THE FRESHWATER TRUST

We fix freshwater ecosystems.

aka The Freshwater Trust   |   Portland, OR   |  www.thefreshwatertrust.org

Mission

The Freshwater Trust is a group of problem solvers that design and implement data-driven, science-based solutions that protect and restore rivers.

Ruling year info

1989

President

Mr. Joe Whitworth

Main address

700 SW Taylor Street Suite 200

Portland, OR 97205 USA

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Formerly known as

Oregon Trout

Oregon Water Trust

EIN

93-0843521

NTEE code info

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Fisheries (D33)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our rivers are the backbone of our country. Yet decades of treating a finite resource as infinite has had severe consequences. More than half the rivers in America do not function as they should, and that number is expected to increase as the threats of climate change become more severe. There are deadly algae blooms and lead-contaminated drinking water, taps running dry, and critical industries and species at risk. We can and must secure a future where clean, abundant freshwater resources support our environment, economy and society, but to do so, we have to restore our waterways faster than we degrade them. This requires systems change, collaboration, targeted and tracked actions, and integration to accelerate and advance the ways in which we are fixing rivers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Water Quality & Habitat Restoration

Through the modeling of a watershed’s flow, terrain and species, we’re able to choose and target the best solutions to address a problem.

Freshwater ecosystems make up less than one percent of the Earth’s total surface area and incredibly, support more than 100,000 unique species. Yet freshwater ecosystems are among the world’s most endangered. Climate change, pollution and other human impacts have taken a dramatic toll.

Whether placing logs strategically instream to improve a river’s complexity or planting trees for shade to lower water temperature, we carry out science-based, ecologically-sound projects to restore habitat function.

By modeling a watershed’s flow, terrain and species, we’re able to choose and target the best solutions to address a problem. Then, working with local partners, we get our boots wet, employing a variety of techniques to ensure cleaner, healthier waterways.

Population(s) Served

We know working lands and healthy rivers can coexist. California may be today’s ground zero for water scarcity in America. But if recent years have shown us anything, it’s that the challenge of keeping a river full and flowing is one shared across the American West.

We understand that while agriculture may account for more than 80 percent of consumptive water in many Western states, we cannot simply trade it for conservation. We must implement practical, workable solutions that work for both fish and farmers. And we must do this in the face of a changing climate. We know working lands and healthy rivers can coexist.

We work hand-in-hand with willing farmers, ranchers and other landowners to develop voluntary, incentive-based water management strategies that balance out-of-stream needs for water like irrigation with the need to keep water flowing for water quality and habitat protection.

Population(s) Served

Environmental uplift can provide a robust picture of the project’s true ecological value.
Research, innovation and technology are the driving forces behind ensuring the actions we take deliver quantifiable positive outcomes for a river. We analyze data, model outcomes, and develop rigorous systems and protocols to quantify the environmental benefits of every restoration action.

We call these benefits “uplift.” Uplift is calculated by measuring the conditions of an ecosystem prior to a restoration project and then modeling the conditions that will result after a project has been implemented.

Calculating the environmental uplift for a potential restoration site can provide a robust picture of the project’s true ecological value, and help to prioritize implementation across a watershed. After the project is implemented, we use technology like our StreamBank Monitoring App to conduct long-term project monitoring to ensure that the project site is on-track to achieve the modeled benefits.

Population(s) Served

We work with regulated entities to understand and develop compliance solutions based on quantified conservation actions. The Freshwater Trust works with municipalities, utilities, agencies and private businesses to offset their impacts on rivers and streams, evaluate habitat and water quality conditions, and optimize conservation investments. We analyze current conditions, design innovative compliance programs, and work directly with landowners, farmers and conservation professionals to offer collaborative solutions for improving water quality. In addition, in circumstances where a compliance program is still developing, our team of scientists, attorneys and restoration professionals can assist in laying the necessary scientific and policy groundwork that makes these programs possible.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of list subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our monthly e-newsletter BlueNews goes to approximately 4,200 people each month.

Number of press articles published

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2019, we had approximately 31 media hits.

Number of return website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We average between 2,500 and 3,000 per month. In 2018, over the course of the full calendar year, we had a total of 29,654 users to the site, 29,266 were new and 4,769 were returning.

Number of national media pieces on the topic

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of first-time donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Households not individuals

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Households not individuals

Number of donors retained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Households not individuals

Gallons of water saved over due to the organization's services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We saved 70,700 gallons per minute during the 2019 irrigation season

Number of tons of sediment pollution reduced

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of multi-year grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are working for a resilient future where freshwater resources can support our environment, economy and society for generations to come and be resilient enough to withstand the pressures of a changing climate.

We’re pioneers of a new approach. “Quantified Conservation” is about using data and technology to ensure every restoration and conservation action taken translates to a net positive outcome. First, we work to understand the limiting factors driving degradation in a watershed and what a healthy status looks like. Then, we prioritize opportunities into scenarios that achieve benefits for a watershed. After optimization, we work with local partners and willing landowners to restore habitat in key places, to adapt best management practices, or to keep more water in rivers and streams that need it. Along the way, we track how every action we take is making a difference for our freshwater resources and our
communities. Only through strategic action and a laser focus on achieving holistic results can we match the scale of freshwater problems in our country on a timeline that matters.

