PLATINUM2023

United Way of the Bay Area

LIVE UNITED

aka United Way Bay Area   |   San Francisco, CA   |  https://uwba.org

Mission

United Way Bay Area (UWBA) helps families struggling to meet basic needs, assists students and workers seeking employment and better careers, supports our neighbors working to achieve their financial stability goals, and advocates for housing justice for all Bay Area residents. UWBA mobilizes the Bay Area to dismantle the root causes of poverty and build equitable pathways to prosperity. Through initiatives and policy change, we provide immediate and long-term support for employment, housing, financial stability, and meeting basic needs. We partner with and mobilize local labor councils in San Francisco, San Mateo, and Contra Costa counties to connect union workers and their families with basic needs resources, legal services, and workforce training opportunities, and hardship funds.

Ruling year info

1956

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Kevin Zwick

Main address

550 Kearny Street, Suite 510

San Francisco, CA 94108 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-1312348

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

United Way Bay Area helps families struggling to meet basic needs, assists students and workers seeking employment and better careers, supports our neighbors working to achieve their financial stability goals, and advocates for housing justice for all Bay Area residents. UWBA mobilizes the Bay Area to dismantle the root causes of poverty and build equitable pathways to prosperity. Through initiatives and policy change, we provide immediate and long-term support for employment, housing, financial stability, and meeting basic needs. UWBA brings together partners from the nonprofit, business, and government sectors to address Bay Area poverty. We partner across sectors, develop solutions, capture the data we need, and use those insights to support public policy and create research-backed community initiatives. UWBA envisions an equitable Bay Area where all people have the opportunities and resources needed to thrive.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Financial Stability

Our programs address various aspects of financial stability to make sure individuals and families can thrive in their daily lives, reach their goals, and recover from a crisis quickly.

SparkPoint: providing one-stop access to a full range of services to move families towards financial prosperity. 6,039 individuals were served through SparkPoint centers, with 2,722 individuals receiving free financial coaching (among whom 77% made progress towards their financial goals).

Free Tax Help: Free, secure, high-quality tax help for low- and middle-income residents across the Bay Area. This past year we provided 32,228 tax returns resulting in $53,289,926 in total federal and state refunds back to families in the community.

Public Policy: Our public policy platform is part of our comprehensive effort to end the cycle of poverty in the Bay Area and complements our organizational efforts in philanthropy, volunteerism, and community impact.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Ethnic and racial groups

We believe that access to education and employment opportunities is necessary to ensure that individuals are successful in school and in their careers. They also need critical supports that help them to stay in school and meet their basic needs. Through our Employment and Career Opportunities programs, we work with local government, businesses, nonprofits, post-secondary institutions, and school districts to support individuals in the community to lead bright, thriving futures.

SparkPoint: providing one-stop access to a full range of services to move families towards financial prosperity. Over 4500 individuals have enrolled in training programs, internships, and educational opportunities through our SparkPoint centers.

Youth Opportunity Pathways (YOP): Engaging youth and young adults in career exploration opportunities and building future skills. Since 2012, we have connected more than 34,000 youth to work opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Students
Adolescents
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Ethnic and racial groups

Bay Area individuals and families struggle to afford and access basic needs like shelter, food and healthcare. Our Basic Needs programs, partnerships, and policy work, support people in our community to meet their basic needs.

211 Bay Area: A free, vital service that connects callers with health and human services (food, shelter, child care, legal services).

Emergency Food & Shelter Program (EFSP): Helps struggling Bay Area residents access basic needs such as food, shelter, rent/mortgage payments, and utility bill assistance.
Emergency Assistance Network: assistance for families and individuals recovering from emergency situations.

Labor Partnership: We partner with local labor councils in San Francisco, San Mateo, and Contra Costa counties to share the common goal of an equitable Bay Area.

UWBA provided 5,276,794 food distributions (equivalent to 4,408,764 pounds of food) and 151,930 shelter bed nights and provided 123,215 referrals to basic needs and community resources.

