PLATINUM2023

INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE REHABILITATION COUNCIL

Improving Wildlife Care Worldwide

aka The IWRC   |   Eugene, OR   |  theiwrc.org

Mission

We provide evidence-based education and resources on wildlife rehabilitation to move the field of wildlife rehabilitation forward; to promote wildlife conservation and welfare; and to mitigate human-wildlife conflicts worldwide, through better understanding of wild animal ecology, behavior, and welfare.

Ruling year info

1979

Executive Director

Ms. Kai Williams

Main address

PO Box 3197

Eugene, OR 97403 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Wildlife Rehabilitation Council

EIN

94-2577910

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

Professional Societies, Associations (D03)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Many of the challenges wildlife face surviving in today's world are a direct result of human activity; roads, pesticides, herbicides, climate change, urban expansion all affect the success and failure of wild species. This complex issue must be addressed at a landscape level but also requires attention at the level of individual humans and animals. Policies and practices need to change, injuries and illnesses must be cared for, and wildlife needs to thrive in the wild.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Online Training

IWRC offers on demand online courses, incorporating lectures, discussions, labs, and web-based examinations. Rotating courses include parasitology, zoonoses, fluid therapy, wound management, and pain management. Additional courses are in production.

Population(s) Served
Adults

IWRC’s Journal of Wildlife Rehabilitation, Member Directory and the Animal Placement List provide a world of resources, and the opportunity to meet and consult with colleagues both near and far. Through the organizations diverse network, members have access to experts in various areas, unique insights on issues affecting wildlife, populations, species, and habitats.

Population(s) Served
Adults

One and two day lecture and lab courses on wildlife rehabilitation taught by request around the globe

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents

In 2007, IWRC introduced the Certified Wildlife Rehabilitator (CWR) certificate program as part of their mission to raise the quality of care provided to wildlife in distress. Although certification is voluntary, receiving certification is an objective affirmation that a rehabilitator has met minimum knowledge standards. Certification shows permitting agency personnel, veterinarians, and members of the public, a rehabilitators’ commitment to professionalism and providing the highest quality care. IWRC serves as the certification body, administering the exam, but certification policies are managed by an independent board, the Certification Review Board.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

In 2022, 97.48% of IWRC students reported that the Basic Wildlife Rehabilitation Course will make them more proficient in their wildlife rehabilitation work.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The IWRC, incorporated in 1975, seeks to improve the welfare, care and treatment of injured, ill, and displaced wild animals by providing science-based education and resources to wildlife professionals and the public to promote wildlife conservation and welfare worldwide. Our five-year strategic plan focuses on the following areas: providing basic and continuing education for wildlife rehabilitators through high quality and science based training courses; publishing a peer-reviewed Journal to inform rehabilitators of new developments in the field of wildlife rehabilitation; providing resources for rehabilitators to meet and network; and managing and promoting a certification scheme for wildlife rehabilitators.

Raising the skill set of wildlife rehabilitators is essential to improve the treatment and welfare of casualty wild animals. The IWRC provides high quality training with practical skill components delivered both online and in person to students in over 15 countries. We are also keen to promote the use of other online tools, such as webinars and global collaborative forums. The IWRC administers the Certified Wildlife Rehabilitator (CWR) program, a voluntary assessment & objective affirmation that a rehabilitator has met minimum knowledge standards. Certification shows permitting agency personnel, veterinarians, and members of the public, a rehabilitator's commitment to providing the highest quality care. The IWRC has published the peer reviewed Journal of Wildlife Rehabilitation for 46 years to disseminate information among professionals and provide a platform to communicate ongoing research in the field of wildlife rehabilitation. The Journal is published three times a year and is distributed to individuals and libraries worldwide.

IWRC has a vast network of experts in skills related to wildlife rehabilitation that allow us to create best practice content to train today's wildlife rehabilitators. We also work with education design experts to provide the materials in an engaging and absorbable manner. We are constantly growing our network of experts around the world.

Rehabilitators in over 30 countries use The IWRC to access state of the field information on wildlife rehabilitation. We connect rehabilitators to each other through our courses, our membership, and certification; strengthening the professional ties between rehabilitators and also with other professionals in the conservation community. IWRC collaborates with other nonprofit agencies, corporations, and governmental entities. IWRC is an official Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Learning Partner, approved for veterinary continuing education in multiple jurisdictions, and sits executive leadership on country level committees to improve wildlife rehabilitation.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE REHABILITATION COUNCIL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE REHABILITATION COUNCIL

Board of directors
as of 07/13/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Suzanne Pugh

RSPCA

Term: 2021 - 2023

Lloyd Brown

Wildlife Rescue of Dade County

Susan Wylie

Le Nichoir Wild Bird Rehabilitation

Brooke Durham

Rep4Wildlife

Suzanne Pugh

RSPCA

Susie Sullivan

Harmonix

Robert Adamski

Danene Birtell

OWCN

Jennifer Boonstra

Daniela Castillo

Castillo Animal Veterinary

Lindsay Jones

Diane Seguin

Peter Stathis

Meredith Whitney

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/03/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.