Next Door Solutions to Domestic Violence

Empowering survivors to achieve safety, stability, and self-sufficiency.

aka Next Door Solutions   |   San Jose, CA   |  www.nextdoorsolutions.org

Mission

Next Door Solutions to Domestic Violence’s (NDS) mission is to end domestic violence in the moment and for all time – creating paths for survivors from crisis to safety, stability, and self-reliance. Our goal is to decrease the number of people in Santa Clara County who will experience intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetime.

Ruling year info

1977

Executive Director

Ms. Esther Pearlez-Dieckmann

Main address

234 East Gish Road Suite 200

San Jose, CA 95112 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-2420708

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Intimate partner violence, perpetuated by individuals and unaddressed in systems and community, is gender-based violence and is a human rights issue. It is prevalent in every community – and, particularly for women, girls, and LGBTQAIP, it limits their opportunities, full participation, and advancement in society. Survivors comprise an isolated and extremely underserved population in need of a distinctive approach to providing support and services that address their unique needs. Times of economic uncertainty, civil unrest, and disaster are linked to a myriad of risk factors for increased violence against intimate partners. The influence of abuse can persist long after violence has stopped, both for the person experiencing the violence, and for children in the form of depression, anxiety, poor school or work performance, and negative health outcomes. There is a need to address underlying unhealthy norms that allow IPV to flourish and impact the health and well-being of families.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community & Systems Advocacy

Advocates provide walk-in crisis intervention counseling, legal advocacy and assistance with filing restraining orders, information on the courts and how they work and on VAWA/UVISAs, access to on-site no-cost attorneys (limited scope representation), Peaceful Contact workshops, assistance with identifying and accessing other internal and external resources, client assistance (immediate need financial assistance, such as utility disconnection prevention), and hoteling (when the Shelter is full or not appropriate placement for client, e.g. male survivor).

Services are free of charge and at-will. Advocates are trained/certified DV Peer Counselors (State of California Evidence Code: Section 1037-1037.8) – a first step in establishing confidentiality; with additional training in Survivor-Defined Advocacy, Trauma Informed Care, Client-Centered Case Management, Motivational Interviewing, Supporting LGBTQAIP Survivors, and Cultural Responsiveness, and restraining orders/filing, court systems; and skills in advocacy, resource identification, and referrals. NDS’ service model is based on the Survivor-Defined Advocacy model that builds a partnership between the Advocate and client, who ultimately defines the advocacy and help they need. Advocates are bilingual-bicultural English/Spanish and additional language assistance is through a third-party contractor. Male survivors have access to all NDS services/programs.

• 85% of clients engaged in legal advocacy services have a greater understanding of their legal rights and the legal process

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Shelter Next Door provides a safe, home-like environment for female victims of intimate partner violence and their children who are escaping or have been displaced by abuse. It is open/staffed 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Victims who have been displaced or have fled their home receive a safe and supportive environment with services that help reduce their, and their children’s, feelings of isolation, depression and anxiety. Residents receive safe respite from potentially life-threatening abuse, food, personal care products, and same day assistance obtaining necessary medications. Residents receive risk assessment and safety planning from themselves and any children; needs assessment and case management, assistance with housing searches and identification of resources, financial literacy screening, and assistance with keeping children enrolled in school, age-appropriate activities, and homework assistance. Male survivors, and any of their children, are provided safe shelter via hoteling, with services provided by a mobile Advocate or virtually (phone, email, video chat).

The 24/7 Hotline provides crisis counseling, risk assessment and safely planning, and information and referrals.

Shelter and Hotline staff are bilingual English/Spanish, and have access to a third party contractor that can provide assistance with additional language needs. All staff are trained and certified Domestic Violence Peer Counselors (California Evidence Code Section §1037.2), with additional training in Survivor-Defined Advocacy, Trauma Informed Care, Client-Centered Intensive Case Management, Motivational Interviewing, Cultural Responsiveness, and restraining orders/filing, court systems; and skills in advocacy, resource identification, and referrals. NDS’ service model is based on the Survivor-Defined Advocacy model that builds a partnership between the Advocate and client, who ultimately defines the advocacy and help they need.

• 90% of clients engaged in shelter services achieve one or more needs identified on the Needs Assessment by the time of discharge

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

• Therapeutic counseling for survivors, their children, and/or as a family; to address the emotional and psychological trauma of children and teens due to expose to IPV.