Population(s) Served
Retired people
Unemployed people
Immigrants and migrants
Victims of disaster
Emergency responders

Fighting for housing stability and affordability requires putting equity front and center. Housing Justice is a social justice issue. As we work to dismantle the root causes of poverty in the Bay Area, which disproportionately impact Black, Indigenous, and other communities of color, UWBA is deepening our focus on improving access to stable, affordable housing and homelessness prevention resources.

SparkPoint: increasing housing stability services and referrals along with continuing to deliver rent relief.

211: increasing housing information and referral services and leveraging regional data to address gaps and inform policy.

Basic Needs: Emergency Food & Shelter and the Emergency Assistance Network continuing support for basic needs, including housing.

Advocacy: Expanding our housing-related policy advocacy to increase public funding for housing, reform exclusionary land-use policies, open access to opportunity for communities of color, and center renters at risk of displacement.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

Free Tax Help Bay Area is a coalition of organizations that provide free tax help throughout the bay area led by UWBA in partnership with the IRS. Our services are free, secure, and high-quality. Tax returns are prepared by trained and IRS-certified volunteers.

We ensure taxpayers maximize their refunds by claiming cash-back tax credits like the Federal and California Earned Income Tax Credit, and the Federal and California Child Tax Credit. California residents who made less than $30,000 in 2022 may be eligible for up to $8,000 in state and federal tax credits, depending on income and family size.

Free Filing Options:

In-Person Tax Preparation and Drop-Off with over 80 sites in the Bay Area.

Online Tax Preparation: We have partnered with Code for America to offer 100% online filing.

DIY Taxes: Prepare and file your own tax return with online help from our IRS-Certified tax preparers.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

SparkPoint centers work with families to meet their basic needs, increase their income, build their credit, increase their savings, and reduce their debt. Financial coaches work one-on-one with clients to recognize behavioral outcomes, set goals, brainstorm strategies, and set realistic action plans. They value strengths, build motivation, and provide monitoring and accountability. SparkPoint serves low-income families seeking to improve their financial situation. Services are provided at no cost to community members.

SparkPoint coaches utilize a family-centered coaching model. Coaches work with clients to identify the goals and needs of their entire families and to build strong community networks. It is a trauma-informed and equity-centered approach rooted in an understanding of the persistent effects of systemic racism and poverty. SparkPoint is also a data-driven program that rigorously tracks client progress toward key financial goals.

Population(s) Served

211 is a free, confidential, information, and referral helpline that connects residents to essential health and human services. Individuals can access 211 via phone, text, or online, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in over 150 languages. 211 serves residents of all ages, genders, races, ethnicities, language speakers, employment status, and criminal backgrounds, and does not collect information on immigration status, sexual orientation, or religion. Users reach a trained information and referral specialist who assesses the full scope of their needs and refers them to appropriate local services including, food, shelter, healthcare, childcare, senior services, counseling, and disaster relief assistance.

211 Bay Area answered 20,000+ calls for immediate shelter or housing needs.

211 Bay Area has answered 55,000+ calls/texts last year and made thousands of referrals.

211 call specialists received over 20 million calls/texts last year in North America.

Population(s) Served

UWBA partners with nonprofit agencies and schools in the Bay Area to connect youth and young adults to career exploration and readiness opportunities. We recruit volunteers from our corporate partners to provide a variety of skill development workshops, such as resume writing, mock interviewing, and career demos. Our vision is for youth to have ownership and voice in their own futures, and we can only do this through engaging youth and continuing to listen to their voices. We will make sure that youth are included in spaces where they can co-create career exploration opportunities and UWBA programming.

UWBA Youth Opportunity Workforce (YOP) helps youth in 3 ways:

Explore Careers: STEM, Arts, Manufacturing, Banking, Financial

Connect to Career Paths: Career Panels, Workplace Tours, On Track Career Expo, Career Development Planning, Education Counseling, Community Advisory Council

Access Resources: Summer Internships, Soft Skills Training, Resume Review, Practice Interviews

Population(s) Served

UWBA has distributed $74 million of EFSP funds since its inception.

