Animal related

Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA

aka PHS/SPCA

Burlingame, CA

Mission

PHS/SPCA, a private non-profit organization guided by the humane ethic, builds healthy relationships between people and animals. Each year thousands of animals pass through our doors. We provide a warm bed, nutritious food, veterinary care and a gentle touch for the lost, stray, unwanted and injured domestic and wild animals in our community. We accept all animals, and often provide a second chance to the most needy animals - animals who would otherwise be turned away at smaller adoption agencies that accept only those animals deemed highly adoptable. Our record is outstanding. Since 2003, we have adopted 100% of healthy (physically and behaviorally) dogs and cats. In addition, we use resources to make well, then adopt, approximately 200 treatable animals each month.

Ruling Year

1954

President

Mr. Ken White

Main Address

1450 Rollins Road

Burlingame, CA 94010 USA

Keywords

animals, shelter, rescue, spca, spay, neuter, wildlife, dogs, cats, humane education, adopt, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, rats, mice, birds, parrots, parakeets, cockatiels, reptiles, fish, barnyard

EIN

94-1243665

 Number

5548187745

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

IRS Filing Requirement

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Spay/Neuter Services

Cruelty Investigations

Education Programs

Wildlife Rehabilitation

Adoptions

Pet Assisted Therapy

TAILS Program

Behavior and Training Classes

Pet Loss Support Group

Mobile Spay/Neuter Clinic

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of educational screenings

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Education Programs

Context notes

Number of children and adults that participated in our educational programs.

Number of trained volunteer dog-and-handler teams

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

Number of Pet Assisted Therapy Teams

Number of site visits by dog-and-handler teams.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

Pet Assisted Therapy visits in one year.

Number of dogs walked daily by our volunteers

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

Number of dog walks in one year.

Number of animals rehomed

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Adoptions

Context notes

Animals adopted, returned to owner or transferred to other adoption organizations.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

Our ultimate goal is to build healthy relationships between people and animals. We serve all the people and animals in San Mateo County, as well as wildlife in San Francisco through northern Santa Clara County. The needs our work addresses are varied, ranging from needs related to: animal rescue and control; animal cruelty investigations; lost and found companion animals; adoption of cats, dogs, small animals, barnyard animals and exotics; volunteering; pet-assisted therapy; living with local wild animals (including rehabilitation of injured and/or orphaned wild animals as well as education about nuisance issues); spaying/neutering of cats and dogs; educating children and adults about various animal topics; dog obedience training; and animal behavior consultations.

We expect outcomes to include an increased awareness about proper treatment of animals, lower number of incoming animals, higher live release rates, and overall healthier relationships between animals and the human members of our community. Our goals that strive towards these outcomes contribute to lasting and meaningful change, including decreasing incidences of cruelty towards animals, a continuing decrease in the number of unwanted animals brought to our shelter, higher live release rates, and more companion animals placed into new, loving homes.

Broadly, we strive to accomplish our long-term goals by making our services and programs available consistently, and maintaining a high degree of quality. For example, our low-cost and free spay/neuter programs have contributed greatly to improving pet overpopulation in our community; since our spay/neuter clinic opened in 1970, we have seen a decrease of over 80% in the number of incoming cats and dogs. From this example you can see that our short-term goal of providing low-cost and free spay/neuter surgeries (which also have health benefits for those animals) leads to the long-term benefit of leading to fewer unwanted pets in our community because of the decrease in unplanned litters. This allows us to spend more time and resources on the animals that are brought to us, improving their quality of life while they're here and improving their chances of being matched with a new family.

Our staff, volunteers, and supporting community are three of our greatest assets. We are fortunate to live in a community where many people care deeply about the welfare of local companion and wild animals. We have hard-working and experienced staff, including four full-time veterinarians who provide excellent treatment for the thousands of shelter animals that come through our doors each year. We also typically have approximately 1,200 active volunteers, a dedicated team that assists staff (which usually number at a little over 100 staff) in almost every department. And last, but certainly not least, we have loyal donors who support us in many valuable ways – concerned individuals and organizations who donate hard-earned funds and items, people who support our long-term stability by including us in their wills, and children who hold bake sales and other fundraisers for us. All of these factors play key roles, assisting us in accomplishing our goals and strengthening our shelter.