• Youth & Family Advocate –provides individual support, peer-counseling, and appropriate learning to children, youth, and families - providing emotional and practical support to the children/youth and their parent. The YFA provides case management services; assists families with school related requests and supplies; assists the parenting survivors with parenting questions, resources, and provide one to one educational parenting sessions as appropriate; and provides advocacy, information and referrals, and crisis intervention services as needed.

• Kids Club positive play for youth, provides engaging individual and group activities in a safe, inviting, and consistent environment. Facilitators use a variety of educational resources, i.e. A Window Between Worlds curriculum which is evidenced-based and assists youth, through art, in reducing overwhelming emotions associated with emotional trauma.

• Parent and Child Healing After Violence - a parenting workshop presented over six 2-hour group sessions - to teach, support, and empower parents in addressing the impact to their children by exposure to violence by providing the parent (survivor) with practical skills based on proven principles; provided by a trained Family Wellness instructor with extensive experience in dealing with families affected by IPV; offered in English and in Spanish and participants are provided handouts and material for the class.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Support Groups are available in English and Spanish and include groups male survivors, and LGBTQAIP, and teens. Support Groups provide a larger circle of support; victims become survivors as they reduce isolation and increase connections to others by talking with their peers about the abuse – and in understanding that the abuse is not their fault. Clients will report they are able to identify at least one person in their family or community who supports them; and are better able to manage stress when it occurs.

Services are free of charge and at-will. Advocates are trained/certified DV Peer Counselors (State of California Evidence Code: Section 1037-1037.8) - establishing confidentiality; with additional training in Survivor-Defined Advocacy, Trauma Informed Care, Client-Centered Case Management, Motivational Interviewing, and Cultural Responsiveness. Advocates are bilingual-bicultural English/Spanish and additional language assistance is through a third-party contractor.

• 85% of clients engaged in support groups are better able to manage stress with it occurs

Population(s) Served
Adults

Self-Sufficiency Case Management is based on the Eight Domains of Self-Sufficiency framework, focusing on the life domains of Food, Income, Housing, Employment, Education, Healthcare, Wellness, and Intimate Partner Violence (abuse/safety). Workshops are available on financial literacy, computer skills, GED, and ESL. Case Management services help survivors gain/regain stability and self-reliance during and after abuse, and is incorporated into other Next Door Solutions core service. Clients focusing on employment can meet and work towards their goals with the Employment specialist.

Advocates work with clients in incrementally overcoming barriers impacting self-sufficiency gains; setting goals and addressing barriers to achieving those goals. Working together, they identify resources (i.e., housing, child care) that will support stated goals. Mutually agreed upon meetings are established to review plans and monitor progress, address barriers hampering gains, identify additional resources, and make goal adjustments. Workshops increase client’s knowledge and skills in areas of finance, education and career. The program goal is for the client to need less assistance overtime as they gain the skills and resources to self-advocate.

Advocates/Case Managers are bilingual English/Spanish and Domestic Violence Peer Counselor trained/certified (State of California Evidence Code: Section 1037-1037.8).

• 75% of clients engaged in self-sufficiency case management are able to maintain or increase their level of self-sufficiency

Population(s) Served
Adults

Through Domestic Violence Housing First services, adult survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) receive comprehensive case management and other support services to assist them, and their families, in increasing access to and retention of safe permanent housing. Support services tailored to the client’s needs help eliminate “lack of safe housing” as a barrier to leaving an abusive relationship; and assist those at risk of homelessness due to their IPV situation in remaining housed. Services include one-on-one and mobile advocacy and targeted case management services, including short-term financial assistance, to assist the client in achieving long-term goals, with a primary focus on reducing/eliminating homelessness and/or barriers to obtaining/maintaining permanent housing; and support service that address other needs impacting housing stability.

On average, after one year from exiting the program, 93% of clients remained housed.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Families

As part of NDS’ Theory of Change, the agency is advancing promising practices and strategies in addressing systemic issues that perpetuate domestic abuse, and in changing community norms through collaborative work and three key prevention initiatives:
1). Intimate Partner Violence and Healthcare Initiative –
• Outreach and education of DV’s impact on health and well-being, with increased focus on underserved communities, including recruitment and training of volunteers as Promotores and as Peacemakers. Through collaboration with Stanford School of Medicine, and engagement from NDS’ survivor volunteer group, El Comité, NAS has developed a Promotores “train the trainer” curriculum and conducts community trainings and mini-conferences. There is growing awareness and need in the healthcare sector to effectively identify and refer individuals living with IPV.
• Promoting the practice of providing universal education to all patients who come to healthcare providers/clinics, beyond just screening for disclosure; and providing information and trainings on CUES (Confidentiality; Universal Education and Empowerment; and Support) for healthcare practitioners in the clinical setting. NDS continues to engage both community health clinics and major healthcare systems (Kaiser, SCC Health and Hospital System, and Stanford Medical Center) in training and technical assistance.
• Stanford School of Medicine collaborative initiatives:
a). Health Access and Education Programming for IPV Survivors and Their Families: A Community-Based Initiative partnership with Stanford School of Medicine which provided survivors access to a series of workshops on various health topics such as Parent-Teen Communications, Healthy Relationships, Partnering with Your Healthcare Provider, and Reading with Your children. It was one of the first (documented) health education curricula designed and evaluated by DV survivors.
b). “Ask a Pediatrician” seminars presented for NDS clients; on-going. And brief “DV 101” trainings by NDS to the pediatricians
c). Community-Based Needs Assessment of Parents and Children as Survivors of IPV: to assess survivors’ perception of effects of DV on children, to describe survivors’ experience with communicating about DV with children, and identify desired support services. Information from this study is informing NDS on the development of new and expanded children’s aligned services

2). Men, Boys, & Gender-Based Violence Initiative: a Community-Based Prevention Initiative. NDS has identified three distinct groups of men in our work that we must consider in order to effectively reduce domestic/intimate partner violence: Men as Survivors; Men as Perpetrators; and Men as Allies.
a). Men as Survivors: a weekly support group for male survivors
b). Men as Allies - “Coaching Boys Into Men”, a violence prevention program from Futures Without Violence, leveraging coach and young school athletes’ relationships, focusing on respect for themselves and others - particularly women and girls. Feedback showed the need for this type of programming, as well as need for programming for female student athletes; NDS has added the Athletes As Leaders component. Surveys showed that youth increased their understanding of a healthy relationships and after the training are more likely to intervene if they see abusive behavior among their peers. NDS also conducts virtual youth symposiums based on the CBIM curriculum, Rooted In Resilience. NDS has identified a need to address both perpetration and victimization among youth and is currently engaging in collaboration to develop programs and services to meet this need.
c). Men as Perpetrators - in collaboration with A Turning Point (counseling services), is a voluntary support group, specifically for men (with families) who perpetrate abuse and are not yet systems involved. This pilot is in response to input from our clients (survivors) who are seeking resources to keep their families intact. It is an IPV intervention process with the goal of guiding men towards family harmony and healing. NDS provides support services to the survivors and children; A Turning Point provides services to the abuser.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Health
Social and economic status

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National Network to End Domestic Violence 2016

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims and oppressed people, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number of survivors and their children receiving services through one or more core Next Door Solutions programs.

Number of clients in residential care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Families, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Shelter Next Door & 24/7 Hotline

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of adults and children receiving 24/7 emergency shelter, including comprehensive case management.

Number of survivors receiving walk-in crisis counseling

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Community & Systems Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of survivors receiving Community & Systems Advocacy services of walk-in crisis counseling

Number of clients participating in support groups

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Support Groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

17 Support Groups are provided throughout Santa Clara County, with seven for Spanish speakers and one for male survivors. Most offer Kids Club - positive play for youth - during group hours.

Number of survivors receiving Self-Sufficiency case management during a 12 month period.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Self Sufficiency Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Survivors work one-on-one with a program advocate to identify self-sufficiency goals and barriers to achieving those goals. Case management uses the Eight Domains of Self-Sufficiency framework.

Number of clients provided with Housing Assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Domestic Violence Housing First

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Housing First Program that addresses the needs of domestic violence victims and assists the survivor in remaining housed

Number of clients provided with Legal Advocacy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Provides information about their legal rights; how to navigate the legal system, and how the courts work; assistance Restraining Orders; Peaceful Contact Workshops; and attorney consultations

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Next Door Solutions (NDS) serves individuals across the gender spectrum and of varying abilities with a vision of decreasing the number of people in Santa Clara County who will experience an abusive intimate partner relationship in their lifetime.

Safety: NDS offers services, such as crisis counseling, risk assessments and safety planning, and legal advocacy, so that survivors have tools to move to greater self-reliance.

Resiliency: Through peer counseling, parenting after violence workshops, and therapy services, survivors increase confidence, self-esteem, resiliency, and skills to decrease isolation, increase supportive relationships, manage stress, and to parent children exposed to violence. Youth receive assistance to address adverse childhood experienced trauma to prevent the possibility of future abuse and violent victimization and perpetration.

Housing: The housing crisis limits survivors’ access to safe, affordable, permanent housing. Through shelter and housing assistance services, NDS creates options for survivors to remain safely housed, or sheltered with pathways to safe, long-term housing.

NDS seeks to increase the diversity and cultural competency of the health care system, and in mobilizing community in addressing IPV and health disparities within Latinx communities. NDS’s outreach and education efforts for under-served and under-reached communities has underscored the need to strengthen community-level approaches to improving health care for all.

Prevention: NDS is driving community initiatives to increase IPV knowledge, its impacts, and available resources:
• Intersectionality of IPV and Health: partnerships with health clinics; advancing CUES EBP; partnership with Stanford School of Medicine
• Men, Boys, & Gender-Based Violence Initiative. Recognizing gender inequity as the underlying cause of gender-based violence, NDS works to establish healthy community norms that promote equality and make gender-based violence unacceptable, and further reinforces this by advocating for effective policy and funding for violence prevention efforts: 1). Men as Allies – Coaching Boys Into Men and Athletes as Leaders cohorts; 2). Men as Perpetrators – support groups for male non-systems involved perpetrators
• Safe Relationships in East San Jose – Promotores and Peacemakers


NDS builds upon its 50 year history of creating and implementing innovative services that address the needs of survivors, coupled with supportive community partnerships, in its work to further expand strategies of:
• Survivor-Defined intervention and advocacy programs focusing on increasing safety, knowledge, and options;
• Targeted policy and advocacy that support adequate life domains; and support safe relationships; and
• Prevention programming focused on strengthening individual knowledge and skills, community education, and fostering coalitions and networks, and social mobilization at the individual and community level, and policy making.

NDS' guiding principles are: NDS must
• Be responsive to survivor's immediate and long-term safety needs
• Partner and collaborate with other organizations to accomplish its goal
• Have policy and advocacy as a part of its work to effect societal change

NDS also recognizes that in order to decrease abuse on a societal level, men must be a part of the solution.

•NDS is the oldest and most comprehensive intimate partner violence (IPV) service provider in Santa Clara County, founded in 1971
• NDS has a consistent history of program delivery, innovation, and successful outcomes for clients
• NDS is recognized as a knowledge and thought leader in innovation, knowledge, and practice in Santa Clara County
• NDS staff are highly trained and educated professionals in all disciplines, administration through program, and are dedicated to eradicating IPV in our community. Advocates are trained/certified Domestic Violence Peer Counselors (State of California Evidence Code: Section 1037-1037.8) – a first step in establishing confidentiality; with additional training in Survivor-Defined Advocacy, Trauma Informed Care, Client-Centered Case Management, Motivational Interviewing, Supporting LGBTQAIP Survivors, and Cultural Responsiveness, and restraining orders/filing, court systems; and skills in advocacy, resource identification, and referrals. NDS’ service model is based on the Survivor-Defined Advocacy model that builds a partnership between the Advocate and client, who ultimately defines the advocacy and help they need. Advocates are bilingual-bicultural
• NDS service model is based upon Survivor-Defined Advocacy - a pragmatic approach to working with survivors that acknowledges and builds on the survivor's perspectives and their response to their partner's power and control; and client-centered services
• NDS has extensive experience in working within community partnerships with a goal of reaching more victims through collaborative efforts in implementing innovative approaches to create new and expanded access to DV services. NDS is a member of the Domestic Violence Advocacy Consortium of SCC whose members represent the five agencies that provide DV services; the Consortium provides advice, information, and education to community leaders – in all sectors. NDS staff sit on community committees, including the Family Court Committee, the SCC Death Review Committee (DV related), the SCC Continuum of Care (HUD-housing), and the SCC Service Provider Network. They also serve as advisors/commissioners to the County’s Domestic Violence Council, the Human Trafficking Commission, and work with members of the county’s Emergency Assistance Network providers.
• NDS facilitates DV survivor focus groups with other community partners to help build information and data to be used to enhance existing, or create new services, policy, and funding focuses/opportunities. For example, a NDS facilitated focus group on the topic of homelessness and criminal justice was used to inform the county’s IPV Task Force.
• NDS has received high ratings from the Nonprofit Finance Fund; Charity Navigator, criminal and legal justice system, and among other nonprofit organizations.
• NDS is committed to maintaining a strong and accountable infrastructure and a diverse funding system

In 2021, Next Door Solutions commemorates 50 years of dedicated service to those in Santa Clara County (SCC) who are impacted by IPV – and to our continued mission to end domestic violence in the moment and for all time. IPV is gender-based violence and is a human rights issue; it is prevalent in every community - affecting all people regardless of age, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, gender identity, race, culture, religion, or nationality.

Beginnings: In 1971, a group of local Latinas led by Bea Robinson Mendez – who themselves had experienced domestic abuse - established a crisis hotline, taking turns answering the calls. They also set up a shelter – in a garage – for those fleeing abuse – often with their children in tow. These women had no formal training, no funds to support their work, no strategic plan - what they did have was the vision for a better outcome for battered women and the willingness to do whatever it took to create hope and change. And with these simple acts they created the second IPV shelter in California and the first in the nation to offer bilingual services.

Today, Next Door Solutions remains grounded in service to our community – engaging more than 2,300 adults and children, each year, via Survivor-Defined services of shelter, housing, legal advocacy, risk assessment and safety planning, crisis intervention and group counseling, self-sufficiency case management, housing assistance, therapy, and children’s aligned services that support survivors and their families through all stages of their recovery; and continues to advance promising initiatives that focus on addressing systemic issues and community norms that perpetuate intimate partner abuse and violence (refer to previous sections).

Accomplishments Highlights:
• 2nd IPV shelter in the state of California: first in nation to offer bi-lingual services (1971)
• Largest array of services to address broader needs for survivors; more than 2,300 adults and children annually (50 years)
• HomeSafe collaboration – Santa Clara 2001, San Jose 2003: permanent, affordable, shared housing with support services (NDS) for IPV survivors and their children
• NDS leadership on the county-wide Greenbook Initiative to promote the connection between IPV and child maltreatment, piloting Joint Response between law enforcement and IPV advocates (2008)
• Key role in the formation of the SCC IPV Blue Ribbon Task Force and the release of the 2018 IPV Needs Assessment
• IPV and Healthcare Initiative –inroads into healthcare through clinic partnerships - needs assessments, assessment tool, and staff training on use of tool and IPV health impacts of IPV; outreach and advancing sector knowledge; collaboration with Stanford School of Medicine (2015 – current; https://dvhealth.nextdoorsolutions.org)
• DV Housing First Program: 2016 -current
• Coaching Boys Into Men and Athletes as Leaders cohorts in local high schools (2019-current)

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Victims/survivors of domestic/intimate partner violence, across the gender spectrum, and their children. Clients represent the diversity of Santa Clara County - race, ethnicity, economically, etc.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Santa Clara County communities disproportionately affected by COVID-19 are the same communities disproportionately affected by IPV, notably East San José zip codes of 95116, 95122, and 95127 - 18% of our clients reside in these zip codes. Racial/ethnic minority groups are disproportionate at-risk of contracting COVID-19. Despite representing 26% of the general SCC population, Latinx communities make up 51% of COVID-19 positive tests and 29% of deaths. NDS has increase outreach to these communities through community presentations and recruiting community volunteers are Promotores (community health workers) to increase the residents' knowledge of IPV, its impact and intersectionality with COVID-19, and information on IPV and COVID-19 resources.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    As part of client focus groups, NDS recruited participants to form an advisory group, El Comité de Mujeres Fuertes; whose members helped to identify needs in underserved populations and communitites. El Comité serve as Promotores (community health workers) and have been finalizing a “Train the Trainer” curriculum created in partnership with Stanford School of Medicine (2020-21).

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Not all provide feedback,

Financials

Next Door Solutions to Domestic Violence
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Next Door Solutions to Domestic Violence

Board of directors
as of 8/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Hillary Weingast

Juniper Networks

Term: 2017 - 2022

Melissa Hollatz

Attorney - Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich & Rossati

Michelle Puma

Director, Crawford, Pimental & Co.

Patricia Bashaw

Independent Biotechnology Professional

Erica Muhl-Shwartz

Attorney; Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich & Rosati

Herminia Ojeda

Financial Advisor; Ameriprise Financial Services

Lisa Villarreal

Business Development Manager; First American Exchange Co., LLC

Hillary Winegast

Head of Global Employment Law; Juniper Networks

Dennis Coonan

CFO, Nova Partners, Inc.

Dennis Coonan

CFO, Nova Partners, Inc.

Harmony Downs

HR Business Partner & Diversity & Inclusion Program Manager; Applied Materials

Kriti Garg

Program Manager, Mission Asset Fundr

Cheryl Halloran

Community Volunteer

James Murphy

Community Volunteer

Adaeze Nduaguba

Legal Assistanct, Products & Agreements; Google, LLC

Cris Paden

Director, Corporate Communications; Twilio Super Network

Shelly Pezanni

Medical Doctor; El Camino Hospital

Shannon Power

Sr. Director Global Business Operatins & Shared Services; Veritas Technologies, LLC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/18/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.