The Emergency Food and Shelter Program was created by Congress in 1983 to help meet the needs of hungry and homeless people throughout the United States and its territories. Money allocated through this program to Bay Area organizations is distributed through UWBA. We work tirelessly to ensure that our eight Bay Area counties continue to receive the appropriate level of funding through EFSP. The funds are used to help struggling Bay Area residents access food, shelter, rent or mortgage assistance, and help with bills and utilities.

Population(s) Served

For over 30 years, United Way Bay Area has been a partner and thought leader in providing basic needs like food, rental assistance, and emergency funding to struggling people throughout our region. One of our biggest success stories lies in the formation of the Emergency Assistance Network (EAN) of Silicon Valley, which provides emergency services to people in need.

United Way also helped establish specific criteria for organizations to call themselves an EAN, and to receive grant funding from United Way for specific kinds of programs. This streamlined the funding process,, and made it easier for known agencies to receive the money they needed. Because time is money too, staffers could spend more hours on additional fundraising efforts within their respective organizations.

Our deep connections to local nonprofits as well as our technical expertise with these kinds of operations have been pivotal in helping the Bay Area in this urgent time of need.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Unemployed people
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Unemployed people
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Unemployed people
At-risk youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Unemployed people
At-risk youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Unemployed people
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Meeting Basic Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Any individuals who directly received services by UWBA programs or UWBA grantees.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Employment and Career Opportunities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric includes any volunteers for any programs.

Number of rallies/events/conferences/lectures held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Any meetings or events where UWBA advocated for policies that benefit the community (does not include UWBA promotion events).

Number of referrals to resources offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Meeting Basic Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Includes any outgoing referrals made by UWBA or grantee partner to basic needs information or resources (211 calls, referrals to housing services, etc).

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Meeting Basic Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Includes the number of shelter meals and food pantry meals.

Number of jobs created and maintained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of job placements through our SparkPoint programs.

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of individuals who attended outreach and education events aimed at helping people access community resources or understand their rights through our SparkPoint center.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Financial Stability

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Individuals newly enrolled in public benefit program or individuals who maintained their benefit during their engagement with SparkPoint Programs.

Number of phone calls/inquiries

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Meeting Basic Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Individuals who called 211 Bay area for health and human services.

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of bed nights in a homeless shelter provided by EFSP grantee organization.

Dollars saved in tax preparation fees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Financial Stability

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Through our Free Tax Help program, able to save individuals more money through free tax preparation fees.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Employment and Career Opportunities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of youth placed in jobs

Number of clients placed in internships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Employment and Career Opportunities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of youth placed in internships

Number of one-on-one coaching sessions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of one-on-one free financial coaching sessions that occurred.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

United Way Bay Area occupies a unique position among nonprofit organizations. We cover a wide region, yet we strive to operate on a very local level in all eight counties in the Greater Bay Area. We see our regional presence as a strength and strive to take advantage of our regional presence to tackle the interconnected issues that affect all of us. UWBA is also unique in that our donors, supporters and volunteers come from all eight counties of our region. The challenge ahead of us is powering regional impact in a strategic, thoughtful, authentic and impactful way, given the needs and opportunities that outstrip our resources. By 2025, UWBA will be strongly engaged in all eight county communities, receiving input from representatives, and making program and partnership decisions based on a clear understanding of the unique needs of the region.

United Way Bay Area’s strengths lie in our innovative programs and initiatives designed to meet
current and urgent needs in our region. We design, launch, iterate, modify and expand or end programs and initiatives based on what we learn from data and insights from those most affected by our programs. We also know that our initiatives alone cannot dismantle systems – we need to pair our programs with impactful public policy advocacy to see systemic change. Over the next three years, we will revamp our existing program offerings with a stronger lens toward equity, how we incorporate our new housing justice work, and how we ensure we have the tools to do the right research to support them. By 2025, United Way Bay Area programs, initiatives, and policy advocacy will be fully aligned, informed by data, focused on racial equity, and therefore have deeper impact on dismantling the root causes of poverty and building equitable pathways to prosperity for those who need them most.