Qualitatively, we asses our progress toward our intended impact by the comfort we're able to provide to animals who come through our doors, both while they're here and after they leave, as well as the overall nature of the interactions between the people and animals in our community. We also measure our progress by feedback and our general impression of how happy our community is with the services and programs we provide. Positive feedback can indicate that we're on the right track, while negative feedback can help us identify areas that may need improvement, at which point we asses our methods and make adjustments as necessary.

Quantitatively, we asses our progress by the number of animals whose lives we're able to save, the number of animals we adopt into loving new homes, the number of animals we're able to help with spay/neuter surgeries (and the resulting reduction in unplanned litters), etc. One good indicator of the overall success of our spay/neuter programs, for example, is the number of animals that are brought to our shelter. While this is a very broad measurement, it does provide a good indicator of the current state of pet overpopulation (which spay/neuter surgeries help to combat) in our community. A more specific measurement is our yearly Live Release Rate, which compares the number of animals that come through our doors with the number of animals we're able to save. We break down this number further by looking at the outcomes of animals with treatable and untreatable conditions. We have an excellent track record, finding homes for 100% of our healthy adoptable cats and dogs, and treating an average of 200 additional animals per month that were not otherwise adoptable because of health and/or behavior reasons. One number that would be a red flag to ourselves is if the number of animals with treatable conditions that we were not able to save rose. This would warrant careful inspection of our practices. The wellbeing of our shelter animals is critically important to us, and we are committed to helping them as best we can.

We have made much progress in various aspects of animal welfare. An example of a recently accomplished goal is the opening of our Tom and Annette Lantos Center for Compassion. We worked diligently for years in the search for and construction of a new home for the county's homeless animals. We found an appropriate site, succeeded in the entitlement process, raised funds to build the new Center for Compassion, and finally opened our doors in September 2011. The Center houses all of our charitable programs, and has become the primary focus for adoptions throughout San Mateo County, with a real and positive impact throughout the Bay Area. Our shelter has become a destination in the community and attracts many visitors, which increases adoptions and awareness of our programs. Some of our programs that were previously behind the scenes are now front and center for all to see: our dog play park is actually within the building, and has its own giant operable skylight, water fountain, high end washable artificial turf, and a large window for allowing visitors to see how we train and socialize dogs through our Hope Program, which saves an average of 200 animals every month that would not otherwise be adoptable because of health and/or behavior problems; our Kitten Nursery, which previously took over a break room during kitten season, now has its own area with a huge glass window for visitors to see how we care for motherless kittens, saving over 100 lives every season; part of our Wildlife Care Program, through which we rehabilitate and release close to 1500 injured and/or orphaned wild animals each year, is also now on display (only the animals that aren't stressed or otherwise adversely affected by being exposed to people) – this is actually the first time in the Federal and California Departments of Fish & Wildlife's permitting history that they have allowed a rehabilitation program to have a window through which to view this important work. Our innovative shelter is one-of-a-kind, and other animal shelters nationally and even abroad have used our programs as models.

Accomplishing the relatively short-term goal of opening this shelter has provided a setting that enables us to operate our programs more effectively, and improves the progress we make towards our long-term goals. One thing we have not been able to accomplish (and which in fact may not be possible) is to eliminate pet overpopulation and animal cruelty. While this type of goal might not be realistic in a complete sense, it doesn't stop us from doing our best to combat these problems and making as much improvement as we can for the animals in our community that cannot speak up for themselves. We have many dedicated staff, volunteers, and supporters in our community, and we are committed to devoting the time and resources necessary for improving animal welfare as much as possible.

External Reviews

Photos

Financials

Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2016, 2015 and 2014
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Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Not Applicable

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Not Applicable

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Not Applicable

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Not Applicable

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable