GOLD2023

Community Action Agency of Butte County, Inc.

Helping People. Changing Lives.

aka CAA, CAA of Butte County, Butte County CAA   |   CHICO, CA   |  https://www.buttecaa.com/

Mission

At Butte County CAA we provide hope to people struggling with poverty to become more self-sustaining by meeting tangible needs in the areas of energy savings, affordable food, and housing. Our mission is to serve as a catalyst to reduce poverty and its symptoms through: Providing quality services Developing resources Collaborating with others Advocating on behalf of the economically & socially disadvantaged Empowering individuals Improving the conditions in which people live, learn and work We envision communities whose members feel secure and are self-sufficient.

Ruling year info

1967

Chief Executive Officer

Timothy Hawkins

Main address

PO BOX 6369

CHICO, CA 95927 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-1640546

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The causes and conditions of poverty in our service aAt Butte County CAA we provide hope to people struggling with poverty to become more self-sustaining by meeting tangible needs in the areas of energy savings, affordable food, and housing. Our mission is to serve as a catalyst to reduce poverty and its symptoms through: Providing quality services Developing resources Collaborating with others Advocating on behalf of the economically & socially disadvantaged Empowering individuals Improving the conditions in which people live, learn and work We envision communities whose members feel secure and are self-sufficient.rea is the problem that the CAA was created to address.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Energy & Environmental Services

Weatherization Assistance:
Weather-stripping
Low-flow showerheads and sink aerators
Thermostatic shower valves
Attic insulation
Replacement of standard light bulbs and fixtures with energy efficient versions
Energy Education: information to help you learn more ways to reduce your monthly energy bill
Utility Assistance: Qualified households may receive assistance in paying their utility costs. This may include electric, natural gas, propane, heating oil, cord wood or wood pellets. There are specific emergency services for clients who have received shut-off notices from their utility provider.

Population(s) Served

The Esplanade House includes a total of 60 apartments. 34 are dedicated to the Phase 1 part of the program for homeless families. Additionally there are 26 apartments for our Phase 2 residents who are in the process of graduating from the program. To benefit the resident children, there is an on site Child Development Center and playground. The facility also includes an administration building and donations area.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Older adults
Children and youth
Family relationships
Economically disadvantaged people

The CAA’s North State Food Bank collects and distributes food throughout the service region encompassing Butte, Glenn, Colusa, Plumas, Sierra and Tehama counties. With the help of our extensive network of partners, the North State Food Bank offers multiple programs to help low income families get the food and nutrition they need each month. Below is an outline of the programs that we run with our incredible team of staff and volunteers.
Hunger: The Threat Is Real In Butte County
Butte County is rich in natural beauty, recreation, education and small industry, but is economically depressed. The poverty rate in Butte County from 2009-2013 was 20.4% with a much higher rate in Oroville (38.6%) than Chico (25.9%) or Paradise (15.4%). While incomes have improved for many, a large and growing percentage of the population has not experienced income gains sufficient to escape poverty. Unemployment is typically higher than the State average, which was 15.9% in the same time period.
So with this poverty level there are families in our community who are going hungry every day, because their income isn’t high enough to allow them to purchase enough food. Or in some cases, they are undernourished because they can’t afford the right kind of food, like protein and fresh produce, and instead settle for inexpensive food that lacks nutrients.
What Is “Food Insecurity”
The problem of hunger isn’t simple, but it is solvable. Food insecurity is a helpful way for us to define where and how our neighbors struggle to afford food.
The USDA defines food insecurity as a state in which “consistent access to adequate food is limited by a lack of money and other resources at times during the year.”
In short, people who are describing food insecurity say they are “struggling to avoid hunger,” “hungry, or at risk of hunger,” and “hungry, or faced by the threat of hunger.”
A FEW STATISTICS FOR YOU TO PONDER:
39,960 (18.03%) of Butte County residents and 27.25% ( more than 1 in 4) of all children in the County experienced food insecurity at some point during the last year according to estimates from Feeding America.
18,535 (59.7%) of public school students in Butte County are eligible for free/reduced school meals according to the National Center for Education and Statistics.
1 in 5 Northern California residents struggle with hunger related issues and the majority of these households have at least one adult that works full-time.

Commodity Distributions

A variety of food commodities from the US Department of Agriculture, Emergency Food Assistance Program are distributed at 53 sites for income eligible families and individuals throughout Butte, Glenn, Colusa, Plumas and Sierra counties. With the help of over 150 dedicated volunteers, we were able to distribute 54,217 food boxes in 2017, affecting nearly 3000 households monthly.
To see a list of upcoming distribution sites see our Commodity (TEFAP) Distribution Schedule 2020 here. To find out if you are eligible from an income perspective, see our 2019/2020 Income Guidelines.
Note: not all food products are distributed at each scheduled site.

Tailgate Distributions
From late Spring through early Fall, we host food distributions in various locations throughout our service area. The food distributed is fresh produce and other perishable items that are available by season. These tailgate distribution events also often include information booths from various resource agencies, such as Cal Fresh, Public Health and Nutrition Education. Those receiving food boxes are asked to self-certify their low-income status. We directly distribute produce to approximately 300 families at each of these events.
The 2020 Tailgate distribution schedule, which begins in June, is downloadable here: Tailgate 2020 Calendar

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Young adults
Children and youth
Family relationships
Economically disadvantaged people
Young adults
Children and youth
Family relationships
Adults

Tax Preparation Assistance (VITA): In collaboration with several community partners, including CSU Chico, CAA provides tax preparation assistance to hundreds of people each year, under an IRS-guided service known as VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance). The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program offers free tax help to people who generally make $53,000 or less, persons with disabilities, the elderly and limited English speaking taxpayers who need assistance in preparing their own tax returns. We help over 1200 families annually to file accurate tax returns, putting needed money back into their budget and benefitting our local community.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with disabilities
Seniors
People with disabilities

The complex was constructed for families and single individuals who are low-income and need affordable rents to help them achieve self-sufficiency. Seven units are restricted for extremely low income households (earning less than 30% of Area Median Income), forty-two units are set aside for low income households (earning less than 60% of Area Median Income), and there is one manager’s unit. All units are energy-efficient, and the project includes a children’s playground, bbq/picnic area, a community room with a kitchen, a computer lab, laundry facilities, bike parking, and a variety of educational classes and support groups which meet in the community room. The project provides 5 one-bedroom units, 19 two-bedroom units, 26 three-bedroom units, including 4 ADA-accessible units and 2 units for persons with sensory impairments.
On-site, residential management is provided through Community Housing Improvement Program (CHIP).

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Parents
Older adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Parents
Older adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Parents
Older adults

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To promote economic security of low-income residents.

Energy, Shelter, Housing, Food Support, Tax-Assistance

50+ years experience; multiple revenue resources; multiple community partner and volunteer resources.

We have Weatherized over 30,000 homes; We have Provided food to over 10,000 families; and we have Graduated over 600 families to permanent housing.

Financials

Community Action Agency of Butte County, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Community Action Agency of Butte County, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 06/06/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

LT. John Kuhn

John Kuhn

Butte County Sheriff

Cesar Alfaro

Bank Manager, Golden 1

Dee Hoffman Wills

Administration

Kathy Hafer

Business Owner

Stephanie Powell

Marketing, Klean Kanteen

Carl Wilkinson

Bank Manager

Sheldy Chase

Business Owner, HR

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/6/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data