Fred Finch Youth & Family Services

aka Fred Finch   |   Oakland, CA   |  http://www.fredfinch.org

Mission

The mission of Fred Finch is to provide innovative, effective services supporting children, youth, young adults, and families to heal from trauma and lead healthier, productive lives.

Ruling year info

1971

Principal Officer

Tom Alexander LCSW

Main address

3800 Coolidge Ave

Oakland, CA 94602 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Fred Finch Children's Home

EIN

94-0474080

NTEE code info

Community Mental Health Center (F32)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the US Department of Health and Human services, about 422,000 children currently living in California suffer from a serious mental health condition.

Additionally, the Public Policy Institute of California estimates that, in 2007, child poverty rates among Latinos was 23.6% and 28.5% among African Americans. There are currently over 56,000 California children in the foster care system, and, between 2009 and 2011, infants entered foster care at a rate three times that of any other age group. While we serve children from all over California, during 2011 alone, and in just the six counties in which we have service facilities, there were nearly 10,000 reported and substantiated cases of child abuse and neglect.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Based Services

Fred Finch provides an array of services tailored to the needs of individuals served and their families. Services are strength-based, culturally competent, family-centered, and aimed at supporting the individual in their home and community.
 
All services are specifically designed to assist individuals who are facing complex challenges. Each has a mental or emotional impairment. Many have experienced trauma and abuse, some at a very young age. The majority are from families who live in poverty. Many have experienced exclusion, discrimination and stigma.

 The following services are available to youth, teens, young adults, and their families:

In-home Services: Services provide support, psycho-education and treatment for biological or foster families who want to provide a home for their youth but frequently fear they lack what is needed to address a crisis when it erupts. Within a brief duration, the family and youth develop effective responses to crisis and other skills. The goal is to avoid the need for psychiatric hospitalization.

 Therapeutic Behavioral Services (TBS): These are intensive services designed to help youth achieve the stability needed to continue in their living situation and remain safe in the community. These time-limited, individualized, one-to-one behavioral interventions are adjunctive to, and in collaboration with, a long term treatment provider.

 Visiting Therapist:: Services include a full range of clinical interventions to assist youth for whom there are barriers to receiving office-based therapy. Some of the typical barriers are lack of transportation, disruption of previous treatment efforts, and significant resistance to formal therapy settings.

Wraparound Services: This emerging practice provides alternative treatment to children and youth and their families who are wards or dependents of the court. This is an alternative to a residential treatment program. Treatment is strength-based, needs-driven, and family centered. Children and youth are supported with comprehensive mental health and social services to live with or as close to their family and home as is safely possible. Services are available around the clock and provided with a commitment to success. Families and youth participate as full partners in the design of service plans to meet their personal unique goals.

Population(s) Served
Families
At-risk youth

In 1998, Fred Finch created one of the nation’s first comprehensive specialized residential treatment programs in Oakland, California. This new treatment model uniquely grouped services together for youth who are both emotionally disturbed and have a developmental disability. Prior to this strategy, there were really no effective services for individuals facing both of these challenges. The success of this integrated and innovative residential treatment approach led to successful replication of this program in San Diego, California.

In addition to an emotional disturbance and developmental disability, individuals served in these programs have usually suffered some form of discrimination, stigma or exclusion in community, social and school settings. Some have mental health impairments resulting from abuse or neglect. Some have available parents or families, others do not. Some have had trouble with the law. All need safety, security, 24 hour support, a specialized school program and mental health services. With these they can learn to recognize their strengths and assets, demonstrate their skills and develop positive relationships. They can also learn to cope with the stresses of life, develop independent living skills and plan for a positive future.
 
Our residential treatment services provide around the clock care and supervision, mental health services, behavioral management, psychiatric services, pre-vocational, vocational and academic services to youth who cannot, at this time, live in a family home. A multi-disciplinary team provides individualized, strength-based services that are culturally sensitive and focus on strengths of the family and individual with a goal of long term successful return back to their home or to independent community living. 

Due to our successful outcomes with the residential treatment model for the developmentally delayed, a new type of service was added specifically for youth who are developmentally delayed and need short term crisis intervention and respite services in an out-of-home setting. These services are brief, aimed at stabilizing the youth and working closely with the family for successful reentry into the living situation.

