SILVER2024

GIRLS INCORPORATED OF THE ISLAND CITY

aka Girls Inc. of the Island City   |   Alameda, CA   |  www.girlsincislandcity.org

Mission

Girls Inc. of the Island City is an affiliate of Girls Inc. Our mission is to inspire all girls to be strong (healthy), smart (educated), and bold(independent) through innovative programs, activities, and advocacy. Since 1964, we have empowered more than 30,000 girls to realize their potential as fearless, goal-oriented young women. Trained staff and volunteers build lasting, mentoring relationships in girls-only spaces that are physically and emotionally safe where girls find a sisterhood of support with shared drive, mutual respect, and high expectations. Our programs inspire girls to grow and develop skills in science, math, technology, personal development, financial literacy, life skills, physical activity, and the arts—and to build successful frameworks for their futures.

Ruling year info

1965

Chief Executive Officer

Jennifer Pigza, Ph.D.

Main address

1724 Santa Clara Ave

Alameda, CA 94501 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-1581103

NTEE code info

Girls Clubs (O22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Today, girls continue to encounter significant obstacles to their well-being and success.
1 in 4 girls will not finish high school.
78% of girls are unhappy with their bodies by age 17.
3 in 10 girls will become pregnant before the age of 20.
1 in 5 girls will be a victim of childhood sexual abuse.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

GRUFF, Girls Reading to Understanding Furry Friends

GRUFF, Girls Reading to Understanding Furry Friends, is a fun and innovative reading literacy program in partnership with Friends of the Alameda Animal Shelter (FAAS). It provides girls the opportunity to practice reading in a non-judgmental environment while helping to socialize shelter animals.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Girls, ages 6 to 12, develop self-reliance and life skills
by participating in a multi-workshop program that teaches them interview skills, script writing, public speaking, and professional etiquette. They then apply the skills they learn by interacting with the women and teens who receive the Women Who Dare awards. The girls meet and interview all the awardees, explore a large range of career paths, learn the real-life stories of women who impact the community, and meet new role models. At the Women Who Dare awards ceremony, the girls co-host the event, network with guests, and present the awards to the awardees.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Eureka! is a national, five-year program that encourages teens to explore career paths in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The program consists of four weeks of intensive programming during the summer and additional sessions throughout the school year. Designed to meet the intellectual, social, physical, and emotional needs of adolescent girls, programming combines STEM subjects with sports and personal and professional development activities. The program also requires adult mentors and job shadow experiences in the science and non-traditional fields.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adolescents

Ethical Fashion Show is a unique program developed at GIIC that goes beyond the national Girls Inc. curriculum. It features a runway show competition that promotes conscious consumerism and zero-waste practices by showcasing outfits made from upcycled materials. Teen designers and models spend six weeks in intensive, hands-on workshops in design, patterning, sewing, and finishing; modeling and public speaking; and creating a business plan. The teens are mentored and the show is judged by business professionals from the fashion industry.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adolescents

Passport to Success, a series of workshops for teens, empowers girls by enabling them to learn new information, acquire and develop skills, build self-confidence, and have fun. The series is comprised of five workshops that promote college readiness, self-sufficiency, leadership, personal safety, and positive decision making.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adolescents

GEMS is a school-site program in partnership with the Alameda Unified School District (AUSD) that was developed to support social emotional learning for all elementary girls. It was developed in response to an AUSD Health and Wellness survey that indicated stress, bullying, and peer pressure were some of the biggest issues facing students at all grade levels at AUSD.

Girls Inc. of the Island City was already providing social-emotional learning to girls and teens in their after-school program based on the national Girls Inc. curriculum. GEMS was developed using some of the same curriculums including the following:
• Be BOLD, a component of Girls Inc. Project BOLD
• Action for Safety, a component of Girls Inc. Project BOLD
• Girls encourage, a component of Girls Inc. Sporting Chance
• Girls Inc. Friendly PEERsuasion
• Girls Inc. Job Ready
• Mind & Body Curriculum.

GEMS currently serves 200 girls at nine local schools.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of girls served with holistic, high-impact experiences enabling them to grow up healthy, educated and independent.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, At-risk youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Girls Inc. of the Island City creates trusting relationships with adult mentors, hands-on, minds-on experiences for girls that address their ability to grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Girls Inc. aims to overcome the significant obstacles that girls face by helping them explore and celebrate their strengths, their voices, who they are today, and who they will become. Girls Inc. equips girls to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers and grow up healthy, educated, and independent. Girls build confidence and embrace positive decision-making to take charge of their health and well-being, and achieve academic, personal and career goals.

