PLATINUM2024

FOOD for Lane County

Because no one should be hungry.

Eugene, OR   |  http://www.foodforlanecounty.org/

Mission

FOOD For Lane County (FFLC) is a nonprofit food bank dedicated to reducing hunger by engaging our community to create access to food. We accomplish this by soliciting, collecting, rescuing, growing, preparing and packaging food for distribution to a network of social service agencies and programs, and through public awareness, education and community advocacy.

Ruling year info

1986

Chair, Board of Directors

Chris Hemmings

Main address

770 Bailey Hill Rd

Eugene, OR 97402 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

93-0888347

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2019.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

FOOD For Lane County is a nonprofit food bank dedicated to reducing hunger by engaging our community to create access to food. We accomplish this by soliciting, collecting, rescuing, growing, preparing and packaging food for distribution to a network of social service agencies and programs, and through public awareness, education and community advocacy. Making food easily available to the people who need it is at the core of our commitment to serve. FFLC serves the emergency food needs for the 383,000 people living in Lane County, Oregon. The 7.6 million pounds of food distributed in FY23-23 resulted in six million meals for those in need. Our programs help low-income individuals and families obtain nutritious food when they cannot afford to buy it. FFLC is widely recognized for both developing creative solutions to alleviate hunger and for supporting the empowerment of clients, partners and large numbers of community volunteers in the development and promotion of self-sufficiency.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Distribution Network

Making food easily available to the people who need it is at the core of FOOD For Lane County’s commitment to serve. Donated food is distributed through emergency food pantries, meal sites, shelters, and non-emergency programs. This countywide network of providers, many of them volunteers, are on the front lines and stand between families in need and severe hunger.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors
Children and youth
Families

FOOD For Lane County operates The Dining Room, a meal site in downtown Eugene. The Dining Room provides free hot dinners four nights a week.   In addition to offering meals, this innovative restaurant serves large portions of dignity in a community-oriented atmosphere.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

FOOD For Lane County’s two gardens--- the GrassRoots Garden and the Youth Farm---provide on-site gardening opportunities and workshops, while growing fresh, organic produce for distribution through the FOOD For Lane County Network. County residents may also access fresh produce by purchasing it at the youth-run farm stand and through a community-supported agriculture program.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

FOOD For Lane County operates the largest Summer Food Program in Oregon, which provides nutritious meals five days a week to children during the months when the National School Lunch Program is not in session. Staff and volunteers serve meals at schools, parks and community centers located throughout Lane County during the summer months.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

Meals on Wheels is more than just a meal! Friendly volunteers deliver a nourishing, freshly prepared noontime meal that is nutritionally balanced to provide one-third of a senior’s recommended daily nutrients. Volunteers have time for a brief chat and a safety check. Seniors who live alone feel more secure knowing that someone is checking on them regularly.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with disabilities
Economically disadvantaged people

Through our partnership with Oregon State University/Lane County Extension, FFLC provides samples and nutritious recipes at food pantries, and offers nutrition education through cooking classes, grocery store tours, and outreach events. Program volunteers demonstrate how to prepare healthy, low-cost meals.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families
Parents
Children and youth

Extra Helping prevents hunger by providing a weekly serving of bread and produce for residents in low-income housing complexes. Extra Helping builds community involvement and ownership by mobilizing resident volunteers to organize and administer the program.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Children and youth

The Senior Grocery Program is a once monthly food box (or bag) given to low-income seniors. The box is filled with nutritious staple foods necessary to a balanced diet. The program is currently serving 468 seniors.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

Produce Plus brings high-quality fresh fruits and vegetables to people in need at community and neighborhood locations. For the recipients, the experience is similar to shopping at a farmers' market without the cost.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

The Mobile Pantry program focuses on serving marginalized communities and geographic areas with high need in an effort to supplement and promote other hunger-relief agencies. Through collaborations with partners and local communities, the mobile pantry will work to increase food security through an equitable, sustainable, and accessible mobile pantry model while incubating self-sufficient local solutions to hunger.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Families
LGBTQ people
Children

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America

Oregon Food Bank Network 1988

United Way of Lane County 1988

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Food Distribution Network

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric is the number of individuals who accessed food from the emergency food box program.

Number of meals delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Older adults

Related Program

Meals on Wheels

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Strategic Plan for 2021-2023 includes the following framing pillars:
1. Sustainable Funding and Food Supply
2. Access and Equity
3. Agility and Resilience
4. Community Impact

Goals for each pillar are:

Sustainable Funding and Food Supply:
• Build sustainable sources of funding to support ongoing operations and new program development.
• Diversify funding sources to reduce risk.
• Complete Capital funding campaign to drive future expansion.
• Build strong food supplies through donations, purchase, gardens and the cultivation of new and existing partnerships.
• Continue to diversify food options to meet cultural desires of various populations.
• Capitalize on existing and emerging funding opportunities from pandemic and other community impacts.

Access and Equity:
• Ensure that the most vulnerable populations have access to food.
• Build strong partnerships with organizations that serve vulnerable populations to deliver access.
• Build strong capacity to meet community food needs through partnerships, volunteers and employees.
• Train and educate staff on DEI and ensure DEI best practices are being adopted.

