*798 home visits completed by advocates to deliver food, hygiene supplies, activity kits for kids, and other essentials to survivors and their children amid the pandemic

Financials

RAPHAEL HOUSE OF PORTLAND
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

RAPHAEL HOUSE OF PORTLAND

Board of directors
as of 3/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Nicole Frisch

First Tech Federal Credit Union

Matthew Tate

No Affiliation

Krista Tappan

Portland Business Journal

Tracy Curtis

Wells Fargo

Jane Henderson

Retired

Blerina Kotori

Tonkon Torp LLP

Susanna Taylor Stewart

Brown & Brown Northwest Insurance

AJ Ijaz

The Standard

Michelle Erickson

Umpqua Bank

Courtney Lee

Oxley & Associates

Lucas Diaz

Ludia Consulting

Christine Furrer

Fischer Family Law, PC

Sasha Petrova

Perkins Coie LLP

Michelle Poli-Tonkin

Brown & Brown Northwest Insurance

Kelsey Rozell

Alliant Systems

Nicole Frisch

First Tech Federal Credit Union

Chloe Mason

Sports and Fitness Model

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/25/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data