NORTH MARIN COMMUNITY SERVICES

Where our Community Connects

aka NMCS   |   NOVATO, CA   |  https://www.northmarincs.org

Mission

Mission: We empower youth, adults and families in our diverse community to achieve well-being, growth and success. Vision: A strong community with opportunities for all.

Notes from the nonprofit

North Marin Community Services (NMCS) is a leader in the field of human services and youth development. NMCS evolved as a 501(c)(3) on January 1, 2018 through a merger between the Novato Youth Center and Novato Human Needs Center (tax ID# 94-1735064). As a result, now stronger and better positioned to serve Marin County, NMCS provides trauma informed, integrated and culturally appropriate services annually to 11,000 people in need. Our person-centered approach to care offers individuals a chance to achieve a better quality of life.

Ruling year info

1972

Chief Executive Officer

Mrs. Cheryl Paddack

Main address

680 WILSON AVENUE

NOVATO, CA 94947 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Novato Youth Center

Novato Human Needs Center

EIN

94-1735064

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2020 and 2019.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Health and Wellness Programs

Community and School based Counseling, Adolescent Health Education/Peer Health Promotion, Novato Teen Clinic, Sports Leagues

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Community Services and Support (case management, rental assistance, food pantry, holiday share, financial literacy), Amigos de la Familia, Thriving Families Initiative, Promotores Program, Developmental Playgroup

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Immigrants and migrants

Early Care and Education, School Age afterschool and summer youth enrichment programs

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Our Latinx Services include:
• Promotores Program & Ser Fuerte Campaign: Community Health Advocates from 8 different Latin American countries who speak English, Spanish, Mayan and Quiché provide outreach, education and 1:1 emotional support related to Substance Use/ Mental Health Prevention and Early Intervention
• Newcomer Groups & Student Support
• Workshops & ELAC Presentations: underage drinking and marijuana use; mental health

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

Accreditations

Marin Quality Counts Consortia - Mastering High Quality Standards, Early Child Development Program 2021

Awards

Heart of Marin Achievement in Nonprofit Excellence Award 2021

Center for Volunteer and Nonprofit Leadership

Best Places to Work 2021

North Bay Business Journal

Look Who’s Getting It Done Award 2021

District 5 Supervisor Judy Arnold

Jefferson Silver Award to CEO Cheryl Paddack 2021

KPIX and Multiplying Good

Latino Business Leadership Award to Director of Latinx Services, Berta Campos-Anicetti 2021

North Bay Business Journal

Community Pandemic Assistance Award to Lead Food Pantry Volunteer, Cindy Stern 2021

Town of Novato

Outstanding Child Abuse Prevention Award 2020

The Marin Child Abuse Prevention Council

CFO Recognition Award to CFO Vanshika Nachnani 2019

North Bay Business Journal

Affiliations & memberships

Soroptimist International 2005

Chamber of Commerce 1988

United Way Member Agency 1983

Lead to Novato's Emergency Response Team 2021

Rotary Club of Ignacio Member 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Visits to our Novato Teen Clinic for youth ages 12-21 accessing reproductive and behavioral healthcare.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people, Adolescents

Related Program

Health and Wellness Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Free and confidential Teen Clinic visits

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people, Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Health and Wellness Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, People of Latin American descent

Related Program

Child Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Child Development: Early Childhood Education, School Age afterschool and summer enrichment for elementary and middle schoolers, parent/guardian workshops

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve a mix of low-income families, elders, service workers, single parents, immigrants, and children facing multiple challenges in Novato and North Marin. The majority of those we serve are from extremely and very low-income families. As the most comprehensive provider of safety-net services in North Marin, we have experienced and continue to experience a dramatic increase in demand for services by low-income households, Latinx and other individuals of color. Programs such as our emergency rental assistance program, weekly food pantry, mental health services for youth and families, and on-site childcare and educational support to at-risk youth provide a safety net for vulnerable people in our community, and advance the well-being of those we serve.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email, Testimonials,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Parents responded to the most recent parent survey that they wanted to see more of what children are doing in the classroom, such as a virtual open house. In response, we created a Child Development newsletter that highlights each classroom, skills the children are working on, projects they are doing, etc. In an effort to elevate participant voices, provide space for personal experiences to be heard and let others in need know about our available services, we created an optional feedback section in our bilingual Mental Health and Wellness feedback form where participants can share their stories. We share some of those stories with donors (with permission from our program participants) and modify identifiable personal information when requested.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    When we are able to make changes to our program based on feedback, we support our participants’ needs better. Our Promotores Program exemplifies this well. NMCS runs the only Promotores Program in Marin. Through regular meetings with our 21 Promotores (trained community health volunteers) NMCS is informed about the issues that are most pressing in the Latinx community. This information drives program initiatives and goals. Additionally, in our Mental Health and Wellness programs, intentionally asking for feedback is an active practice for our clinicians. Ongoing feedback can allow clients to be open about what’s happening for them, help them make clinical decisions, and show where we need to improve and empower them in the process.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

NORTH MARIN COMMUNITY SERVICES
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

NORTH MARIN COMMUNITY SERVICES

Board of directors
as of 04/27/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rick van Adelsberg

Retired Principal/Educator

Term: 2021 -

Karen Dillon Gifford

Marketing & Client Relations Professional

Jim Duckworth

Real Estate Investor & Asset Manager

Kate Shilvock

Nonprofit Professional

Karen Robertson Strain

Front Porch Realty Group

Rick van Adelsberg

Retired Principal/Educator

Uday Wagle

Retired Chemical Engineer

Jim Correa

Novato Police Department

Cathy Janigian

Financial Marketing Communication Profession

Alberto Lopez

W. Bradley Electric

Isaac Munene

Realtor, Coldwell Banker

Nikki Collins

Marin Community Foundation

Rafelina Maglio

Bank of Marin

Cris Jones

Tenant Relations Manager, Volunteer Management Consultant

Aileen McGoldrick

Autodesk

Karen Poksay

Ultragenyx Pharmaceutical

Alejandro Menacho Molina

High School Student

Rosa Velasquez

High School Student

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/27/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.