The Arc San Francisco

For people with intellectual and developmental disabilities

aka The Arc San Francisco   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.thearcsf.org

Mission

To transform the lives of adults with developmental disabilities by advancing lifelong learning, personal achievement and independence. We envision a community where disability is a distinction without a difference. We believe all persons are inherently valuable, have potential to learn, and are entitled to services and supports that foster their growth.

Ruling year info

1954

Executive Director

Ms. Kristen Pedersen

Main address

1500 Howard St

San Francisco, CA 94103 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Aid Retarded Children

Association for Retarded Citizens

The Arc San Francisco

EIN

94-1415287

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Health Support Services (E60)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In the early 50s, a small group of parents and other concerned individuals came together to act as voices for change. At the time, little was known about developmental disabilities or the potential of individuals with different abilities to learn and achieve their best. There were virtually no programs in communities to assist in the development and personal growth of individuals with developmental disabilities--or to support families.

Like every parent, the founding parents of The Arc wanted their sons and daughters to lead fulfilling lives in the community with opportunities for education, socialization, jobs and independence--just like everyone else. It was in that spirit that The Arc San Francisco, now supporting adults with developmental disabilities across 3 counties, was founded. We believe all persons are inherently valuable, have potential to learn, and are entitled to services and supports that foster their growth.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Employment Services

The Arc of San Francisco takes a holistic approach toward generating the right match between the client and the employer, and basic skills evaluation and training is core to our methodology. Through Employment Services, The Arc of San Francisco provides a continuum of offerings to suit various individual needs that include the following:
·        *Situational Assessment identifies level of functioning, strengths, limitations, and provides information to assist with placement potential, using a variety of work environments in the community.

·        *Vocational Assessment involves a combination of written and hands-on short-term assessments to evaluate basic skills in academics, office services, computer, telephone and technology.

·        *Job Exploration assists clients with identifying work interests by visiting and observing specific job sites and job functions.

·        *Personal and Social Adjustment are services that work with the clients to address identified barriers to employment, such as grooming and hygiene, and social skills. Time-limited, individualized training is provided in the most appropriate environment.

·        *Employment Preparation includes intake and screening, identification of employment goals, development of an individualized service plan, and participation in job seeking skills training. Staff members and volunteers from the business community assist with developing a resume, filling out applications, providing interview preparations and mock interviews, and consulting with the client's support system (family or siblings) to assist with the placement planning.

·        *Job Placement services identify specific job opening(s) that is/are appropriate for each client based on his/her identified strengths and weaknesses, and assists him/her in becoming employable. These services include: interface with technology such as telephone and computer; job search; arranging and attending interviews with the client; discussion and negotiation with employers; coordination of placement activities; completing all paperwork; and ensuring appropriate short-term transition.

·        *Job Coaching assists clients with integrating into a specific work culture and environment -- both on a social and professional level. Job Coaching also involves educating co-workers and supervisors about effective ways to work with a person with a disability. Staff from The Arc will train with the client on-site, for as long as necessary or until the individual acquires skills to do the job independently. Follow-up will occur at anywhere from two times per month to several times per week subsequent to initial training.

The work that clients of The Arc can perform well includes simple and repetitive tasks such as collating, shredding, recycling, or photocopying. These are not "make-work" jobs. They involve many of the mundane but necessary activities that needlessly occupy the time of more highly paid employees. These tasks typically have to be "carved out" from existing job activities. By identifying these tasks and delegating them to our clients, businesses can realize significant time and payroll savings, improve the efficiency and morale of the general workforce, and perform a vital community service that brings inspiration to everyone in the workplace.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Arc San Francisco's Center for Health & Wellness serves more than 160 adults with developmental disabilities with baseline wellness screenings, nutritional and fitness consulting, health advocacy for medical appointments and treatment, and preventative care that reduces the need for emergency room visits.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

The Arc SF Path to College, is a collaboration between City College of San Francisco (CCSF), University of California San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), University of Massachusetts, Boston – Think College, and Special Olympics Northern CA/Nevada. These organizations believe, as we do, in the value of providing adults with disabilities including autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and other diagnoses with the chance to experience and benefit from academic, social, and personal growth within a community college setting.

The purpose of this effort is to:
• provide an education as a launch pad to meaningful careers and independence;
• begin to break the cycle of poverty and dependence for this chronically unemployed and underemployed population
• advance inclusion of students with I/DD in post-secondary academic and social activities from which they have largely been excluded
• improve how post-secondary educators apply universal design for learning (UDL), thereby improving outcomes for all learners
• provide experiences that shape their internal identity as a college student capable of learning and using learning experiences to further their careers;
• eliminate key barriers that have prevented people with intellectual disabilities from achieving self-sufficiency and economic stability.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Employment and Community Services - 3 Year Accreditation 2016

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Employment and Community Services 2019

Awards

GOLD 2016

Guide Star

GOLD 2019

Guide Star

Platinum 2021

Guide Star

Affiliations & memberships

The ARC of the United States 1951

United Way Member Agency 2016

CARF 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of older adults being supported to live at home through home care, assistive technology, and/or personal support plans

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Seniors, Older adults

Related Program

Continuing Education: Arc Path to College

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of computer literacy/skills/technology courses conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Seniors, Young adults

Related Program

Continuing Education: Arc Path to College

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Digital literacy classes include beginning, intermediate and advanced, podcasting and desktop publishing, and in 2020, remote education through www.thearcsfhub.org

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The 2017-2020 Fast Forward Strategic Plan has articulate three key goals:
Client Success
Operational Excellence
Trust & Transparency

Client Success:
Implement True Client-Centered Planning;
Grow Health & Wellness;
Expand and Enhance Opportunities
Operational Excellence:
Invest in Process & Technology;
Recruit, Recognize & Reward Staff;
Optimize Real Estate Assets;
Reposition, Rebrand, Rename;
Expand & Create New Funding Streams
Trust & Transparency:
Build Effective Family & Community Engagement Model

With the help of our Board of Directors, External Consultants including volunteers from Harvard Business School, and generous grantors and donors, we have analyzed our Strategic Goals and plans for achieving them over a three year period. The Fast Forward Strategic Plan is a clearly stated, timed roadmap to reach the goals determined by the Board by 2020. It will take time, energy and resources to accomplish, but sub-committees, each with a board and staff lead, are moving the needle forward on each goal and objective, with regular reporting to the Board and Community.

2020 was the final year of the 3 year plan, and tracking continued activities that address each goal. With a leadership transition and the onset of COVID 19 pandemic in early 2020, the plan is being completed at this time and a new strategic planning process will begin in Spring 2021.

The Plan is posted on our website and reviewed regularly by Arc leadership and board.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    There has been so much discussion back and forth about whether or not to require the COVID vaccine for all staff and participants once it is available. Based on feedback, it has been decided that we will strongly encourage, but not require, vaccinations.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

The Arc San Francisco
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Arc San Francisco

Board of directors
as of 2/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Ellen Hanscom

Deloitte LLP

Term: 2016 - 2021

Ellen Hanscom

Deloitte, LLP

Michel Kapulica

Ernst & Young

John Beeler

Salesforce

Sejo Jahic

Echo Technology Solutions

David Carvel

Siena Medical

Gloria Louie

Human Resources Consultant

Carolyn Salcido

California College of The Arts

Greg Vogel

GKV Capital

Leah Van der Mei

California Academy of Sciences

Christine Totah

Disability Community Volunteer

Alex Locust

SF AIDS Foundation

Andrew Collier

Self-Advocate

Sarah Lim

Self-Advocate

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/01/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.