SCRAP Creative Reuse

What will you make of it?

aka SCRAP USA   |   PORTLAND, OR   |  scrapcreativereuse.org

Mission

SCRAP Creative Reuse's mission is to inspire creative reuse and environmentally sustainable behavior by providing educational programs and affordable materials to the community.

Ruling year info

1999

Board Chair

Tibora Girczyc-Blum

Operations Director

Kimberly Maruska

Main address

1736 SW ALDER ST

PORTLAND, OR 97205-1812 USA

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Formerly known as

SCRAP School and Community Reuse Action Project

EIN

93-1270807

NTEE code info

Environmental Quality, Protection, and Beautification N.E.C. (C99)

Other Art, Culture, Humanities Organizations/Services N.E.C. (A99)

Education N.E.C. (B99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Reuse and Recovery

SCRAP operates creative reuse centers in
several locations that focus on diverting useable
materials from the waste stream. Our brick and mortar locations are in Portland Oregon, Baltimore Maryland, Richmond Virginia, and Ann Arbor Michigan.

The Creative Reuse Center thrives through SCRAP's activities and programs: the store, art exhibits, tours, and meetings of board, staff and committees who harness the vision and guide it to forms and forums that serve all of our stakeholders. Community members and local businesses donate clean, reusable materials to SCRAP keeping them out of the waste stream and giving them new opportunities to be used by teachers, students, engineers, designers, and the public at large. SCRAP generates income by selling these materials at an affordable cost.

Population(s) Served

The education program serves to teach environmental awareness and resourcefulness and to spark individual creativity. SCRAP strives to offer a variety of activities to our diverse community. Education program activities often include field trips at the Creative Reuse Center and end with activities that all focus on creative reuse education.

We offer SCRAP at School during which our educators meet teachers and students in the classroom and supplement their lessons with reuse education and creative reuse projects; we offer Scouting Outings for Girl Scouts of America* troops, and host birthday parties. We visit schools and conferences to educate teachers about incorporating creative reuse into their lessons and classroom. We offer Camp SCRAP in many locations, which are all day events at SCRAP range from 1-5 days long where students learn creative reuse education. Our education programs go beyond the classroom, as reuse is embedded into everything we do.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

The volunteer program enables SCRAP to meet the mission of the organization in all of its programs by recruiting, training and developing volunteers and assigning them to roles that match their experience and talents with SCRAP’s needs. The majority of our regular volunteers commit to store shifts. Other volunteer opportunities include: special events, community engagement, education and administrative support. We have an all-volunteer National Board of Directors.

Population(s) Served

SCRAP’s business engagement program, Fill Minds Not Landfills, helps businesses engage in environmentally sustainable behavior while supporting creative reuse in their community. SCRAP provides a pick-up service to collect donations of a variety of waste materials that will be reborn as inspiring supplies for teachers, artists and anyone in the community who is creatively inclined.

Although it is currently only offered at SCRAP PDX. All sites engage their business communities in taking donations and doing outreach.

Population(s) Served

SCRAP Creative Reuse Alliance and Consulting is an administrative service hub and advisory program from the SCRAP Creative Reuse Administrative Team and Board of Directors. The CRA encourages the development of Creative Reuse Centers, programs, and projects in communities beyond the current SCRAP Creative Reuse Network. SCRAP CRA Consulting provides webinars, consultations, technical services, administrative support, and community networking in order to promote the exchange of ideas and best practices centered around creative reuse.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

100 Best Green Companies to Work For In Oregon 2013

Oregon Business Magazine

Repeat Recipient of $65,000 Services Award 2010

CMD Agency

Recipicent of $65,000 Services Award 2009

CMD Agency

BEST (Businesses for Environmentally Sustainable Tomorrow) Award 2006

Portland Office of Sustainable Development

Educator of the Year 2003

Association of Environmental Recyclers

Light a Fire Award 2004

Portland Monthly Magazine

Recycling Award 2018

Keep Virginia Beautiful

Affiliations & memberships

The Nonprofit Association of Oregon 2016

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Academics

Related Program

Education Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020 in Jan - Feb we served 1587, then after the Pandemic hit from Mar - Dec we served 51.

