PLATINUM2024

Sequoia Parks Conservancy

aka Sequoia Natural History Association, Sequoia Parks Foundation   |   Three Rivers, CA   |  https://sequoiaparksconservancy.org/

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Mission

The mission of Sequoia Parks Conservancy is to fund and enable projects and programs that protect, preserve, and provide access to the natural and cultural resources of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks and Lake Kaweah.

Ruling year info

1970

Executive Director

Savannah Boiano

Main address

47050 Generals Highway #10

Three Rivers, CA 93271 USA

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Formerly known as

Sequoia Natural History Association

Sequoia Parks Foundation

EIN

94-1379633

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (T12)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Sequoia Parks Conservancy is the official nonprofit partner of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks and is built on decades of support for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. This legacy demonstrates a longstanding commitment and contribution to the parks and their surrounding communities, including the US Army Corps of Engineers at Lake Kaweah. ​The Conservancy is a key connection point with park visitors and provides important services, educational programs, and funding in support of park priorities. Areas of growth include: + Become a stronger, more consistently governed, managed, and sustainable organization + Develop a philanthropy program to increase funding for park priorities, support conservancy/park collaboration, and engage a broader community on behalf of the parks and the conservancy + Strengthen existing programs and retail operations as a priority while strategically assessing opportunities for retail growth and new program development

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Sequoia Conservation Fund

Giant sequoias, Sequoiadendron giganteum, are a large, long-lived pioneer species found on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California and are currently found in approximately 75 scattered groves within mixed conifer forests.

Giant sequoias rely on fire to open cones and create mineral soil conditions and high sunlight conditions for seedling germination. Mature giant sequoia trees can live to be thousands of years old, and until recently their primary cause of death was falling over. However, today, giant sequoias face three major threats:
- burning up in high severity fires;
- being killed by drought-mediated insect attack (between
20 and 30 monarch sequoias have died this way within Sequoia National Park); and
- death from other unanticipated impacts of climate change such as altered hydrology, snowpack, or other factors.

Sequoia Parks Conservancy is actively raising money to combat climate change and its effect on giant sequoias.

Population(s) Served

Two species of mountain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa and Rana sierrae) occur in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks and are integral to high mountain lake systems. These once abundant amphibians play a critical role in maintaining biodiversity in these ecosystems, but they have disappeared from more than 92% of historic sites in the Sierra Nevada, with similarly large losses in the parks.

Restoring mountain yellow-legged frog populations is a high priority for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks and Sequoia Parks Conservancy. A list of urgent needs for the frog restoration program has been developed and includes select frog recovery actions for transport, antifungal medication, disease testing, and supplies needed to salvage 200 animals from two vulnerable populations and conduct zoo-based antifungal treatment, captive rearing, and immunization before reintroduction back to the wild.

Population(s) Served

Communicating the numerous accessibility opportunities such as trails and visitor services at these parks is essential. This project involves four main components: developing detailed digital guides, tours, and videos related to the accessibility of park features; providing accessibility training for park employees and partners; seeking visitor feedback about usability for completed accessibility projects; replacing our standard wheelchairs that we loan to the public with all-terrain versions, and improving our messaging about this program.

By improving our messaging about accessibility and providing it in a variety of formats, park visitors will be better educated on the opportunities and prepared for conditions at these parks, furthering the accessibility legacy.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
People with physical disabilities

In the evening of September 9, 2021, a lightning storm came through Sequoia National Park. Fire erupted and national park firefighters responded to local ignitions. By September 14, there was a mandatory evacuation of Ash Mountain, Lodgepole, Wuksachi Lodge, and Three Rivers, CA. Donations to the KNP Complex Fire Recovery Fund for Sequoia National Park will fund efforts to rebuild trails, protect sequoia groves and meadows, safeguard cultural and historic features, reestablish access to Crystal Cave, restore wildlife habitat, and more.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of individuals who visit Crystal Cave each year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Closed due to Covid-19, damage to road caused by wildfire.

Number of children reached through the Education and Outreach program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Financial and inkind aid to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Sequoia Parks Conservancy provides financial and in kind aid to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

Complete the $1,000,000 goal for the KNP Complex Fire Recovery Fund.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

KNP Complex Fire Recovery Fund

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Sequoia Parks Conservancy works hand in hand with the National Park Service to preserve, protect, and provide access to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Critical park programs funded by the Conservancy is visible throughout both parks in wildlife management, trails and access, search and rescue, education and outreach and resource management and science. Sequoia Parks Conservancy also provides exceptional visitor experiences through outdoor education programs and management of the visitor centers and bookstores.

Initiatives as outlined by the 2018-2022 strategic plan include:

1. Create a five-year vision statement
2. Strengthen board governance and committee structure
3. Invest in executive leadership and staff development
4. Systematize and document business operations
5. Redefine Sequoia Park Conservancy’s membership program
6. Diversify earned revenue opportunities

Sequoia Parks Conservancy connects people to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks through exceptional visitor experiences and educational programs and asks them to invest in those experiences through a variety of philanthropic strategies to help preserve, protect and provide access to the parks. Sequoia Parks Conservancy is experiencing unprecedented growth and maturity and with that comes opportunities to build new programs, relationships, and revenue streams. Those opportunities are put through the filter of SPC’s mission and strategic plan to maximize capacity.

Priority 1. Create a five-year vision statement
Complete

Priority 2. Strengthen board governance and committee structure
In 2019, the Sequoia Parks Conservancy board of directors updated the board governance and committee structure to support the Conservancy in its new, more complex role as a park partner.

Priority 3: Invest in executive leadership and staff development
The board of directors hired a strong executive director in 2018 who has been with the organization for more than thirteen years. In addition, the director of philanthropy, director of communications, finance director, and field institute director positions have all been filled. Senior staff all attend the Public Lands Alliance Conference each year to network amongst peers and learn best practices for the industry.

Priority 4:
Systematize and document business operations:
SPC focused on process clarity in all administrative functions. SPC invested time and resources into documenting, training, tracking, and updating things such as employee and facility safety, human resources functions,and financial processes, so that our business practices are strong contributors to a sound business model.

Priority 5:
Redefine Sequoia Park Conservancy’s membership program
The 2019 membership program aims to increase overall support through member/donor acquisition and retention using an approachable, inclusive price point. Taking what we have learned from previous year’s data, the membership program moved to a one-level system to encourage (1) timeliness of service during high-volume seasons; (2) simplifying the membership process; (3) promote approachable price points/inclusivity; and (4) a higher crossover between members and donors

Priority 6:
Diversify earned revenue opportunities
SPC has tapped into and expanded existing revenue-earning departments for greater earning potential and offered programs and services that appealed to previously unserved visitors. For example, more niche tours in Crystal Cave were offered through the Field Institute generating significant income. Also, the retail educational product line was modified to include more appealing items for younger generations.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Sequoia Parks Conservancy
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Sequoia Parks Conservancy

Board of directors
as of 02/29/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Matthew Macia

Peoples Bank

Term: 2020 -

Dave Camenson

Camenson Law

Matt Colby

REI

Susan Moffet

Boston Consulting

John Rowden

Retired

Kelley Oien Perez

Diane Aden Hayes

Kaweah Delta Foundatoin

Lu Plauzoles

Retired Business Owner

Joseph Chadwick

Self employed

James Holly

Retired, Bank of the Sierra

Matthew Edgell

Peoples Bank

Robert Schwan

Founding Partner, Gjelina and The Tasting Kitchen

Sam Highly

All Roads North

Isaac Sinnott

Crystal O'Grady

Ann Brumbaugh

Attorney

Mark Vickers-Willis

New Roads School

Matthew Macia

Peoples Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/28/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data