With more than 35 years of on-the-ground experience, The Freshwater Trust is the largest restoration-focused organization in the Pacific Northwest, and the second largest conservation group based in Oregon.

We have a unique mix of in-house staff expertise, ranging from fish biologists and hydrologists to GIS experts, business and conservation systems analysts, attorneys, and ecosystem services analysts . The Freshwater Trust also has strong partnerships with federal, state and local agencies, non-profit organizations, community-based groups and private landowners. In addition to its headquarters in Portland, Oregon, satellite offices exist in Ashland, Union and Enterprise. The Freshwater Trust also recently established offices in Boise, Idaho and Sacramento, California, where large initiatives are underway.

We currently offer a number of services, including habitat restoration, flow restoration, and compliance solution programs for regulated entities. Our science team uses the latest tools, technologies and models that ensure restoration is happening more effectively and strategically.

Have Accomplished:
--Received a U.S. patent for Streambank®, a web-based platform for river restoration
--Created the largest restoration fund in the country through Oregon lottery dollars
--Awarded more than $2 million to advance the field of restoration through research
--Received the 2013 U.S. Water Prize for our innovative water quality trading program
--Received special recognition in 2012 for advancing water quality trading by Oregon Association of Clean Water Agencies
--Conducted 238 flow restoration projects since 1993, involving over 650 transactions
--Partner with more than 200 landowners across Oregon to restore streamflow in eight major basins
--Restore between 98 to 163 million gallons per minute each irrigation season
--Helped develop the Fifteenmile Action to Stabilize Temperature (FAST), a voluntary program that helps keep more water instream for endangered fish when death stream temperatures are forecasted
--A minimum flow agreement in the Lostine River to maintain 15 cfs instream during critical months, in coordination with efforts from local basin partners, has helped support the recovery of the river’s Chinook salmon run from under 50 adults in the early 1990s to over 2,000 adults in 2014.
--11,081 functional linear feet of stream function restored
--816,838,881 kilocalories per day of heat blocked from warming rivers
--211 lbs. of phosphorus prevented from entering rivers per year
--1,717 lbs. of nitrogen prevented from entering rivers per year
--477,708 lbs. of sediment prevented from entering rivers per year
--Received mention from President Obama during the White House Conference on Conservation
-- Partnered with Google to discover how using advanced cameras could help survey waterways.
-- Awarded $350,000 from the Rockefeller Foundation to build a water budgeting prototype in California.
-- Received $150,000 for restoration work in the John Day River Basin from the Bella Vista Foundation.
-- Finalist in Imagine H2O's California Water Policy Challenge.
-- Partnered with Portland State University and Oregon State University to test how drones can help monitor streamside health.
-- Awarded Portland Monthly's Light a Fire Award.
--More than $2.8 million was awarded to fund our conservation tools in 2019.
--Partnered with more than 15 municipalities and regulated entities to develop and implement watershed-scale conservation programs.
--Generated the first compliance-grade phosphorus credits in Oregon through a partnership with PacifiCorp and the Klamath Basin Rangeland Trust

Not Yet Accomplished:
--Ongoing advancement of methods, protocols, innovation and technology that will help us fix more rivers faster
--Broad adoption of water quality trading as a natural infrastructure solution across the country
--Water conservation strategies and agricultural best management practices are broadly adopted
--Key sectors use quantified conservation to align the environment with the economy and increase the scale of restoration work

Financials

THE FRESHWATER TRUST
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

THE FRESHWATER TRUST

Board of directors
as of 8/20/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Scott Sandbo

Pacific Crest Securities


Board co-chair

Pat Reiten

Berkshire Hathaway Energy

Scott Sandbo

Pacific Crest Securities

Paul Fortino

Perkins Coie

Brad Preble

Carr Auto Group

Margaret Tuchmann

Morgan Stanley Wealth Advisor Group

Tim Boyle

Columbia Sportswear Company

Hank Ashforth

The Ashforth Company

Gary Fish

Deschutes Brewery

David Chen

Equilibrium Capital Group

Scott Demorest

Acme Business Consulting

Randy Labbe

Kerr Pacific

David Laurance

Confluence Rx

William Neuhauser

FBR CoMotion Venture Capital, LP

Michael Pohl

ThinkAnalytics, Imagine Communications & Ascent Media Group

Pat Reiten

Pacific Power

Marty Myers

Threemile Canyon Farms

Peter Doubleday

Ernst & Young

Tony Trunzo

Gryphon Investors

Deb Hatcher

A to Z Wineworks

Marcelino Alvarez

Uncorked Studios

Margaret Donavan Cormier

The Standard Insurance Company

Molly McCabe

HaydenTanner

Kim Malek

Salt & Straw

Gia Schneider

Natel Energy

Dr. Sara Spangelo

Swarm Technologies

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/17/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/17/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.