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Volunteer Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Reuse and Recovery

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2020 we closed 2 of our sites due to the Pandemic.

Total weight of materials recycled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Reuse and Recovery

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, At-risk youth, Academics, Artists and performers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These metrics are derived from Individual Donors, Register Round up Donations, and through our End of Year Fundraising Campaign.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, At-risk youth, Academics, Artists and performers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We seek to help creative reuse thrive in every home, classroom, and community. Our Core Programs include our reuse and recovery programs, education programs, and volunteer programs at our network of creative reuse centers. We aim to improve and perfect our operations model by investing our resources in the four sites that make up our network. Our primary goals are stability and longevity for our sites and the organizational network. Our non-Core and supplementary programs include our business donation programs, administrative and consulting services, and virtual creative reuse offerings. Our full-service administrative hub supports our network of creative reuse centers while connecting with other national and international creative reuse projects and organizations to connect and build sustainable extended networks.

• Continue development of efficient and consistent standardized systems.
• Expand our administrative and financial systems to consistently and effectively support existing sites.
• Fund an enhanced staff to provide strength, sustainability and greater support to all existing sites of SCRAP Creative Reuse.
• Raise sufficient capital to allow the SCRAP Creative Reuse infrastructure to operate without compromising individual SCRAP operations.

Staffing and Management: We have a tremendously talented staff, committed board members and an army of passionate and dedicated volunteers. We have systems in place for checks and balances, responsible and sustainable management, and strong financial oversight. We are visionary with our feet firmly planted in reality. We are systematic decisions-makers accessing expert resources nationally.

Governance and Advisors: SCRAP Creative Reuse is governed by a national Board of Directors and each local SCRAP site also has an Advisory board to provide local guidance and strategy support. Further, the Board of Directors is reassessing our strategic plan to serve as an overall roadmap for the management and continuation of SCRAP Creative Reuse.

We have successfully developed a network of 4 sites around the US served by the administrative hub. We are using a proprietary tool kit, training program, mentoring and peer support, financial support systems, policies and procedures for site development. As noted, our accomplishments include:

1. We have launched programs in four states.

2. In fiscal year 2019, we diverted 426,966 pounds of usable creative materials that would typically have become part of the waste stream. We make the materials – and reuse education - available, at a low cost, to entire communities including educators, artisans, crafters, creative entrepreneurs and families.

3. In fiscal year 2019, we served 15,896 young people through our education program and raised community awareness of creative reuse through events, fundraisers, and community outreach.

4. In fiscal year 2019, volunteers donated 17,867 hours of their time.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The Creative Reuse Centers in each community are locally managed and operated, with core staff managing materials coming from the community and making them available back to the local community, educators, creatives, and organizations. We serve Adults, Teenagers, Children, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Academics, and multiple local nonprofit organizations, by providing volunteer opportunities, educational programing and low cost materials. In addition, community members and local businesses donate clean, reusable materials to SCRAP keeping them out of the waste stream and giving them new life as media in creative projects.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Suggestion box/email, One on one conversations,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our organization has been building webinars to help people learn how to open up Creative Reuse Centers in their communities. Our surveys let us know that the information seemed redundant to what we had on our websites and cost prohibitive for some people. These surveys also let us know what types of information people where looking for. We have since created a new Webinar (with more on the way) to reflect these requests and restructured our pricing.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

SCRAP Creative Reuse
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

SCRAP Creative Reuse

Board of directors
as of 1/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tibora Girczyc-Blum

Karen Rivenburg

Retired, Corporate Finance

Melissa Morris

Senior Project Manager

Sharon Robinson

Artist

Tibora Girczyc-Blum

Cypress Grove, Event Manager

Shifrah Nenner

Retired, Software Engineer

Alison Backus

Digital marketing and online sales

Rachel Kassman

Grant writing

Tai Calandriello

Operations, Marketing and Communication

Rhiannon Orizaga

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/20/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Eastern European/Jewish
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/26/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.