Habitat for Humanity Portland Region

aka Habitat for Humanity Portland/Metro East and Willamette West Habitat for Humanity merged Jan 1 2021   |   Portland, OR   |  http://www.habitatportlandregion.org

Mission

At Habitat for Humanity, we believe that everyone deserves a stable and affordable place to call home. Founded in 1981, we have built and repaired homes in partnership with over 2,000 people across the Portland region. With plans to triple the number of people we serve every year, we are invested in creating a region where everyone has the opportunity to build a better life.

Ruling year info

1987

President & CEO

Mr. Steve Messinetti

Main address

PO Box 11527 1478 NE Killingsworth Street

Portland, OR 97211 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Habitat for Humanity Portland/Metro East

Willamette West Habitat for Humanity

EIN

93-0801200

NTEE code info

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

Voluntarism Promotion (T40)

Christian (X20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The housing crisis has created the largest gap in affordable housing our city has ever seen. We know firsthand that increased housing costs are a poverty driver, with “households in poverty at high risk of living in unstable or substandard housing” (Poverty in Multnomah County Report). The 2016 Federal Poverty Level for a family of four is $24,300. According to the County, 1 in 3 residents are in poverty and cannot meet basic needs and 23% of children in the County live in poverty. While the population has increased by 26% over the past 10 years, the poverty rate has grown by double that amount (65%), with the increase highest among people of color. With more low-income families being displaced due to a lack of adequate and affordable housing options, and with even less homeownership opportunities available, the varied services that Habitat for Humanity Portland/Metro East provides is needed now more than ever.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Homeownership Program

Habitat’s education program uses a research-based curriculum and consists of 20 hours of intensive family finance and mortgage education, plus training on homeownership associations, taxes, home maintenance and other critical topics. This program is mandatory for all mortgage holders, and is a strong factor in our success, as demonstrated by having only one foreclosure in the past decade.

·         8-hour HUD-certified financial fitness course, which covers budgeting, savings and debt in relation to homeownership, along with general financial management.

·         4 hour mortgage 101 course that provides detail on escrow, taxes, insurance, the costs of homeownership, equity and appreciation, foreclosure prevention and other topics.

·         4-hour course on taxes, including home-related credits/deductions, depreciation and other topics.

·         4-hour training on homeowners' associations, condo fees, and management.

·         90-minute workshop on energy conservation practices. 

·         60-minute training on how to choose and work with a contractor.

·         3 hours on preventive maintenance and home repair; home warranty; and community resources.

·         30-45 minutes of training each day on site, including OSHA-compliant safety briefing, equipment how-to, and review of building materials and methods. Buyers learn and perform a range of tasks.

·         Optional trainings include topics like home weatherization, avoiding predatory lending and gardening.

 

In addition, the Homeownership Program tracks that families complete a minimum of 300 sweat equity hours prior to purchasing their homes.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

Habitat engages over 3,500 volunteers in the Portland Metro area each year to learn about housing and economic issues and actually work alongside families to build homes. People of all incomes and professional backgrounds come together and develop a collaborative spirit through Habitat, a benefit that transcends the build itself. Our Volunteer Program also works with several Specialty Builds, groups of volunteers with similar interests who raise funds and help with the construction of a home.

Faith Build - Various faith communities
Pride Build - The gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community and friends
Women Build - Women of all ages and backgrounds
Youth United Build - Youth ages 5-25

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our largest program, Construction works to build the homes that our sold to our partner families.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

Habitat is proud to launch the Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative (NRI), a block by block approach to building stronger neighborhoods. NRI will help serve more families in the Portland Metro area with an expanded array of products, services and partnerships. Habitat will respond to community priorities and work hand-in-hand with residents to revive their neighborhood and enhance their quality of life. NRI is more than just new Habitat products. This is a holistic approach to creating change in our neighborhoods that have the greatest need for stability. This means joining residents, nonprofits, businesses and local government to discover what is needed most in a neighborhood, and helping to implement a shared vision of revitalization.
The goal is to increase the number of families served annually from 30 to 100.