We plan to meet the greatest needs in our community, which requires engaging and inspiring the public to join in and support our work. In order to do this, we need to ensure that UWBA has the ongoing resources to invest in our initiatives and operate the programs on which so many in our communities rely. All United Ways, and particularly UWBA, know that in order to do this, we need to modernize our financial and funding models, continually connecting with more diverse individuals and institutions across the region in more impactful and inspirational ways. Because of our supporters, UWBA has been here for the community for the past 100 years. Achieving these financial growth and sustainability goals will help ensure we’re on the right track to be here for the next 100 years. By 2025, United Way Bay Area will attract greater resources from more diverse and sustainable sources, in order to invest in immediate and long-term strategies to disrupt poverty.

The four pillars of our strategic plan are Community Impact, Regional Impact, Financial Growth and Sustainability, and Operations and Culture. Each pillar is defined by a set of focus areas, and the goals we have set to address those issues.

UWBA’s strengths lie in our innovative programs and initiatives designed to meet current and urgent needs in our region. We design, launch, iterate, modify and expand or end programs and initiatives based on what we learn from data and insights from those most affected by our programs. We also know that our initiatives alone cannot dismantle systems – we need to pair our programs with impactful public policy advocacy to see systemic change. This first pillar therefore focuses on how, over the next three years, we will revamp our existing program offerings with a stronger lens towards equity, how we incorporate our new housing justice work, and how we ensure we have the tools to do the right research to support them.

UWBA occupies a unique position among nonprofit organizations. We cover a wide region, yet we strive to operate on a very local level in all eight counties in the Greater Bay Area. We see our regional presence as a strength and strive to take advantage of our regional presence to tackle the interconnected issues that affect all of us. UWBA is also unique in that our donors, supporters and volunteers come from all eight counties of our region. The challenge ahead of us is powering regional impact in a strategic, thoughtful, authentic and impactful way, given the needs and opportunities that outstrip our resources.

UWBA has bold plans to meet the greatest needs in our community, which requires engaging and inspiring the public to join in and support our work. In order to do this, we need to ensure that UWBA has the ongoing resources to invest in our initiatives and operate the programs on which so many in our communities rely. All United Ways, and particularly UWBA, know that in order to do this, we need to modernize our financial and funding models, continually connecting with more diverse individuals and institutions across the region in more impactful and inspirational ways. Because of our supporters, UWBA has been here for the community for the past 100 years. Achieving these financial growth and sustainability goals will help ensure we’re on the right track to be here for the next 100 years.

Any organization is only as good as its people, especially in the social impact sector. And our people can only do their best work when we ensure they have the systems, processes, policies and supports in place so they can thrive. Like many organizations, UWBA seeks to tackle racial injustice and systemic inequities – but that work must not solely focus outside our walls. We must focus internally as well. United Way Bay Area’s employees, leadership, volunteers and supporters must all work together to create not only a sense of inclusion and purpose, but a sense of belonging.

Founded in 1922, United Way Bay Area (UWBA) envisions an equitable Bay Area where all people have the opportunity and resources needed to live healthy, stable, and robust lives. The organization aims to reach that vision through its mission to mobilize the Bay Area to dismantle the root causes of poverty and build equitable pathways to prosperity. Through initiatives & policy change, we provide immediate and long-term support for employment, housing, financial stability, and access to health and other basic needs.

UWBA’s poverty-fighting programs and initiatives include:
• Housing Justice: A main pillar of UWBA’s mission is to reduce the number of people who are unhoused or housing burdened. The organization supports programmatic expansions and advocacy to address the acute housing crisis in the Bay Area that disproportionately affects communities of color.
• Public Policy: Advocating for public policy is critical to our mission of addressing both the root causes of poverty as well as building pathways to prosperity for families who are currently experiencing poverty.
• 211 Bay Area: A social safety net helpline, operating 24 hours every day to improve the lives of individuals by accessing local health and human services, in over 150 languages.
• SparkPoint Centers: A one-stop shop that allows low-income individuals and families to access a full range of services including financial coaching, benefits enrollment assistance, and budget planning. All Centers are a collaboration of multiple nonprofit, post-secondary institutions and government entities.
• Free Tax Help: A program in more than 100 locations across the Bay Area, we provide free tax preparation for low to moderate income households.
• Youth Opportunity Pathways: We partners across sectors to connect young people to the workforce, as research shows it increases the likelihood that they will be employed and earn family-sustaining wages later in life.
• Labor Community Services: We employ Labor Liaisons to provide direct hardship assistance, high-impact workforce programs including Trades Introduction Program in San Mateo County, and immigration legal services.
• Emergency Assistance Network (EAN): UWBA supports the Santa Clara County network of seven safety net agencies that are preventing homelessness by providing rental, utility, and food assistance. The EAN agencies also provide case management and navigation services to Santa Clara County families.
• Emergency Food and Shelter Program: We convene a board in every county of safety net agencies and run an open application process to allocate FEMA funds to support local food and shelter programs.

