JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, INC.

To inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy.

aka Junior Achievement of Northern California   |   Walnut Creek, CA   |  https://norcal.ja.org/

Mission

Junior Achievement's purpose is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy.

Junior Achievement maintains an active vision, front and center, on how we can have a positive impact on the lives of more students which are guided by our core values:

1. Belief in the boundless potential of young people.

2. Commitment to the principles of market-based economics and entrepreneurship.

3. Passion for what we do and honesty, integrity, and excellence in how we do it.

4. Respect for the talents, creativity, perspectives, and backgrounds of all individuals.

5. Belief in the power of partnership and collaboration.

6. Assurance in the educational and motivational impact of relevant, hands-on learning.

Ruling year info

1994

President and CEO

Ms. Cristene Burr

Main address

3003 Oak Road, Suite 130

Walnut Creek, CA 94597 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Junior Achievement of the Bay Area, Inc.

Junior Acheivement of Silicon Valley and Monterey Bay

Junior Acheivement of San Joaquin Valley

Junior Acheivement of the Redwood Empire

EIN

94-1322179

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Business, Youth Development (O53)

Voluntarism Promotion (T40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

42% of employers rated the overall preparation of high school graduates for entry-level jobs as deficient.
In the United States, close to 30,000 youth ages 16-24 are neither in school nor employed.
1/4 of all jobs in the United States require a high-level STEM knowledge.
28% of Americans have nothing in their savings accounts.
95% of high school students have never been exposed to a workplace setting.
57% of children live in poverty or a low income household with an income less than $46,000 for a family of four.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

JA Be Entrepreneurial

JA Be Entrepreneurial challenges students, through interactive classroom activities, to start their own entrepreneurial venture while still in high school. The program provides useful, practical content to assist teens in the transition from being students to productive, contributing members of society. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Career Success equips students with the knowledge required to get and keep a job in high-growth industries. Students will explore the crucial workplace skills employers seek but often find lacking in young employees. Students also will learn about valuable tools to find that perfect job, including resumes, cover letters, and interviewing techniques. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Company Program unlocks the innate ability in high school students to fill a need or solve a problem in their community by launching a business venture and unleashing their entrepreneurial spirit. The program focuses on Company Ops, the majority of meeting time, where students build and manage their business. Meeting-specific, student-friendly materials and resources increase student interaction and emphasize JA’s experiential approach to learning. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Economics for Success gives students the information needed to build strong personal finances, a cornerstone to a happy, secure life. Students learn the importance of exploring career options based on their skills, interests, and values. They also learn about spending money within a budget; saving and investing wisely; and using credit cautiously. (Grades 6-8)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Economics reinforces concepts of micro- and macro-economics by having students explore the basic characteristics of the U.S. economic system and how economic principles influence business decisions. It also introduces students to consumer issues, such as saving, investing, and taxation. (Grades 11-12)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Exploring Economics uses hands-on activities to explain complex economic concepts such as supply and demand, inflation, and the production, distribution and consumption of goods. It gives insight into the effect governments and individuals have on the global economy— and on the price of a loaf of bread. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Finance Park is a month-long program that introduces students to personal financial planning and career exploration. At the culmination of this teacher-led program, students visit JA Finance Park, a realistic on-site or virtual community, to put into practice what they've learned by developing and committing to a personal budget. (Middle School and High School)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Global Marketplace - Blended Model gives students an opportunity to experience the impact and importance of international business by playing the role of business owners and managers. (Grades 6-8)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Global Marketplace takes students on a spin around the world. Students learn the products they use every day, like their backpacks and sneakers, might use raw material from one country, be assembled in another, and sold from Peking to Chicago. The program helps students understand how goods flow through various economies and the effect globalization has on their lives. (Grades 6-8)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA It's My Business! encourages students to use critical thinking to learn entrepreneurial skills. Those skills include knowing customers' wants and needs, launching effective marketing, and creating detailed business plans. By examining the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, students learn that a belief in one's self can make positive things happen in life. (Grades 6-8)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA It’s My Future provides practical information about preparing for the working world. Students learn about career clusters, high-growth jobs, career planning, and creating a personal brand. And, through a scavenger hunt, they are introduced to the basic aspects of job hunting. (Grades 6-8)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Job Shadow prepares students to be entrepreneurial thinkers in their approach to work. In-class sessions prepare students for a visit to a professional work environment, where they will face a series of challenges administered by their workplace hosts. Students learn how to research career opportunities and the skills needed to land and keep their dream job. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA More than Money teaches students about earning, spending, sharing, and saving money. It also identifies businesses that students can start or jobs they can perform to earn money. Students play a game to learn money-management skills and to better understand the role and importance of money in their lives. (Grades 3-5)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Our City introduces students to the characteristics of cities and how cities are shaped by zoning. Students also learn about the importance of money to a city; how financial institutions help businesses and city residents; and how the media is an integral part of a city's life. Students learn the role of an entrepreneur by exploring what it takes to open a restaurant. (Grade 3)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Our Community uses posters and games to offer practical information about businesses and the many jobs those businesses offer in a community. Students explore production methods through a simulation game, and they learn about taxes, decision making, and how money flows in an economy. (Grade 2)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Our Families explains how family members' jobs and businesses contribute to the well-being of the family and of the community. The program introduces the concept of needs and wants and explores the ways families plan for and acquire goods and services. Students analyze their own skills to determine ways they can support their families. (Grade 1)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Our Region introduces students to entrepreneurship and how entrepreneurs use resources to produce goods and services in a region. Students operate a hypothetical hot dog stand to understand the fundamental tasks performed by a business owner and to track the revenue and expenses of a business. (Grade 4)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Ourselves uses storybook characters in read-aloud and hands-on activities to introduce the role people play in an economy. Through engaging, volunteer-led activities, young students learn about individual choices, money, the importance of saving and giving, and the value of work. (Kindergarten)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Personal Finance-Blended Model demonstrates the relationship between financial decisions made now and future financial freedom and quality of life. Students learn that a positive financial future requires making smart choices about education, a career, and saving and investing. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Personal Finance explores the fundamental elements of personal finances: earnings, saving and investing, budgeting, credit, risk management, and giving. Students apply these elements to a personal financial plan that allows them to set specific goals for their lifelong financial needs and desired quality of life. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Titan allows students to operate a virtual company through a Web-based simulation. The students' success depends on decisions about their product's price and their company's marketing, research and development, and business practices. Win or lose, students gain an understanding of how management decisions affect a company's bottom line. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of JA Volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

JA has over 3,000 registered business, parent, and community volunteers who participate throughout our in-school and after-school programs.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

More than 55% of JA students across Northern California are participating in the Free or Reduced Meal Program.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Develop brand recognition, community engagement, and organizational growth through a metric-driven approach.
2. Grow annual volunteer engagement to ensure impactful program service delivery.
3. Shift program mix to more high-touch, high-impact programs such as Capstone, R&D, and High School programs.
4. Increase board effectiveness and engagement to grow funding and volunteer partnerships, diversify revenue base, and establish donor pipeline.

JA engages corporate partners to support programming and serve as volunteer mentors and teachers. The relationships between youth and adult business role models help young people navigate the complex issues and challenges they must address in order to succeed. JA's student-teacher-volunteer partnership provides innovative, experiential learning opportunities that benefit all partners:

- Students are fully prepared for business volunteer interactions; they learn how to identify and link job opportunities to career interests and skill set; they gain real-world experience, understand business behavior, and realize the link between school, work, and success.

- Corporate partners / business volunteers develop skills and learn more about themselves as they interact with inquisitive, innovative-thinking students. Volunteers feel satisfied knowing they've engaged in an activity that makes a meaningful difference; they've helped a young person discover their strengths and set themselves on a path to achieve their greatest potential.

Since 1950, JA of Northern California has utilized corporate and community volunteer-led programming to educate thousands of K-12th grade students on the latest 21st Century skills. JA's unique approach allows volunteers from the community to deliver nationally researched/designed and customized curriculum while sharing their experiences with students. These real-world business volunteers transform the key concepts of financial literacy and economic empowerment - how to generate wealth and effectively manage it; how to create jobs which make their communities more robust; how to apply entrepreneurial thinking to the workplace - into a message that inspires and empowers students to believe in themselves and realize that they can make a difference in the world.

JA of Northern California is currently working within a 5-year "refresh" strategic plan in order to better link priorities and strategies to guiding principles; incorporate a greater use of technology; promote blending learning models; weave entrepreneurial thinking and problem-solving in real-world learning; and ensure the most effective and satisfying volunteer experience for business partners that produces the highest impact on our student learners.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, INC.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, INC.

Board of directors
as of 5/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Adrian Demich

AT&T

Term: 2017 -

Adrian Dimech

AT&T

Cristene Burr

JA NorCal

Thomas Quinlan

Reed Smith, LLP

Michael Day

CSAA/Retired

Kevin Coleman

KPMG, LLP

Matthew Davis

Aon Risk Solutions

Carla Boragno

Roche

Sean Crabtree

Accenture

Vinicius David

Hewlett Packard

Elaine Genevro

Union Bank

Brad Holsworth

Burr, Pilger, Mayer Inc

Jennifer Stephenson

CSAA Insurance Group

Mary Huss

San Francisco Business Times

Chris Jacobs

Cisco Service

Mark Linsky

Retired/Hewlett Pacard Company

Louis Lombardo

Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co.

Robert Muzio

Comerica Bank

Dean Nicolacakis

PwC

William Oldenburg

Retired/Dreyer's Grand Ice Cream

Bill Schlough

San Francisco Giants

Mark Secker

EY

Marc Singer

McKinsey & Company, Inc

Eric Sleigh

Thomson Reuters

Steve Sprinkle

E & J Gallo Winery

Stephen Troy

AeroFund Financial, Inc

Alyson Griffin

Norah Nicholls

Deloitte

Karthik Suri

Invitae

Mark Asher

Retired/Adobe

David Colby

Salesforce

Nghi Huynh

Armanino

Shakeya McDow

Kaiser Permanente

Johhny Montes

JPMorgan Chase

Tony Perazzo

Grant Thornton

Orin Pierce

Bank of the West

Dina Ting

Franklin Templeton

Hugo Yoshinga

Google Cloud

Jim Davis

Delta Air Lines

Chris Moulton

U.S. Bank

Jeff Salvesen

Charles Schwab & Co.

Jake Streit

West Coast Corp. Banking

Blair Braud

Bank of the West

Carrie Ericson

A.T. Kearney

Eric Fusilero

Splunk

Jobina Fortson

ABC7

Kesh Subramanian

GE Digital

Moon Javaid

49ers

Heather Nguyen

Bank of America

Shirley Stacy

Align Technology

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data