As we embark on a new strategic direction, building from our current position of strength, our goals for the future include:
- Girls Inc. program framework will effectively deliver desired outcomes for girls.
- Girls Inc. will have strong affiliates that are able to consistently deliver a high-quality Girls Inc. Experience.
- Girls Inc. will grow the number of low income girls served with the Girls Inc. program model.
- Girls Inc. will expand its impact by becoming a leading advocate for advancing the rights and opportunities for all girls.
- Girls Inc. will have the necessary resources, systems, and supports to be a data-driven and performance oriented network and external influencer.

Girls Inc. program framework will effectively deliver desired outcomes for girls: affiliates align behind a network-wide approach to reaching girls with an intensive, holistic approach that is distinctive to Girls Inc.

Girls Inc. will have strong affiliates that are able to consistently deliver a high-quality Girls Inc. Experience: affiliates align with common business practices and strategic goals to emphasize sustainability and risk mitigation, opening the way to innovative reach to new communities.

Girls Inc. will grow the number of low income girls served with the Girls Inc. program model: affiliates are recognized experts in their local areas, anchored into the fabric of the communities where they serve girls who most need the Girls Inc. Experience.

Girls Inc. will expand its impact by becoming a leading advocate for advancing the rights and opportunities for all girls: the network engages in advocacy at the national, state, and local levels, as appropriate, with a particular focus on the needs of girls from low-income communities and girls who face multiple, intersectional challenges such as those based on sex, race, ethnicity, immigration status, sexual orientation, and gender identity. We are committed to a “girl-centered" advocacy approach that prioritizes the lived experiences of girls in our network and lifts up their voices; we aim to empower girls with the tools necessary to be change agents in their communities and beyond.

Girls Inc. will have the necessary resources, systems, and supports to be a data-driven and performance oriented network and external influencer: The Girls Inc. Outcomes Measurement Strategy is designed to help us understand and showcase the measurable difference we make in the lives of Girls Inc. girls. Gathering information about outcomes for girls will, over time, meet three important purposes for the Girls Inc. network:
- Mission accomplishment – how well are we working toward the Girls Inc. mission?
- Performance management - how well are we meeting our objectives?
- Evaluation – how do we know that we are having the impact we aspire to have?

Girls Inc. program framework will effectively deliver desired outcomes for girls: The program framework has been established and shared with all affiliates to drive planning.
Girls Inc. will have strong affiliates that are able to consistently deliver a high-quality Girls Inc. Experience: the business model has been established and shared with affiliates to bolster planning.
Girls Inc. will grow the number of low income girls served with the Girls Inc. program model: 17 affiliates have received more than $3M in investment capital to expand; over the next three years 60 affiliates will receive more than $20M in investment capital.
Girls Inc. will expand its impact by becoming a leading advocate for advancing the rights and opportunities for all girls: the policy framework has been developed in conjunction with the Girls Advocacy Committee (girls) and Public Policy Committee (adults).
Girls Inc. will have the necessary resources, systems, and supports to be a data-driven and performance oriented network and external influencer: Girls Inc. has engaged an outside evaluator to conduct a quasi-experimental study of our aggregate outcomes data.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

GIRLS INCORPORATED OF THE ISLAND CITY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

GIRLS INCORPORATED OF THE ISLAND CITY

Board of directors
as of 03/25/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Carolyn Thomas

Retired

Term: 2016 - 2023

Linda Felts

Retired

Carolyn Thomas

HR Consultant

Claudia Page

Health Care Consultant

Ann Blake

Maggie Derr

McKinsey and Company

Sandy Hobson

Ashley McLaughlin

San Francisco State University

Dede Tabor

Anne Gooch

Retired US Coast Guard

Suzanne Harris

JP Morgan Chase

Sarah Oddie

Office of Alameda County Supervisor

Matt Bliven

Retired Coast Guard

Michael Chae

Playworks

Nanette Hunter

D-Unique Tools

Carolyn Lantz

Retired

Jennyfer Lindsey

Productboard

Christopher Moody

Google

Alice Myerhoff

Myerhoff Consulting

Lauren Silverstein

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable