West Valley Community Services of Santa Clara County, Inc.

Join us in the fight against hunger, homelessness

aka West Valley Community Services, Inc. (WVCS)   |   CUPERTINO, CA   |  www.wvcommunityservices.org

Mission

The mission of West Valley Community Services (WVCS) is to unite the community to fight hunger and homelessness.

The mission is guided by our vision of a community where every person has food on their table and every person has a roof over their head.

Ruling year info

1976

Executive Director

Josh Selo

Main address

10104 VISTA DRIVE

CUPERTINO, CA 95014-2253 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Cupertino Community Services

EIN

94-2211685

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The mission of West Valley Community services is to "Unite the community to fight hunger and homelessness". We are a 501c3 registered and incorporated nonprofit and with the help of the local community, we provide food and housing resources to our low-income families in the west valley region. With the rising housing costs in the bay area, the community here is facing a higher and higher cost of living and are unable to meet their day to day basic needs in sustaining themselves and their families. As a result, we are seeing an increase in hunger and homelessness. More and more families are unable to afford housing and are unable to afford food.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Programs and Services for Health

Health - Provides Food, Clothing, & Nutrition ServicesWVCS works to alleviate hunger by distributing more than 250,000 pounds of food each year to more than 4,000 individuals and families. WVCS receives donations of more than 400,000 pounds of food from Second Harvest Food Bank, local grocery stores and the community. The Food Pantry is staffed primarily by volunteers who bag and distribute more than $600,000 worth of food to more than 2,000 families every year. Every week, income eligible households have access to the WVCS Food Pantry at two locations in Cupertino and Los Gatos. Our Community Access to Resources and Education (CARE) project is available to provide access to valuable health and nutrition resources during times of need. WVCS provides SNAP Food Stamps eligibility pre-screening, cooking on a budget classes, one-on-one nutrition consultation and other services.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Home - Provides Shelter & Housing AssistanceThe Transitional Housing Program provides supportive services and stable housing to 12 homeless men and 6 single mothers with a child. Tenants also receive budget coaching, case management and assistance to secure permanent housing. Our Below Market Rate Housing (BMR) Program places over 200 low-income households into affordable rental housing units in Cupertino. The BMR program administers the affordable housing sales program for the City of Cupertino, targeting moderate and median income families. WVCS’ also owns and operate its Vista Village Apartment Complex, permanent housing for low-income households.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Heart - Provides Family Support & Emergency Assistance

Unexpected situations have the potential to cause deep financial instability. WVCS provides one-time Emergency Financial Assistance to prevent evictions, utility cutoffs, transportation needs, clothing vouchers and other basic needs. Case managers work closely with families and individuals to determine qualifications, needs and capability to stabilize. The goal is to stabilize individuals and families during times of trouble and help them return to self-sufficiency. Ongoing financial workshops are offered free of charge and provide valuable information on budgeting, credit, and more. In addition, counseling services and legal consultation are provided from qualified volunteer specialists and partner agencies.

 

WVCS also coordinates special programs that provide the distribution of Thanksgiving, spring, and holiday food baskets, back-to-school backpacks, children’s shopping sprees, as well as organize an “Adopt-a-Family” program during December in collaboration with various faith-based and community-based organizations. Special Programs include summer camp, back-to-school shopping, backpack distribution, holiday food baskets, Adopt-a-family, etc.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of men, women, and children who received critical help from WVCS

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Families

Related Program

Programs and Services for Home

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Services provided include food pantry and Mobile Food Pantry access, emergency financial support for one-time rent/deposit/mortgage/utility needs, homeless and affordable housing support, and more.

Number of people who came to WVCS for the first time for help

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Unemployed people

Related Program

Programs and Services for Heart

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Includes those living in WVCS' service area who were able to access assistance programs for the first time.

Number of students, seniors, and families who were served on the Mobile Food Pantry

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Economically disadvantaged people, Students

Related Program

Programs and Services for Health

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

West Valley Community Services offers a Mobile Food Pantry to clients living in Los Gatos, Saratoga, and West San Jose with barriers to transportation. This is in addition to its on-site food pantry.

Number of people who received clothing, toys, food, and household items at Gift of Hope

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Programs and Services for Heart

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Gifts of Hope is WVCS' annual holiday event for homeless and low-income families (Special Program). Attendees are gifted with needed items, including jackets, microwaves, and toys for their children.

Number of children in K-12th grade who received clothing, shoes, and backpacks

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Students

Related Program

Programs and Services for Heart

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

At WVCS' annual Back-To-School Program (Special Programs), K-12th grade students receive a backpack full of school supplies and new clothes for the upcoming academic year.

Number of families who received Thanksgiving meal baskets

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Families, Unemployed people

Related Program

Programs and Services for Heart

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

At the Thanksgiving Basket Event (Special Programs), WVCS distributes baskets filled with items to make a thanksgiving meal (including a turkey, chicken, or vegetarian option) to low-income families.

Amount that WVCS volunteers helped clients file for in tax returns ($)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, People with disabilities

Related Program

Programs and Services for Heart

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Program (Special Programs) offers free tax help to low-income, limited-English, and disabled taxpayers. 81, 82, and 78 annual participants, respectively.

Amount of emergency assistance distributed to help prevent homelessness or to re-house homeless families ($)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Unemployed people

Related Program

Programs and Services for Home

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Emergency financial aid is part of WVCS' 3-part plan to: 1) Prevent imminent evictions, 2) Help clients remain housed/house un-housed clients, and 3) Work with clients to develop long-term stability.

Number of individuals who received food from the food pantry and the Mobile Food Pantry

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Unemployed people

Related Program

Programs and Services for Health

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

WVCS operates an on-site food pantry five days a week. Additionally, it now enables clients with barriers to transportation to access food aid through the Mobile Food Pantry (est. Oct. 2016).

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goal of the organization is to support low-income families in the community with the help of volunteers and our community members. Our goal is to keep people housed and fed so that their basic needs are met. There 625 community volunteers who work with us to make this possible.

We support low-income families by providing them with free of cost fresh nutritious produce, milk dairy, meats, grains, pulses, baby food, toiletries, cleaning supplies and much much more to sustain and support people in need. With the savings in the monthly food costs, the families are able to pay rent, remain housed and meet that gap so they can balance their other costs and bills.

We support families with free food, housing resources, case management, financial coaching, tax filling support, emergency funding, clothing vouchers, exercise plus nutrition classes, children's camps, back to school needs and gifts during holidays so that they experience normal living.

Keeping in line with our goal of involving community members to support the community in need, we have 625 community volunteers who work with us to make this possible.

We source and glean excess foods from Farmer's markets, grocery partners and Second Harvest to serve the hungry. All these foods are gleaned, sorted and shelved by our volunteers, all 5 working days of the week. We serve our clients with dignity and respect.

We have seen a 35% growth in the year over year need and we have been able to meet those needs with the help of donations, community outreach, and volunteer engagement.

The organization is in its 45 years of existence. It was started by 3 nurses and served 12 people on its first day. From there we have come to serve 4000 (unique- not counting all the visits that the same client makes to receive our services week over week).

We have come to prove the viability and the need in the community over these 45 years. As we strive to become better and better, we know that the power of unity and the community is a synergy beyond definition.

We are powered by 20 staff, 19 board members and more than 600 volunteers. We are growing and keeping up with the needs of the community

Our growth has been exponential. We work in partnership with corporations, faith-based organizations, foundations, the County and the community. We are looking to deepen and expand these partnerships.

We have grown from a small pantry to a huge RV that takes food around to various communities in the area. Serving the seniors who are not able to move or do not have transportation, to serving students in various colleges who are homeless and facing hunger ( yes, it is a real issue in our community).

We supply food to De Anza college and soon opening a food pantry Hub in San Jose in an underserved school. We are entering an exploring phase for capacity building and capital campaign so we are able to our match the needs and serve additional people in need.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Those experiencing hunger and homelessness within the West Valley community.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    After a client had problems with reaching their case manager, we created a new Slack system to triage clients and case managers so that constant communication could be better supported.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Through our focus groups' and advisory committee's actions, we are able to provide a voice and power to our clients. Any new programs or activities we implement, we do so with a mindset of empowering the clients.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

West Valley Community Services of Santa Clara County, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

West Valley Community Services of Santa Clara County, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jeanne Bradford

Google

Nancy Harper

Community Volunteer

Rich Parker

Community Volunteer

Seema Kumar

Community Volunteer

Monica Chandra

Consultant

Jeanne Bradford

Consultant

Joan Cummings

Community Volunteer

Leslie Mains

School Supervisor

Jennifer Gargano

Community Volunteer

Melissa Berkowitz

Community Volunteer

Allan Greenstein

Community Volunteer

Temnee Wright

Community Volunteer

Jennifer Merlin

Consultant

Nagesh Kanumury

Informatica

Sandra Sotoudeh

Community Volunteer

Angelia Lim -Sampson

community Volunteer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/04/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/04/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.