Congruent with superior quality and adherence to best practice standards, all residential services are licensed by the California Department of Social Services; certified by the county Medi-Cal program and the California Department of Education; and accredited by the Joint Commission.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Success in the school environment is one of the strongest predictors of future success in a young person’s life. Fred Finch (FF) has seized the opportunity to provide services within public school systems to assure young people success in the educational setting. With long term expertise in the provision of mental health services in
academic settings FF offers services in the public school systems designed to help young people with behavioral problems succeed academically while providing
individualized treatment during the day.

 These services are effective in decreasing
disruptive behaviors, increasing attendance, improving focus, developing and maintaining successful relationships, and increasing overall academic performance. 
 
Without our school services many youth would drop out of school. Our school services provide persistent support to youth to motivate them to stay in school. Strategies to handle the pervasive gang, drug, and violent situations that plague the public school system result in positive long term outcomes.

Services are specifically designed to assist individuals who are facing complex challenges. All have a mental or emotional impairment. Many have experienced trauma and abuse, some at a very young age. The majority are from families who live in poverty. Many have experienced exclusion, discrimination and stigma.

We offer services in classrooms and offices at the school site, bringing services to the youth where they are. This treatment
model relies on effective collaboration with the student, school staff and family members. Together with Fred Finch, this support system facilitates consistency in treatment that is individualized, strength-based, culturally sensitive,
family centered and effective.

Pre-vocational and vocational education is offered as an adjunct to school services, affording students the opportunity to learn job skills, practice resume writing and mock interviewing, and successfully obtain jobs in the community or through Fred Finch.

Services are located at an array of schools throughout Alameda and Contra Costa counties, and serve individuals in elementary, middle, and high schools, both in special and regular education.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Providing an array of services including affordable housing integrated with mental health, career development, educational support, and independent living skills practice our Transition Age Youth services serve young people ages 16-24 with significant histories of childhood maltreatment.  Participants often experience multiple challenges including homelessness, compromised health and mental health, and poverty. Many have limited family resources, co-occurring substance use challenges, and have not completed high school as a result of frequent disruptions experienced as children.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

A true innovator in the development of Housing Programshousing opportunities for youth with emotional disturbance, Fred Finch (FF) continues its leadership in the field with the development of Rising Oaks, which provides a new lease on life for 30 foster youth aging out of the child welfare system. Additionally, FF provides transitional housing for homeless youth as well as permanent housing for young adults with serious mental illness. These housing opportunities provide youth and young adults the chance to reside in a safe and secure environment while developing the necessary skills to live independently.

Coolidge Court: An 18-unit, permanent, supportive housing program designed to assist transitioning young adults 18-24 obtain and maintain independent, permanent housing. The complex consists of individual studio apartments in a small housing complex comprised of four buildings, adjacent but separate from the Fred Finch campus. The setting is very suburban, on a quiet street in Oakland, CA.

Tenants pay 30% of their gross income towards rent. Any services tenants receive are voluntary. Nearly 40% of Coolidge Court tenants are enrolled in college with a vast majority of tenants working part-time (25 to 30 hours per week), in school part-time, or a combination of the two activities at any given time. Most jobs tend to be in mailroom settings or offices, or doing baking or massage–employment areas with which the vocational rehabilitation department has significant experience. Of those participants in school, many are studying computer-related topics, the trades, or are in film school. There are 1 to 2 move-outs per year, with tenants having an average length of stay of 4 to 5 years.

Rising Oaks: Rising Oaks is a transitional housing program for young adults who have either emancipated from the foster care system or are participating in extended foster care. Along with 30 studio apartments set in a safe and welcoming community, Rising Oaks provides a comprehensive continuum of developmentally appropriate, culturally competent, co-located and integrated services in collaboration with Alameda County Social Services Agency. Services include case management, life skills training, health and wellness services, educational support, career development, individual and family therapy, support groups, housing and transportation assistance, and access to community resources. Rising Oaks works in partnership with youth to identify and build upon their strengths and to lay the foundation from which they can launch successfully into their adult lives.

Turning Point: Located in Berkeley, California, Turning Point is a temporary, transitional housing program designed to assist homeless youth age 18-25 to obtain and maintain independent permanent housing. Participants reside in the program housing temporarily, depending on their needs, with the goal of moving as soon as possible to permanent housing. Fred Finch staff customizes a menu of services to help residents address individual goals. Services that residents can access include: crisis intervention, therapy and counseling; mental health and substance abuse assessment, treatment, and referral; educational, vocational, and employment assessment, support, training, placement referral and advocacy; financial literacy and independent living skills training; housing search; health education and case management. Turning Point provides services to up to 12 youth at any given time.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Mean changes in ANSA/CANS scores from admission to discharge

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of participants who improved in at least one domain.

