FOOD BANK CONTRA COSTA AND SOLANO

Ending hunger together

aka FBCCS   |   Concord, CA   |  http://www.foodbankccs.org

Mission

Leading the fight to end hunger, in partnership with our community and in service of our neighbors in need.

Notes from the nonprofit

Thank you for looking into the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

Ruling year info

1977

President and CEO

Joel Sjostrom

Main address

4010 Nelson Ave

Concord, CA 94520 USA

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Formerly known as

Contra Costa Food Bank

Food Coalition

Solano Food Bank

EIN

94-2418054

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Produce Program

Refrigerated trucks have been customized for the exclusive purpose of distributing fresh produce to communities in need. Clients will be able to pick-up an average of 20 pounds of produce, twice per month.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Clients referred by the Contra Costa County Health Department receive supplemental food twice a month.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Food for children whose families cannot afford to keep enough food on the table. Every week, the Food Bank distributes 3-5 pounds of fresh produce per child through after-school programs in low-income schools.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Individuals receive fresh produce, bread, and USDA commodities every month at one of 31 sites.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Children, ages 4 to 6, receive free food every month at one of nine sites.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Infants and toddlers

Shelf-stable food items are available at high schools and middle schools where 50% or more of the students receive free or reduced price lunch.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adolescents

Low-income senior citizens receive free groceries twice a month.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

Fresh produce and bread are distributed to low-income housing complexes twice a month.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

Where we work

Awards

Food Safety 2016

American Institute of Baking

2021 Advocacy Honor Roll 2021

Food Bank News

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Low-income people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Average number of individuals per month accessing the Food Bank's services in Contra Costa and Solano counties

Number of pounds distributed throughout Contra Costa and Solano counties

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Low-income people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goals of the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano are best expressed in our guiding statements:

Mission:
Leading the fight to end hunger, in partnership with our community and in service of our neighbors in need.

Vision:
Through the activities of the Food Bank and its member agencies, all hungry people in Contra Costa and Solano counties will receive at least one nutritious meal every day.

When someone is hungry, they can always turn to the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano. We provide food assistance to children in poverty, low-income seniors, homeless people, families in crisis, the chronically ill, the disabled, and working poor families. The Food Bank also raises community awareness of hunger through nutrition education and anti-hunger advocacy. We engage in robust CalFresh (SNAP) outreach to connect people with this underutilized food resource.

In addition to supporting over 250 partner agencies (churches, soup kitchens, shelters, etc), the Food Bank runs six direct service programs: Senior Food Program (age 55 and over), Extra Helpings program (the chronically ill), Farm 2 Kids (fresh produce at K-12 schools), School Pantry Program (shelf-stable food items at K-12 schools and colleges), Mobile Food Pharmacy (healthy shelf-stable food and fresh produce in partnership with Solano Public Health), and Community Produce Program (fresh produce in low-income neighborhoods.)

We have been serving over 250,000 people per month and distributed over 40 million pounds of food last year through our six direct service programs and 250 partner agencies. .

The Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano is a stable and efficient organization committed to ending hunger in our service area. We were established in 1975 and since then, have grown from two employees to 100+. With the help of over 6,000 volunteers, we have been serving over 250,000 people per month and distributed over 40 million pounds of food last year. Our combined administrative and fundraising expenses are less than 3% of total revenue.

The Food Bank has clear title to our headquarters building in Concord, including a 30,000 square foot warehouse with two drive-in coolers and a walk-in freezer – powered largely by 300 solar panels on the roof. In the past year we acquired a new, larger warehouse in Fairfield which has expanded our ability to serve our community. We own a fleet of 15 vehicles, ranging in size from hybrid passenger cars to tractor-trailer rigs.

We are still serving nearly 50% more individuals than we were before the start of the pandemic. In the past year and a half, we have made a number of investments in critical infrastructure including additional storage and refrigeration space as well as new trucks and equipment to move more food. We have built out our operations team, invested in new technology, acquired a new, larger warehouse in Fairfield, and implemented increased safety and sanitation practices that will benefit our entire service area for years to come. Each of these investments was crucial to our ability to meet the increased need in our community. However, two years into the pandemic, we continue to struggle with supply chain disruptions, rising prices, and staffing challenges. While external factors continue to put strain on our staff and resources, the Food Bank is prepared to continue responding to increased demand and ensure none of our neighbors is without food for as long as the economic effects of the crisis linger. Looking ahead, our organization has identified three focus areas on its recently approved strategic plan: nutritious food, our partner agencies, and data.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our clients are residents of Contra Costa and Solano counties, California. The Food Bank has over 200 direct distribution sites and supplies food to approximately 250 agencies across both counties. Richmond, Vallejo, Pittsburg/Bay Point, Fairfield and Concord all have high concentrations of distribution sites. We provide food to anyone who is hungry (including children, seniors, homeless people, families in crisis, people with health issues, the disabled, and working poor families) and qualifies for the age/income requirements for the specific program. Food Bank distributions target areas with high food insecurity, which are oftentimes communities of color.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have been making adjustments to the locations of new programming, as well as to food choices offered at distributions.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Feedback helps inform future decisions about special populations that may need additional resources, the specific or unique resources they need, how to better serve them, and what strategic partnerships we can build to create sustainable, ongoing service.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

FOOD BANK CONTRA COSTA AND SOLANO
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FOOD BANK CONTRA COSTA AND SOLANO

Board of directors
as of 03/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Laura Moran

Retired, Global Client Delivery, Prophet

Term: 2020 -

Tom Chowaniec

Retired, Regional Manager-General Mills

Paul Gabbard

Retired, Shell Oil Products US

Rich Golinski

Principal & Chief Investment Officer, Bingham, Osborn & Scarborough, LLC

Jim Gray

Retired, Visa, Inc.

Mark Gundacker

Chief People Officer and Chief of Staff, Metromile

Melissa Jones

Executive Vice President, Chief HR Officer, CSAA Insurance Group

David Le

Refinery Controller, Business Services, Valero Benicia Refinery

Marc Lewis

Attorney, Partner/Co-Founder, Lewis & Llewellyn LLP

Teresa Makarewicz

Retired, Manager CA Business Coordination, Shell Oil Products US

Laura Moran

Retired, Global Client Delivery, Prophet

Bruce Phelps

Consultant, BiotecH Pro Consulting

Tanya Powell

Chief Financial Officer, S&S Supplies and Solutions

Glenn Smith

Vice President, Retail, Quotient Technologies, Inc.

Jill Steele

Partner, Prophet

Tracy Tomkovicz

CEO/Owner, S&S Supplies and Solutions

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.