Midwives on Missions of Service

Women making a difference

aka MOMS   |   Gualala, CA   |  www.MOMS-Midwives.org

Mission

MOMS is a non-profit organization whose purpose is to improve maternal health through education and service. How we fulfill our mission: Prepare women to educate and support their communities, especially the pregnant women Train women in the skills and knowledge they need to support local women in normal birth Promote effective maternity care to all women Our philosophy of mission: We serve marginalized women. We improve and save women's and children's lives by preparing women chosen by the community to provide excellent maternity care. A Leadership Council and local Trainers ensure we stay on track and provide sensitive and sensible training.

Ruling year info

2001

President of the Board

M. Christie McManus

Main address

P.O. Box 1656

Gualala, CA 95445 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

93-1254632

NTEE code info

Reproductive Health Care Facilities and Allied Services (E40)

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

Family Planning Centers (E42)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Pregnant women in Sierra Leone endure some of the world's worst maternal mortality rates. The data are not sure but numbers range from about 1.5% to 3%. Neonatal mortality rates are similarly horrifying. Colonialism, racism, and sexism created a system where women are routinely denigrated and abused. Toxic charity has abounded, with programs ranging from inappropriate to overtly harmful. Sierra Leone's history of colonial mismanagement, war, disaster, and epidemics led to a nation with little infrastructure, poor education, and weak social systems. All this harms the most vulnerable in a society: the women and children.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Health Workers

Train at least two groups of 30 women each year to work as change agents and maternal health care providers.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Women and girls

Preparing local women to conduct the complete MOMS Community Health Worker program.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Women and girls

Preparing in-country managers, trainers, and leaders to conduct all MOMS' business

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Women Making a Difference 2009

Soroptimist of El Cerrito

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students demonstrating responsible behaviors and work habits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

COVID reduced the ability to conduct classes.

Number of students receiving personal instruction and feedback about their performance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students at or above a 90% attendance rate

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of members from priority population attending training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of external speaking requests for members of the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

MOMS mission is to reduce maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity among women with the fewest choices, through education and service.

By building respectful partnerships and providing education, MOMS empowers local people to take action that will make a difference. MOMS trains and certifies local, trusted women to be Community Health Workers. After each class organizes itself and creates a business plan, MOMS provides a small grant for the class to start a business, which allows them to function independently and improve the local economy.

To ensure local control and development of staff, MOMS also trains and certifies qualified care providers to conduct the health worker training sessions at the highest standard of quality and consistency. MOMS set up an executive team to provide leadership. And MOMS created a Leadership Council drawing a member from every class we teach.

Much suffering can be reduced by providing well-trained, local, trusted health workers. We prepare health workers to do the following:
1. Connect the community with the local clinic;
2. Teach community members about good health;
3. Provide evidence-based maternity care under the auspices of the local clinics; and
4. Act as change agents to solve problems in the community.

To avoid perpetuating colonialism, MOMS ensures that local people lead the organization. Our Country Director, Training Manager, and Trainers are local people, well-known in their communities. They gained significant local education and we supplemented that with international college programs and specialized teaching. Our Leadership Council includes one representative from each class of health workers we teach.

A small international team of skillful teachers and clinicians has returned repeatedly to build respectful partnerships with local people and their community leaders. MOMS model is strictly development, ensuring that the people build resilience and capacity, and their communities gain independence.

MOMS international leaders have deep and broad background in education, training, business, and midwifery. They have been successful executives in their fields and are known for being practitioners at the highest standards. Professional instructional designers prepare the educational material, with input from subject matter experts. All instructors have proven skill in teaching and receive additional preparation for teaching in Sierra Leone.

MOMS has worked slowly in Sierra Leone, to ensure each step is the right one and to consolidate the gains made before widening our scope. We have stayed focused on our core task: Educating rural women to improve their communities and provide outstanding maternity care.

Thus we avoid becoming part of a supply chain or educating children or digging wells. Supplies, schools, and water are real needs. MOMS, however, has neither the skill nor bandwidth to do those things.

We have certified 703 women as Community Health Workers. This certificate is approved by the Government of Sierra Leone.
We have certified three women as MOMS CHW Trainers. This was a three-year program in teaching, management, and midwifery.
We have created a Leadership Council including 19women.
We have educated and trained a Country Director and a Training Manager, who work independently.

Maternal mortality in regions where we have taught have dropped from about 5% to less than 1%.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Traditional birth attendants in Sierra Leone and their communities.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Leadership Council of elected members,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Midwives on Missions of Service

Board of directors
as of 11/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

M. Christie McManus

No Affiliation

M. Christie McManus

No Affiliation

Patricia Ross

No Affiliation

Nina Kisch

John Ferrante

Joanne Frazer

Anna Franceschi

Seth Longacre

Andrew Fagan

Stephanie Sibert

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.