Number of clients who report adequate culturally appropriate services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Reflects number of reporting participants who felt their services were culturally appropriate.

Number of clients who report general satisfaction with their services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of responding participants who felt their services were effective

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At Fred Finch Youth Center, we are committed to the notion that no one is without hope, no matter how desperate their circumstances may appear. We offer hope, provide relief, and develop a pathway to a new and brighter future.

FFYC uses outcomes data, predictive analytics and research on the social determinants of health and mental health to build consumer profiles. With these profiles, FFYC identifies families, youth and young adults who can benefit from interventions that prevent escalation in the intensity and duration of treatment, thus preventing additional suffering, increased costs of treatment and positive outcomes for each participant.

Fred Finch Youth Center (FFYC) creates value for behavioral health care consumers and funders by providing comprehensive clinical services proven to deliver positive outcomes. Using clinical, demographic and outcomes data, FFYC can reliably predict utilization of services and designs customized, cost effective early interventions, ultimately reducing the cost of care typically associated with complex, high-need consumers of behavioral health care.

We will capitalize on FFYC's longstanding history of dedication to and innovation with vulnerable populations who experience complex needs in multiple life domains (e.g., mental health, physical health, housing, education, employment). Insuring our clinical services are intensive, coordinated, comprehensive, and measurable, we deliver positive outcomes supported by quantified reports. Using this data, FFYC seeks new markets where funders value comprehensive services and where safety net services are available and accessible.
To develop an understanding of both who accesses and who benefits from our services, we will continue developing our capacity to capture, aggregate, synthesize, and analyze our own outcome data as well as data generated by other sources. FFYC will expand our CQI and data analytics teams with both staffing and technological resources to create a “Business Intelligence" team dedicated to improving our capacity to collect, aggregate, and synthesize the data we collect.

Identifying our strategic objectives was a collaborative effort involving staff from every position type; direct care, support services, union members, managers, and senior leadership. Data was collected through a variety of sources; annual surveys, one-on-one discussions, focus groups, CQI committees data and observations. Staff feedback is helping to refine and better shape how we achieve our objectives. The Strategic Plan and Balanced scorecard approach to achieving goals have been incorporated into all new hire trainings and review trainings for current staff.

We are revitalizing our organizational structure to capitalize on our clinical expertise, aligning our clinical services with our values and core treatment model. The new structure allows us to expand our assessment of the value of our services and to scale the services that demonstrate value to payers and participants. Reorganized administrative functions relieve program management personnel of daily administrative tasks, enabling managers to drive the implementation of comprehensive and integrated services.
The Business Intelligence team captures and analyzes publically available and ethically acceptable participant data. We analyze this data and use the results to develop our ability to predict which participants may become super utilizers of publicly funded safety net services.

Next we will invest in the hardware, software, and personnel to overlay this data with that from non-traditional partners, like mobile phone companies, credit card companies, social media firms, the census, and other government data, to develop a dataset that is as comprehensive as the services we provide and add further detail to our profile of the super utilizer. With the guidance of this data, we drive program and treatment innovation to services that demonstrate the ability to prevent escalation in service utilization (e.g., hospitalization, incarceration, emergency room use, multi-public system involvement). We will develop our capacity to capture and communicate both the financial and humanitarian value to funders and the broader community.

Financials

Fred Finch Youth & Family Services
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Fred Finch Youth & Family Services

Board of directors
as of 4/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Elisabeth Jewel

Aroner, Jewel & Ellis Partners

Richard Walter

Community Volunteer

Minerva Carcaño

Northern California and Nevada United Methodist Conference

David McGrew

CFO San Mateo Medical Center

Elisabeth Jewel

Aroner, Jewel & Ellis Partners

Brad Johnson

Developer DigiSight

Matt Williams

Investment Advisor

Bruce Soublet

Assistant City Attorney/ADA Coordinator City of Richmond, CA

Brent Taylor

Counseling & School Psychology Department Chair San Diego State University

April Smith

Deputy District Attorney Alameda County

Tosan Boyo

COO Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital

Burt Yin

Community Volunteer

Greg Kershaw

Manager, Digital Marketing WD-40

Nitin Karandikar

Vice President, Engineering DigiSight

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/14/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data