Agility and Resilience:
• Employees are FFLC. Ensure there is high employee engagement and morale.
• Build flexible staffing/volunteer models that support staff through emergency and peak demand times.
• Leverage data as a part of leadership.
• Use data to drive efficiency, enhance access, and enhance cultural sensitivities.
• Adopt agile planning methodologies within the Board and Management that allow FFLC to iterate and pivot through highly unpredictable times.
• Establish expansion plans that address staffing, programs, and partnerships to deliver results.

Community Impact:
• Drive community impact by reducing hunger in Lane County—and be able to demonstrate those results
• Collect meaningful data to drive insights that inform priorities for impact. We can’t do everything; so how do we choose the highest and best use of our resources
Measure community impact and understand effects on regions and people. Incorporate an equity lens in analytic analyses and decision making.
• Redouble efforts to gather and leverage data, exploring:
- What are the trends and predictors of new needs or progress made?
- How do we understand the complexities that give rise to hunger?
- How are our programs helping?
- What are the developmental milestones for making lasting changes that break cycles of poverty and oppression?

Sustainable Funding and Food Supply
1: Food Supply: Explore and develop opportunities to ensure that FOOD for Lane County—and by extension its partners—has an adequate, varied and sustainable food supply.
2: Sustainable Funding: Building on FFLC’s foundation of strong community support, momentum from the capital campaign, and engagement of new supporters (prompted by COVID-19), we plan to design and implement an innovative Development Operating Plan to guide the work of generating sustainable funding for the continual growth, creation or redesign of programs by engaging the community to create access to food.

Access and Equity
1: Equity Planning and Implementation: Complete the development of a comprehensive organizational equity plan and strategy, and incorporate and integrate equity considerations in all aspects of organizational life.
2: Food Distribution: Develop an improved equity-oriented model for working with partner agencies, moving beyond ‘monitoring for compliance’ to ‘collaborating for community impact.’

Agility and Resilience
1: Capital Campaign: Complete the $9.0 million capital campaign fundraising effort; plan and complete the Bailey Hill building renovation [$2.5 million].
2: Staff and Organizational Systems and Culture: Improve organizational systems for staff development, workload management, and organizational culture.

Community Impact
1: Program Development: Develop programs that increase access to food and programs that use food to help address the root causes of hunger and food insecurity
2: Data Systems: FFLC needs to be able to effectively use data to inform internal decision-making regarding funding, programs, and food distribution; to tell the story of the work we and our partner agencies do; and to understand the experience of partner agencies and our end users about whether food assistance provided by FFLC is available, accessible and meets their needs.

FFLC has been feeding those who are in need of food for 39 years. Our programs and services accomplished the following during fiscal year 2022-23: Distributed 5.3 million pounds of food to 35 pantries in our Food Distribution Network, which provided 69,441 people with Emergency Food Boxes; served approximately 27,597 meals to children this summer at 32 sites through the Summer Food Program; rescued, prepared and packaged a record amount of food—more than a million pounds—through our Food Rescue Express (FREX) program; In 2022 our Gardens Program grew and harvested over 145,000 pounds of fresh, organic produce from FFLC's two educational gardens. In FY 22-23, we delivered over 12,500 Weekend Snack Packs to elementary school-aged children in need; the Extra Helping program provided 921 low-income households access to fresh produce and dairy items; we distributed pounds of fruits and vegetables to 44,674 people through the Trillium Produce Plus Program and served 42769 meals to 3,402 people through our Dining Room Program.
FFLC programs and partnerships respond to the immediate crisis of hunger while other programs help individuals and families address chronic food insecurity through self-sufficiency and education programs. The majority of the food we distribute is given to clients at our partner agencies through our Emergency Food Box Program. The eligibility criteria for this program are: household income at or below 300% of the federal poverty level or currently participating in the Food Stamp Program (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - SNAP), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Social Security Income (SSI) or Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP).
As the second largest food bank in Oregon, FFLC is a member of the Oregon Food Bank Network, United Way of Lane County and a distribution partner of Feeding America, the national food bank network.

FOOD For Lane County has successfully met the food needs for the emergency food system for over 38 years. We have adapted and responded to changes in community demographics by expanding outreach to global majority populations, to rural areas and to seniors and children. Our Mobile Pantry Program focuses on serving marginalized communities and geographic areas with high need in an effort to nimbly meet these communities’ needs and to supplement and promote other local social services agencies.
We have responded to changes in food supply by creating produce-only programs, sourcing and growing our own food, and purchasing food. Nutrition education offers participants a chance to learn to use the food they get from a food program, and gardening education teaches participants to grow their own food. Our Work Experience Program provides short-term vocational training to create a stronger pathway to employment for unhoused (yet sheltered) individuals in our warehouse, for people referred by local shelters.
Donors' generosity and belief in what our community can accomplish working together made it possible for FOOD For Lane County to complete our five-year $10 million Building to Serve capital campaign in the fall of 2022, doubling our capacity to receive, process, store, and distribute food.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

FOOD for Lane County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FOOD for Lane County

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Chris Hemmings

Summit Bank

Term: 2023 - 2024

Justin King

King Estate Winery

Tiffany Mellow

Perkins and Company, PC

Keri Garcia

Moss Adams

Laurie Hauber

University of Oregon School of Law

Chris Hemmings

Summit Bank

Samantha Snyder

PakTech

Sarah Stapleton

University of Oregon College of Education

Michelle Thurston

FFLC Client

Caity Hatteras

FFLC Client

Colin Morgan

Florence Food Share

Rico Perez

The Arc of Lane County

Clinton Sandvick

Sandstetter Media

Phyllis Swenson

Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/25/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/29/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.