Peninsula Family Service

Opening Doors, Changing Lives

San Mateo, CA   |  http://peninsulafamilyservice.org

Mission

Peninsula Family Service strengthens the community by providing children, families, and older adults the support and tools to realize their full potential and lead healthy, stable lives.

We envision a community where opportunity, financial stability and wellness are secured for all.

Each year, we assist 12,000 of our region's most vulnerable children, families, and older adults. We employ about 150 people working throughout a four-county radius; San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and San Benito counties. We bring early learning to the zip codes that need it most, help families build a bridge over the safety net, and ensure that older adults live well.

Our three primary programs are Early Learning, Financial Empowerment, and Older Adult Services.

Ruling year info

1950

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Heather Cleary

Main address

24 Second Ave

San Mateo, CA 94401 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Family Service Agency of San Mateo County, Inc

EIN

94-1186169

NTEE code info

Family Services (P40)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Senior Centers/Services (P81)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Peninsula Family Service works to help vulnerable families better their lives. We strengthen the community by providing children, families, and older adults the support and tools to realize their full potential and lead healthy, stable lives. We envision a community where opportunity, financial stability and wellness are secured for all. Each year, we assist 12,000 of our region's most vulnerable children, families, and older adults. We employ about 150 people working throughout a four-county radius; San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and San Benito counties. We bring early learning to the zip codes that need it most, help families build a bridge over the safety net, and ensure that older adults live well. Our three primary programs are Early Learning, Financial Empowerment, and Older Adult Services.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Early Learning

We open doors to learning, health, and stability for children (prenatal to twelve years old).

We change lives by providing high-quality, innovative child care, and helping parents nurture their children’s development during the critical first five years.

We provide:
Early Learning Program – Our child development centers provide children (ages 0-5) from low-income families including those who are homeless, with a safe, nurturing environment where they can learn, socialize, and thrive. We offer nutritious meals, high-quality curriculum, and targeted therapeutic interventions for children who have experienced trauma. We also support their development at home by educating parents on the latest early childhood development techniques.

Home-Based Program – We visit families with young children (prenatal to age 3) to provide education, strategies and support for early child development.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Economically disadvantaged people

We open doors to financial education, services, and tools.

We change lives by empowering individuals to take control of their financial futures.

We provide:

Financial and career education – Financial workshops educate participants on budgeting, spending habits, and credit building. All participants must successfully complete these workshops before receiving additional support or tools.

Employment services for older adults – The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) provides training opportunities and paid internships for adults ages 55+ to re-enter the workforce.

Affordable loans – After completing financial education, we provide people with the tools to rebuild their financial futures. This includes offering low interest loan options, such as the DriveForward Vehicle Loan Program which enables the purchase of a quality used vehicle.

Banking alternatives – Individuals who do not have access to traditional banking services can access tools to rebuild their credit, such as low-cost prepaid VISA Debit cards and zero-interest social loans (lending circles).

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Getting older may be inevitable, at Peninsula Family Service we believe togetherness is the key to living well at any age. Our Older Adult Services program helps people stay connected to their community, their neighbors, and their passion for life.

We offer a wide array of services that break down the barriers to our vision of opportunity, financial stability, and wellness for everyone, at every age. Our programs include the Fair Oaks Adult Activity Center, Senior Peer Counseling, Sequoia Community Care Program, Peninsula Circle of Care, and other tools our neighbors need to navigate their advancing years with ease.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Alliance for Children and Families - Member

National Council on Aging

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The 2018-2022 Strategic Plan is designed around achieving four goals:

1. Deliver high quality programs aligned with community needs.
2. Achieve long-term financial security.
3. Be a recognized leader in the nonprofit community.
4. Foster a healthy, positive, working environment.

Develop an integrated participant information system. Build additional partnerships. Expand program assessment tools. Involve program participants in program evaluation and design. Create quality improvement initiatives. Build a comprehensive and sophisticated development program. Transition from grantee to partnership funding relationships. Increase number of programs that are both high mission impact and financially sustainable along dual bottom line. Reduce facility costs. Successfully compete for program funding opportunities. Engage in and lead policy discussions. Develop marketing strategies. Enhance governing board. Build competitive compensation and benefit packages. Create professional development opportunities. Establish a meaningful employee recognition program. Integrate organizational values throughout organization. Improve internal communications. Periodically survey workforce.

Peninsula Family Service is celebrating its 70th year of helping vulnerable families better their lives. We are staffed by 150 dedicated professionals who are highly respected for delivering effective services.

We are the service agency of choice for many state, federal, and local programs. We steadily increase our community partnerships to form a collective impact on reducing poverty in our communities . Our governing board, advisory council, and program advisory committees ensure that our services are successful, meaningful, and reaching the people who need them most.

Our strategic roadmap takes us from FY18 through FY22. The roadmap outlines goals, objectives, next steps, staffing resources, measurable outcomes and target completion dates. Copies of the roadmap can be found on our website at www.peninsulafamilyservice.org.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Examples of recent changes include: At the organization level, after the two-year pilot of the Financial Empowerment Program’s Listen for Good initiative, there was a recommendation to expand the feedback process to all programs. This process is being introduced into all but one of our programs. At the program level, workshop materials for our financial empowerment program are now available online, allowing participants to attend virtually. This is part of an effort to resolve scheduling and parking issues raised by participants. Feedback from participants across all of our programs point out that PFS needs to do more to get the word out about our services. We are exploring the possibility to hire an Outreach Coordinator that would lead efforts to meet these marketing and outreach needs

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Peninsula Family Service
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Peninsula Family Service

Board of directors
as of 3/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jeff Adams

Arbor Capital Management

Term: 2020 - 2022

Jeff Adams

Arbor Capital Management

Shelia Canzian

Parks & Rec for the city of San Mateo

Perla Garcia

Vocational Nurse

Sharon Hartley

Kaiser Permanente

Linda Jansen

Lending Club

Elizabeth Jenson

Community Volunteer

Lisa Kearns

Marriage & Family Therapist

Euree Kim

Stanford ACT

Jay Lee

RippleWorks Foundation

David Mariani

AtScale Inc.

Anthony McCusker

Goodwin Proctor, LLP

Sarah Poulain

Family Connections

Alejandro Vilchez

AV Consulting

Megan Winters

Educator and Community Volunteer

Ron Lynch

Investment Advisor

Debbie Harrison

VP of Marketing & Business Strategy

Monique Spyka

PFM Asset Management, LLC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/27/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/27/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.