Population(s) Served
Families

The Home Repair and Preservation Program helps low-income homeowners located in Cully, Habitat’s current Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative (NRI) focus neighborhood, restore and maintain their homes. Habitat will partner with homeowners to alleviate critical health and safety issues and complete needed home improvement projects. This program is part of the Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative’s long-term commitment to revitalizing Cully in partnership with residents and Living Cully nonprofit partners.

Population(s) Served
Families

Where we work

Awards

Affiliate of Distinction of Distinction 2015-2017 2015

Habitat for Humanity International

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of housing units built

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Construction Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people no longer living in unaffordable, overcrowded housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homeownership Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As a result of our organization's 5-Year Strategic Plan, we seek to triple the number of people we serve by the year 2021. That means every year we will be helping more than 1,500 people to access safe, affordable and stable housing on a permanent basis. Below are some key highlights:

• Build and rehab 175 homes for first-time homebuyers
• Provide critical home repairs on 160 owner-occupied homes
• Purchase and develop 200 lots that will retain permanent affordability into the future
• Engage the community in 25,000 volunteer opportunities, more than doubling annual volunteer engagement
• Reduce racial disparities in homeownership with at least 80% of all new Habitat homebuyers being people of color
• Expand Neighborhood Revitalization Program to two focus neighborhoods
• Expand our homeowner education program to include comprehensive post-purchase education that supports financial well-being and home maintenance.
• Open three additional ReStores, increasing annual profit by 50%
• Inspire Habitat supporters to advocate for smart housing policies and systems
• Support Habitat’s global mission by building 280 homes in Ethiopia and El Salvador

By offering a varied source of programs that seek to serve our community holistically and at greater scale, we are reimagining and invigorating the services we provide.

Habitat for Humanity provides a unique opportunity for hardworking people and families to build and buy their own homes. Our houses are sold at no profit to our partner homeowners with an affordable mortgage. The mortgage lengths vary depending on income; Habitat adjusts the length of the mortgage so that the monthly mortgage payment (which includes taxes, insurance, and condo fees, if applicable) is no more than 30% of the homeowner’s gross monthly income at the time of sale. Habitat for Humanity homeowner mortgage payments are put into a revolving fund that helps pay for construction of future houses in the Portland/Metro East community. The pre-approval selection of homeowners who will purchase houses from Habitat for Humanity Portland/Metro East is done by the Family Selection Committee in a way that does not discriminate because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, sexual orientation, age, gender identity or national origin. We also do not discriminate because all or part of the applicant’s income is derived from public assistance programs.

The Home Repair and Preservation Program helps low-income homeowners located in Cully, Habitat’s current Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative (NRI) focus neighborhood, restore and maintain their homes. Habitat will partner with homeowners to alleviate critical health and safety issues and complete needed home improvement projects. This program is part of the Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative’s long-term commitment to revitalizing Cully in partnership with residents and Living Cully nonprofit partners. While new home construction remains at the core of what we do, Habitat cannot transform neighborhoods through new construction alone. By launching NRI, we are able to work more intensively within a neighborhood to meet resident needs and aspirations, ultimately improving the quality of life for not only residents of these neighborhoods, but for the city as a whole.

Habitat will improve the lives of families through new services:

• New Home Construction: Address the need to create new affordable homeownership opportunities in the focus area.
• Rehabs: Addresses the glut of abandoned or foreclosed properties by restoring homes and selling to hardworking families.
• Critical Home Repair: Addresses extensive interior and exterior repairs for existing low-income homeowners. This may include roof replacement, electrical and plumbing, and handicap accessibility renovations to address health and safety concerns.
• Home Preservation: Preserves the exterior of homes by focusing on minor repairs, painting and landscaping.
• Weatherization: Improves energy efficiency and indoor air quality for existing low-income homeowners.

Habitat's ability of reaching greater goals lie in our skill at adapting to changing markets and incorporating more innovative and effective ideas. Through innovation we will be implementing a new business model that will offer greater impact. Below are some of the new ways we are working to accomplish our goals.

