FACES SF

Nurture. Teach. Empower.

aka Florence Crittenton Services - Whitney Young Child Development Center   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.facessf.org

Mission

Our mission is to nurture, teach and empower San Francisco’s children and families to transform their lives. FACES SF provides critical assistance to low-income families citywide, with a focus in the Haight Ashbury, Western Addition, Visitacion Valley, and Bayview Hunters Point neighborhoods in the following areas: early childhood development, workforce training, school-age enrichment programs, and family support services. Family and Child Empowerment Services – San Francisco (FACES SF), a community-based non-profit organization, representing the combination of two of San Francisco’s most enduring service organizations: Florence Crittenton Services and Whitney Young Child Development Center.

Ruling year info

1977

Chief Executive Officer

Lawland Long

Main address

1101 Masonic Ave

San Francisco, CA 94117 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Whitney Young Child Development Center

Florence Crittenton Services

Family and Child Empowerment Services - San Francisco

EIN

94-1637699

NTEE code info

Kindergarten, Nursery Schools, Preschool, Early Admissions (B21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

FACES SF is working to close the wealth gap in some of San Francisco's most disadvantaged neighborhoods by providing children and families with a holistic pathway to long term self-sufficiency. We recognize that economic empowerment is multifaceted, which is why we provide families with early childhood education, counseling and support services, and a comprehensive workforce development program. We are focused on supporting struggling San Francisco families by working to close the education achievement gap early, helping our families build strong bonds with one another, and guiding them into successful careers. We are the result of a merger between the Whitney Young Child Development Center and Florence Crittenton Services in 2011, from which we inherited over 190 years of serving San Francisco's unique, multicultural community. Help us continue this legacy.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Masonic Preschool

FACES SF has a preschool located on Masonic Ave and Page St. This preschool serves low-income families in the community.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

FACES SF Preschool in the Bayview on Whitney Young Circle. This preschool serves toddlers to 5 year olds from low-income families.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

FACES SF After School Program at the Bayview. This program is for school age children who need care before and/or after school.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

FACES SF Infant Toddler Center located in Hayes Valley / Western Addition. The Infant Toddler Center provides childcare for low income families in the community.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

FACES SF's VVNAP is located in Visitacion Valley. This center provides workforce development, training, and employment services for adults in the community who are under- or unemployed.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Young adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Infants and toddlers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors

Related Program

Visitacion Valley Neighborhood Access Point

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since the merger of Florence Crittenton Services and the Whitney Young Child Development Center in 2011, FACES has established a sustainable organization with a culture of process improvement. But there are many more families we could be serving on their road to self-sufficiency as the wealth gap in our city continues to widen. We also know that in order to make a larger impact in our community we must first build our capacity for impact, as well as expand our influence and reach to work with more government, corporate and nonprofit partners.

Building our capacity for impact involves preparing to take advantage of strategic partnerships and potential social enterprise developments. Acquiring or expanding existing facilities is one way to increase the number of children and families we have the opportunity to empower. However, we recognize that no organization is an island in this city, and to that end we wish to collaborate with like-minded organizations who work both in our space, as well as in adjacent sectors. We want to be able to assist our families with any potential problems they may face whether directly, or through partner organizations. We are looking to embrace new ideas and opportunities that align with our core values and mission. This could include building out our existing facilities, and/or acquiring additional facilities – through purchase, collaboration, merger, etc. – all in order to directly serve more children, parents, and families.

To accomplish our ultimate goal, we must expand our influence and reach within the communities we serve, and beyond. We seek to infuse our Board of Directors with new members that vocally share our mission, increase our networking capability, and enhance our fundraising potential so that FACES SF becomes a major force in maintaining and celebrating our city’s economic, ethnic, and cultural diversity. Through powerful partnerships, continued sponsorship, and your help, we can ensure that every San Francisco family, and every child, has the opportunity to thrive regardless of their socioeconomic background.

Family and Child Empowerment Services - San Francisco (FACES SF) is a San Francisco based nonprofit organization that specializes in affordable, quality Early Childhood Education, full family educational and therapeutic services, and as workforce development. Our three programs seek to holistically empower critically underserved children and families within the city limits.

Our Child Development Program is designed to serve infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Our Early Childhood Education component focuses on preparing our youngest minds to excel when they begin school. We provide hands-on, age-appropriate learning activities as well as guide children in their social and emotional development so that they are fully prepared to enter the K-12 system on par with their peers. We also provide an after-school and summertime education program for students in Kindergarten through 6th grade.

Our Family Support Program is designed to maximize the success and happiness families experience in our education programs and within the home. We accomplish this through providing parent and caregiver workshops and counseling services. Our counselors also connect parents to other services they may require within the community.

Our Workforce Development Program is designed to ensure that every San Francisco resident has the tools, access, and opportunity to become economically self-sufficient in an increasingly difficult economic environment. We provide workforce training, resume construction and evaluation, and numerous opportunities for clients to connect with potential employers face to face. Our Workforce Program also provides case management services, and often remains involved with our clients as they progress in their careers.

FACES SF serves San Francisco families who have historically been critically underserved. Currently, the Federal poverty line for a family of 4 in the United States rests at $25,100. In San Francisco, the Department of Housing and Urban Development has set the total annual household income of $44,000 or less as “extremely low income” (ELI) for a family of four. In our Childhood Development Program, 41% of the families we enroll in our education programs are surviving beneath the poverty line, and over 80% of our families are living beneath the HUD benchmark for extremely low income.

In our 2017-18 school year, we enrolled 332 children across our three centers for early childhood education and K-6 afterschool academic support. Of these 350, 161 children and their families were also provided with much needed mental health and behavior support through our Family Support Program. In addition to these students, we also connected 400 children with quality childcare providers in our Family Childcare Network. 96% of our students are people of color, and approximately 65% of our students live in the Bayview-Hunters Point, Visitacion Valley, and Excelsior neighborhoods.

Over the same time period, our Workforce Development Program placed 228 hard-working adults in quality jobs as they strived to become economically self-sufficient. 88% of our workforce clients are people of color, and 50% of our clients are women. 68% of our newly employed neighbors live in San Francisco’s District 10 which includes the neighborhoods of Bayview Hunters Point, Potrero Hill, Dogpatch, and Visitacion Valley.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    FACES SF's programs serve: - children age 0 to 12 and their families - adults seeking employment services and employment opportunities

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

FACES SF
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FACES SF

Board of directors
as of 3/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Leon Mwotia

Apple

Term: 2021 -


Board co-chair

Harit Agroia

Alameda County DPH

Term: 2021 -

Rita Lee

Brouwer & Janachowski LLC

Leon Mwotia

Alexia DePottere-Smith

LiAnna Davis

Harit Agroia

Paul Segre

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/11/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.