Animal related

Humane Society Silicon Valley

aka HSSV   |   Milpitas, CA   |  http://www.hssv.org

Mission

To save and enhance lives - both two-legged and four-legged.

Ruling year info

1942

President

Kurt Krukenberg

Main address

901 Ames Avenue

Milpitas, CA 95035 USA

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Formerly known as

Humane Society of Santa Clara Valley

EIN

94-1196215

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Humane Society Silicon Valley (HSSV) has been serving people and pets in Silicon Valley for over 85 years. Having facilitated more than half a million animal adoptions, HSSV is leading the charge for animal welfare through community education programs, creative marketing techniques and effective homeless animal prevention strategies. HSSV's leading-edge programs focus on adopting pets into loving homes, keeping pets with their families, treating and rehabilitating shelter animals, preventing unwanted births through low-cost and no-cost spay/neuter services and educating the next generation of animal advocates. With the support of volunteers, donors and collaborative partnerships, HSSV is committed to saving and enhancing lives to ensure every pet in Silicon Valley has a home.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Programs to Save Lives and Place Homeless Animals

Humane Society Silicon Valley adopts rescued, abandoned and surrendered companion animals into new, loving homes. Through our Regional Rescue, Behavior and Foster Programs, we collaborate with other shelters and rescue groups in Silicon Valley to save dogs and cats who are out of time, or need special medical and/or behavioral treatment to become adoptable. These animals are cared for at Humane Society Silicon Valley's Animal Community Center until they are ready for a new home. Often, animals that need a bit more time or need a quiet place to recover will stay in a foster home until a permanent home is found. We also have a robust Lost/Found program. We invest our efforts in extensive behavioral assistance for people who might surrender their pets if we don't intervene. Our goal in Adoptions and Placement services is to find homes for the animals we save, and to keep animals in homes, so they never see the inside of a shelter. Though the goal at Humane Society Silicon Valley is to find new, loving homes for the animals in our care, there is an enormous amount of care and investment in making sure the animals at Humane Society Silicon Valley are comfortable, well-fed, clean and medically sound while they wait for their new family. The Animal Care Team is responsible for the general care and well-being of the dogs, cats and rabbits in our care at the Animal Community Center.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$3,310,454

Community Services at Humane Society Silicon Valley consist of those services designed to accomplish the following: 1) Build community and a sense of belonging, 2) Educate youth and adults to exponentially create a kinder, gentler and compassionate future for animals and 3) Provide services that enable the community to bond with their pets so we can end the cycle of surrender and abandonment. The areas that fall under this category are: Volunteers regularly give of their time to Humane Society Silicon Valley's programs and animals. Without these volunteers, we simply could not do the work that we do! Volunteers perform critical support functions in every area of our organization and Humane Society Silicon Valley volunteers save the organization over $1,500,000 per year. Humane Society Silicon Valley provides eight Humane Education programs designed for every age child - from pre-kindergarten through high school. More than 9,000 students are impacted through the Education Programs, reaching exponentially thousands more through their friends and families. Education programs are critical to Humane Society Silicon Valley's mission because we are helping to shape the values of the students we reach - which ultimately affects the future of companion animals in Silicon Valley and beyond. Humane Society Silicon Valley has a medical center that, in addition to caring for our shelter animals, provides services for the public. We perform low-cost spay/neuter surgeries, and provide vaccines and microchip services. The medical center also provides TNR (Trap, Neuter and Return) services for homeless and feral cats.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
At-risk youth
Budget
$1,510,377

Humane Society Silicon Valley has a medical center that, in addition to caring for our shelter animals, provides services for the public. We perform low-cost spay/neuter surgeries, and provide vaccines and microchip services. The medical center also provides TNR (Trap, Neuter and Return) services for homeless and feral cats.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Budget
$2,760,153

Mutual Rescue™ is a national initiative created by Humane Society Silicon Valley to change the conversation around animal welfare from “people OR animals” to “people AND animals.” People all across the country have stories to tell about how shelter animals have changed their lives for the better and Mutual Rescue™ is bringing these stories to the world stage. The first film, “Eric & Peety,” was instantly a viral Internet sensation and has been viewed more than 90 million times across the globe. Mutual Rescue™ believes that helping animals helps people. And yet, of the $373 billion in charitable donations made in the U.S. in 2015, less than 1% went to animal-related causes. The intiative wants to raise awareness that when people donate to a local animal shelter, they are helping to transform the lives of people in their community for the better through life-changing, human-animal relationships. A recent survey revealed that 71% of Americans believe their local humane society is a branch of The Humane Society of the United States. This is not the case, and one of the goals of Mutual Rescue™ is to help people understand the importance of giving directly to their local shelters to create the biggest impact in their local communities. Mutual Rescue™ emphasizes bringing local communities together to support both animals and humans. This ultimately means connecting millions of animals with millions of people to create the positive transformation of communities all across the country.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$331,396

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2017

Charity Navigator 2017

Awards

Gold Certification 2010

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council

2009 California Integrated Waste Reduction Award 2009

California Integrated Waste Management Board

2009 City of Milpitas Beautification Award 2009

City of Milpitas Neighborhood Beautification Tenth Annual Recognition Award Program

2009 Certificate of Recognition in the Greening of Milpitas 2009

City of Milpitas

Bay Area Green Business Standards 2008

2008 Green Business Certification from Santa Clara County

First Ever Model Shelter 2017

Association of Shelter Veterinarians

Affiliations & memberships

First Model Shelter awarded by Association of Shelter Veterinarians 2017

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Programs to Save Lives and Place Homeless Animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Humane Society Silicon Valley finds homes for thousands of dogs, cats, rabbits, and pocket pets each year.

Total Animals Saved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Programs to Save Lives and Place Homeless Animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total animals saved includes adoptions, return to owner, transfer to other shelters or rescues as well as pet retention programs.

Number of Children Participants in education programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

K-12 (5-19 years)

Related Program

Community Programs for People and Animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Includes programs specific to under-resourced communities as well as summer camp.

Animal Save Rate (as a %)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Programs to Save Lives and Place Homeless Animals

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Save Rate is calculated as follows: Live Outcomes divided by Total Outcomes excluding owner/guardian requested euthanasia (unhealthy and untreatable).

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Programs to Save Lives and Place Homeless Animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We offer innovative, accessible, and targeted spay/neuter services that ultimately reduce the number of animals coming into community shelters. The ongoing success of these programs provides the found

Pet Pantry Distribution (lbs of dry food + cans of wet food)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Programs for People and Animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Some pet owners going through economic hardship are faced with surrendering their animals. We provide pet food at no charge to keep these families together.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Our Organization has three main goals:<br/>To connect thousands of animals with thousands of loving families to enrich the community.<br/>To set a national example for what a shelter can and should be.<br/>To save as many animal lives as possible in Silicon Valley.

Our approach to saving and enriching lives comes to five strategic approaches: preventing unwanted births, treating and rehabilitating homeless animals, finding homes for animals, keeping animals in homes, and educating people on the care and treatment of animals.

To Prevent Unwanted Births, we have spay/neuter programs that include low-cost access for the general public and targeted programs to reduce areas driving the greatest number of animals into shelters (e.g. trap/neuter/return (TNR) for cats and free surgeries for animals residing in specific zip codes).<br/><br/>To Treat and Rehabilitate Homeless Animals, we provide medical and behavioral care for shelter animals administered by highly trained shelter medicine specialists and maintain partnerships with private veterinary practices and veterinary schools to call on additional resources as needed. <br/><br/>To Find Homes For Animals, we operate adoption centers in 4 locations: our Animal Community Center in Milpitas, and three Neighborhood Adoption Centers co-located in Petco and Petsmart stores in San Jose, Sunnyvale and Mountain View.<br/><br/>To Keep Pets in Homes, we provide owner counseling, training programs, and pet pantry services for families in need.<br/><br/>To Educate, we have youth programs for all ages ranging from elementary school through high school including summer camp, compassion in action classes, and youth advisory board.

We measure our progress in terms of the percentage and number of lives saved within our own organization and as a community as a whole. We also track the total number of animals coming into area shelters to ensure that the homeless animal population is not growing beyond sheltering capacity.

Humane Society Silicon Valley serves as a safety net for companion animals in Silicon Valley, sets a national example for innovation, and seeks to transform human lives through deeper connections to animals. The impact achieved reflects the quality of the Organization and its people.<br/>The Organization is driving significant, positive change for both companion animals and the people who care for and about them. The solutions are achieving groundbreaking results. <br/>Specifically, the Organization:<br/>• Saves 100% of all healthy animals in the Organization's care and has done so since 2006. In the year ended June 30, 2017, the Organization saved 93% of all animals that came through its doors, including many needing rehabilitation or extended treatment. This compares to the national average of 70% (for 2012, as reported on http://www.maddiesfund.org/). Even more importantly, these results are being achieved while the overall community save rate continues to improve.<br/>• Provides rehabilitation and medical or behavioral treatment for over 4,000 (in fiscal year 2017) animals each year. These animals are just like pets many people already have in their homes today but they don't yet have the loving guardians they need to overcome common challenges. Given time, space, and tailored medical and behavioral attention, these animals can lead high quality lives for years to come and provide profound enrichment to their future two legged families. Currently, 74% of the animals brought in require this kind of care and treatment. <br/>• Finds and helps keep—loving homes for over 6,000 animals each year. This includes providing counseling and no cost pet food to keep over 84 pet animals in their homes (excluding managed colony cats), returning nearly 160 lost animals to their homes, transferring 620 animals, including wild life, to rescue groups and managed cat colonies, and facilitating adoptions for 5,200 animals. Currently, nearly 66% of these adopted animals will receive foster care or kitten nursery care prior to being matched with their new families. <br/>• Performs and influences nearly 7,900 spay/neuter surgeries each year. <br/>• Became the first model shelter in the world to complete the Association of Shelter Veterinarians Guidelines for Standards of Care. Confirmed by the Koret Shelter Medicine Program of the University of California at Davis, the organization achieved model shelter status by demonstrating and documenting that it meets all 543 “must, should and ideal" standards set forth by the Association of Shelter Veterinarians (ASV). The first shelter ever to earn this distinction, HSSV is leading the charge for humane treatment of animals.

Financials

Humane Society Silicon Valley
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Humane Society Silicon Valley

Board of directors
as of 9/2/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rebecca Ranninger Owen

Sally Hazard Bourgoin

SHB Associates

Debbie VanderZwaag

Driscoll’s Strawberry Associates

Peter Detkin

Intellectual Ventures

Alison Buchanon

Hoge, Fenton, Jones and Appel

Becky Ranninger Owen

Community Member

Blythe Jack

Community Member

Brenda Swiney

Community Member

Christy Richardson

William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

Andrea Borch

Community Member

Shannon Waas

Community Member

Sue Diekman

Community Member

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Keywords

Animal education, humane treatment of animals, animals, shelter, medical, vet, veterinary, spay, neuter, TNR, adoptions