Our Housing Justice launched an initial round of grants, designed to fund organizations committed to advancing housing justice in the Bay Area. UWBA distributed $970,000 in Housing Justice grants to community organizations, including $250,000 through our Ambassador-led grantmaking process.

UWBA advocated for housing policies aimed at increasing the development, accessibility, and availability of affordable housing – such as SB9, SB10, AB721, TOPA, COPA – and held a legislative briefing on Emergency Rental Assistance Program (ERAP) and AB 832.

The Emergency Food and Shelter Program (EFSP) and the Emergency Assistance Network (EAN) provided Bay Area households with assistance enabling thousands of families to overcome financial crises and remain in their homes. UWBA provided 1,754 Bay Area families with direct financial assistance for hardships or case management and connection to other local social services agencies.

UWBA advocated for a federal one-time Child Tax Credit payment increase, ensuring the federal budget does not cut essential funding for the Emergency Food and Shelter Program.

Our Free Tax Help sites expanded services both in-person and virtually at 98 locations throughout the region. Our tax sites continued to provide free tax preparation services much further into the year due to extended tax seasons while also providing services for an entirely new client population – those clients who typically do not file taxes but needed to claim critical EIP (stimulus) resources. UWBA met with federal and state representatives resulting in the expansion of the Golden Stimulus, CalEITC and the Child Tax Credit.

SparkPoint Centers continued to strengthen their basic needs support by expanding access to resources and services including distributing food and rental relief. SparkPoint centers moved toward a hybrid model of services to meet clients both virtually and in person to better support access to public benefits and financial coaching services.

Highlights
• $1,3M+ in rental assistance to 595 low- income households across the 8 Bay Area counties.
• 5.2M + in food distributions (equivalent to 4,408,764 pounds of food), 4, 598, 836 meals, and 151,930 shelter bed nights provided which UWBA, EFSP, EAN and partner agencies helped to provide.
• $53M+ in state and federal tax refunds for 29,694 Bay Area residents from Free Tax Help tax returns
• 13,091 individuals received basic needs services through SparkPoint centers, with 2,722 individuals and families receiving free financial coaching. Despite economic hardships, 78% of clients made progress towards their financial goals in FY22.
• 49,576 211 calls and texts responded and 57,169 website inquiries providing Bay Area residents with a total of 109, 673 referrals.
• 423 individuals placed into job through SparkPoint, Youth Workforce, and Labor Community Services, combined, including 25 youth who were placed in jobs or internships and 30 individuals placed in pre-apprenticeship programs.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

United Way of the Bay Area
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Way of the Bay Area

Board of directors
as of 06/21/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Pierre Breber

Chevron Corporation

Term: 2019 - 2024

Kevin Johnson

Dodge & Cox

Michelle Branch

Branch Law Group

Pete Manzo

United Ways of California

Eric T. Street

Enterprise Rent-A-Car Company of San Francisco, LLC

Gioia McCarthy

Bank of America

Anissa Basoco-Villarreal

Alameda County

Alexis Krivkovich

McKinsey & Company

Rudy Gonzalez

Building & Construction Trade Council, AFL-CIO and City of San Francisco

Alice A. Chen

HealthTech Executive

Ousmane Caba

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)

Joy Alafia

Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (CAMFT)

Ruby Bolaria-Shifrin

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/9/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/05/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.