A new way to lend: Historically Habitat has been the bank, providing affordable mortgages to families who then made payments back to Habitat over the course of 30 years. Now we will partner with community-focused banks that are longtime supporters of Habitat’s work to provide affordable mortgages to Habitat homebuyers. The funds Habitat receives at closing will be immediately invested in creating additional homeownership opportunities with families in need of a decent place to live.

A new way to plan for the future: Portland’s housing market is booming, requiring us to quickly find ways to become better stewards of our land and more intentional about how Portland grows. Habitat is committed to a Portland that is affordable to hardworking, low-income families—not just today, but for generations to come. Our new permanent-affordability model will allow Habitat homeowners to continue building equity in their homes, and it also ensures the home is affordable to the next buyer. This guarantees affordable neighborhoods into the future.

A new way to strengthen communities: We are working with hardworking, underserved families on their journey to homeownership. The average Habitat homeowner earns $35,000 annually. While Habitat will continue to focus on homebuyers with low incomes, we will begin providing homeownership opportunities to families earning up to $55,000, identified by partner nonprofit housing organizations. This is a response to a housing market that is unaffordable to a majority of Portland’s working families. This will also create mixed-income communities that studies indicate have the highest long-term likelihood of building strength and stability.

A new way to advocate: We are investing in advocacy efforts that further our goal of providing access to affordable homeownership. Advocates will ensure that our housing crisis is front and center in the hearts and minds of elected officials along with the importance of investing in the entire continuum of housing that Portland needs to be a thriving and diverse community.

A new way to advance equity, diversity & inclusion: We are committed to creating opportunities for all people to reach their full potential. An equity analysis will inform a comprehensive, organization-wide equity plan. From examining our hiring and board recruitment processes, to strengthening our team by investing in ongoing diversity and equity education, this work will be deeply ingrained in our organization.

Thanks to support from the community, we're on track to reach our goals and have established a solid foundation from which to build exponential growth. Last year alone, 78 people experienced strength and stability through Habitat’s affordable homeownership and repair programs. We also have 34 new homes are under construction, as we seek to build high quality, energy efficient houses that will serve homeowners for years to come. Additionally, 10 homes have been repaired over the past year. Home repairs are critical to the prevention
of further displacement of low-income homeowners. From roof replacements to replacing windows and doors, we provide a variety of repairs that stabilize homeowners in the Cully neighborhood. Habitat was able to buy and rehabilitate 5 vacant houses to create affordable, stable
homeownership for qualified low-income families. And speaking to our commitment and vision to create a world where everyone, everywhere has a decent and affordable place to call home, we were able to build 44 homes with our sister affiliates in El Salvador and Ethiopia. We see great strides happening in our city and we are excited to continue this growth well into the future.

Financials

Habitat for Humanity Portland Region
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Habitat for Humanity Portland Region

Board of directors
as of 6/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ian Gordan

Regence

Jon Bowdoin

Deloitte

Mark Waller

BridgeWorks Capital-Founder

Dawn Holden

Banner Bank

Noma Hanlon

HB Design

Mark New

New & Neville Real Estate Services

Simon Whang

Portland City Attorney’s Office

Steve Messinetti

Habitat for Humanity Portland/Metro East

Jonathan Bennett

Dunn Carney LLP

Eileen Frack

Daimler Trucks North America

Traci Rieckmann

Greenfield Health

Nat Borchers

NDB Real Estate

Reggie Guyton

State Farm

Melody Rose

Marylhurst University

Rich Brown

Bank of America

Ryan Ross

Williams Sonoma

Michelle Da Rosa

Michelle Da Rosa Land & Condo Law

Lauren Noecker Robert

NBP Capital, LLC

Kevin Erdahl

Standard Insurance Company

Lynn Peterson

Smart Growth America

Yasmine Foroud

Windermere Realty Trust

Jennifer Quist

JLQ Hospitality

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes