Rural Community Assistance Corporation

Creating vibrant, healthy, and enduring rural communities

aka RCAC   |   West Sacramento, CA   |  http://www.rcac.org

Mission

Mission RCAC provides training, technical and financial resources and advocacy so rural communities can achieve their goals and visions. Core Values • Leadership: identifies innovative strategies to further rural community and economic development and inspires partners to achieve great outcomes • Collaboration: achieves superior results by respectfully and inclusively identifying partners • Commitment: works with passion and dedication to improve rural communities and the lives of their low-income residents • Quality: produces exceptional work products to help our partners meet their goals • Integrity: practices the highest professional standards and cultural competency in our work

Ruling year info

1978

Chief Executive Officer

Suzanne Anarde

Main address

3120 Freeboard Dr Ste 201

West Sacramento, CA 95691 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-2512284

NTEE code info

Rural (S32)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

Environmental Quality, Protection, and Beautification N.E.C. (C99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing

RCAC assists nonprofit housing organizations to develop, finance and operate affordable housing programs and projects. RCAC provides both single- and multi-family housing solutions for diverse populations. RCAC services include project feasibility; funding applications; site selection and purchase; project design; and construction and housing management. We tailor our services to the specific needs of each client. RCAC also provides technical assistance, training and financial support to housing counseling agencies that serve rural communities.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

RCAC provides technical, managerial and financial training assistance to more than 500 rural and tribal communities in 11 states each year to create or maintain safe, reliable drinking water treatment and distribution systems, wastewater and solid waste systems. RCAC helps system operators comply with state and federal regulations to protect public health; trains board members and operators to obtain or renew mandatory operator certifications; helps set rates and provides access to resources, often through the RCAC Loan Fund. The Tribal Circuit Rider Program provides the same services on-site in reservation communities in California and Arizona, funded by EPA Region 9.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

The RCAC Loan Fund was established in 1988 as a source of flexible financing for rural nonprofit organizations and small communities to develop affordable housing, community facilities and water, wastewater and solid waste infrastructure. The U.S. Treastury certified the Loan Fund  as a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) in 1996. RCAC’s financing fills gaps and serves a population that has been traditionally neglected by conventional markets. RCAC’s financial products fulfill an immense need in rural communities, where less access to financial capital and cuts in federal budgets have created severe shortages. Lending capital as of July 2010 is more than $69 million. The Loan Fund does not make loans to individuals.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

Where we work

Accreditations

Community Development Financial Institutions Fund of the U.S. Department of the Treasury - Community Development Entity Certification (Annual) 2013

Aeris rated 4 Stars AA Policy Plus 2021

Awards

CARS rating 2010

Opportunity Finance Network

Affiliations & memberships

Partners for Rural Transformation 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Environmental Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Expand the quantity and types of training available to rural communities and organizations.

Percent of water and waste systems that receive assistance and maintain compliance with public health and environmental regulations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Environmental Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Ensure communities, and especially schools, have access to and increase consumption of safe drinking water.

Number of households served by new, rehabilitated or expanded water or wastewater projects

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Environmental Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Ensure communities, and especially schools, have access to and increase consumption of safe drinking water.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Leadership: identifies innovative strategies to further rural community and economic development and inspires partners to achieve great outcomes

Collaboration: achieves superior results by respectfully and inclusively
identifying partners

Commitment: works with passion and dedication to improve rural communities and the lives of their low-income residents

Quality: produces exceptional work products to help our partners meet their goals

Integrity: practices the highest professional standards and cultural competency
in our work

Strategic Directions

To support our local partners, RCAC will pursue the following strategic directions:

 Form regional collaborations to achieve economies of scale and take advantage of new opportunities

 Ensure communities, and especially schools, have access to and increase consumption of safe drinking water

 Expand the quantity and types of training available to rural communities and organizations.

 Diversify local nonprofit services to build more sustainable organizations

 Enhance the skills of organizations that provide infrastructure, housing and other essential services in Indian Country

 Provide development services to increase housing opportunities in rural communities

 Increase access to affordable mortgages for rural organizations and residents

 Build partnerships with local economic development organizations to expand small business lending

RCAC has a 43-year history of working to improve rural communities in the West. Experienced staff works directly with community members and incorporates leadership, capacity building, advocacy, and financial management into projects so that development is maintained for years to come. RCAC's work provides nonprofit organizations and rural communities with access to training, technical assistance, advocacy, resources, and financing. RCAC creates partnerships with state and local governments, tribes, self-help housing agencies, rural community development organizations, finance agencies, and technical assistance providers, and others to maximize its effectiveness. RCAC's strength is the breadth and depth of resources that it can bring to a given community.

RCAC's programs have positively impacted rural communities throughout the 13 western states and the Pacific islands for the past 43 years. RCAC is committed to improving and expanding its programs so that its partner nonprofit organizations and local and tribal governments will continue to grow stronger and have a greater impact in their communities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Low- to moderate-income residents of rural communities in 13 western states.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Rural Community Assistance Corporation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Rural Community Assistance Corporation

Board of directors
as of 5/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Vickie Oldman

Seven Sisters Community Development

Term: 2010 - 2022


Board co-chair

Frank Bravo

America First Multifamily Investors, LP

Term: 2013 - 2025

Marty Miller

Office of Rural and Farmworker Housing

John Sheehan

Plumas Corporation

Kim Peone

Colville Tribal Federal Corp

Claudia O'Grady

Utah Housing Corp

Nancy Brown

Schwab Bank

Carleen Herring

US Economic Development Administration

Nalani Fujimori Kaina

Legal Aid Society of Hawaii

Andres Cano

State Representative, Arizona House of Representatives

Frank Bravo

America First Multifamily Investors, LP

Vicki Oldman

Seven Sisters Community Development Group

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/11/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.