GOLD2023

New Israel Fund

aka NIF   |   Philadelphia, PA   |  www.nif.org

Mission

Achieve equality for all the citizens of the state regardless of religion, national origin, race, gender or sexual orientation;
Realize the civil and human rights of all individuals and groups through the protection of Palestinian citizens and other marginalized minorities, including the advancement of collective rights, and opposition to all forms of discrimination and bigotry;
Recognize and reinforce the essential pluralism of Israeli society and tolerance for diversity;
Protect the access of minorities to democratic channels for the expression of their interests and identities and the promotion of their rights;
Empower civil society in Israel as the fundamental vehicle of an open society;
Build and maintain a just society at peace with itself and its neighbors.

Ruling year info

1979

CEO

Mr. DANIEL SOKATCH

Main address

PO Box 70358

Philadelphia, PA 19176-0358 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-2607722

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

NIF’s approach has undergone key strategy shifts over time, covering three main periods: A) Founding Idea (1979): Build up progressive civil society where there was none, catalyze citizen activism, and develop a third sector to address social inequalities; B) In the Face of the Democratic Recession (2014): Focus on protecting democracy from its most significant threats in the face of growing populism and anti-democratic trends; C) Pandemic and Political Instability (2020-2021): Recalibrate to balance long-term effectiveness with enhancing flexibility to handle emerging threats in an unstable world.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Civil & Human Rights

TO PROTECT AND PROMOTE THE RIGHTS OF ALL CITIZENS AND RESIDENTS IN ISRAEL INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ARAB CITIZENS AND RESIDENTS, FOREIGN WORKERS AND REFUGEES,PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES, LESBIANS AND GAYS, THE ELDERLY, NEW IMMIGRANTS, WOMEN, AND OTHER DISENFRANCHISED POPULATIONS. WE ALSO AIM TO BRING EQUAL ACCESS AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES TO ALL CITIZENS - AS RELATES TO EMPLOYMENT, EDUCATION, HEALTHCARE, RESOURCE ALLOCATIONS, AND OTHER SERVICES AND TO CREATE AN ACTIVE AND INFLUENTIAL CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN ISRAEL.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of non-monetary support contacts per grantee

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Achieve equality for all the citizens of the state regardless of religion, national origin, race, gender or sexual orientation;
Realize the civil and human rights of all individuals and groups through the protection of Palestinian citizens and other marginalized minorities, including the advancement of collective rights, and opposition to all forms of discrimination and bigotry;
Recognize and reinforce the essential pluralism of Israeli society and tolerance for diversity;
Protect the access of minorities to democratic channels for the expression of their interests and identities and the promotion of their rights;
Empower civil society in Israel as the fundamental vehicle of an open society;
Build and maintain a just society at peace with itself and its neighbors.

New Initiatives for Democracy: Our Strategies
Liberal forces in Israel — intellectuals, activists, political leaders, and members of the public who share progressive values — are currently struggling to influence the national discourse on the issues of the day and mobilize support for progressive approaches to addressing them.

It is the right wing narrative, emanating from the political echelon, from the media, or from new media campaigns, — which shapes too much of the current “conventional wisdom.” The power of the right in advancing its own agenda has been amplified through a set of coordinated functional organizations — think tanks, media centers, and organizing vehicles — which they have built and funded over the past two decades.

The ability of progressive forces to effectively advance our agenda depends on our ability to create a much stronger set of organizations that cross-cut individual issues and unite and expand our sector. NIF has identified a set of strategies to build the infrastructure and game-changers that Israel needs now:

Change the discourse and advance our values with new partners who can articulate a progressive vision and policy.
Change Israelis’ day-to-day lives for the better by promoting solutions at the local level.
Enlist activists in progressive campaigns by using online engagement to build an activist community.
Build bridges to new constituencies by reaching out to less liberal communities in ways that emphasize shared values.
Build bridges to communities outside the progressive camp with whom we share values by partnering with a think-do tank that creates new alliances and possibilities.
Move policy from military to political solutions by reclaiming national security to include progressive ideals.
Engage the next generation in revitalizing Israeli democracy by refining training and engagement to create progressive leadership.
Challenge growing right-wing bias in the media with sophisticated Media Monitoring and Rapid Response to misinformation.

Grantmaking: NIF has granted more than $250 million to more than 850 organizations in 35 years. Ranging from large grants to organizations like the Association of Civil Rights in Israel, our flagship grantee, to small grants to community organizations working on social change at the local level, our grantmaking procedure is rigorous, transparent and based on collaborative partnerships with our grantees.
Empowerment: We know that it takes more than money to make lasting change. That’s why we invest in people. We find and train people who can be leaders and activists in all sectors of Israeli society – among veteran Israelis and new immigrants; Palestinian Arabs and African asylum-seekers; women, the disabled and LGBT; ultra-Orthodox, traditional and secular.
SHATIL, NIF’s action arm, employs more than 100 Israeli professionals in our offices in Jerusalem, Haifa and Beer-Sheva. Through trainings, consulting and capacity-building, we empower social change agents: non-profit staff, social entrepreneurs, activists, students, public sector professionals and others. We also work with local authorities, academia, business representatives and others who share our commitment to create a more just and democratic society.
Coalitions: We believe in the power of collaboration. NIF funds, and SHATIL organizes and provides professional services to, a broad range of coalitions and forums in Israel in a variety of issue areas including social justice, human rights, and religious pluralism.
Advocacy: As a proudly progressive organization, the New Israel Fund advocates for a liberal, democratic and inclusive Israel. From social media to the mainstream media to local municipalities to the halls of the Knesset, we speak out and empower others to speak so that the voices of marginalized Israelis are heard. And we speak out in favor of inclusive and free discourse in the Diaspora as well; we think Israel is a strong democracy capable of withstanding debate about its most serious and controversial issues.
Fellowships: NIF Invests in the Next Generation of Leaders with the Law Fellowship, NIF/SHATIL Social Justice Fellowship, Everett Fellowship, The New Generations Tzedek Fellowship (SF Bay Area).

Recent NIF successes include:

Israel Funds Non-Orthodox Rabbis
In a landmark victory for religious pluralism, the government announced that it will now allow rabbis from the Reform and Conservative movements to serve as state-salaried community rabbis. The decision follows a seven-year legal struggle by veteran NIF grantee Israel Religious Action Center.

Knesset Raises Minimum Age of Marriage
The Knesset raised the minimum age of marriage from 17 to 18. The vote followed a ten-year campaign by NIF grantee the Working Group for Equality in Personal Status Issues. The legislation is an important safeguard for girls’ rights to education and equal opportunity, with particular impact among Arab and ultra-Orthodox communities.

Ofakim Celebrates New Overnight Medical Center
Thanks to the efforts of NIF grantee Ahuzat Negev, the residents of Ofakim are celebrating the announcement that a 24/7 urgent care center will be opened in their town. This decision follows a two year campaign focusing on the lack of medical facilities on Israel’s geographical periphery, particularly when it comes to emergency services.

Success for Arab Women in the Municipal Elections
The number of female representatives of Arab municipalities nearly doubled in Israel’s municipal elections. This follows a major NIF grant to five organizations – led by grantees Mossawa and Women against Violence – for the purpose of increasing female representation from all parties on local councils.

Breakthrough for Movement for Freedom of Information
Transferring government resources to private companies must now be made public. The decision follows a number of cases, such as the building of express lanes on the Tel Aviv highway and the discovery of offshore natural gas, in which the state passed control of public resources over to private for-profit companies without outside scrutiny. The ruling is the result of a concerted campaign by NIF grantee the Movement for Freedom of Information.

Consequences for Discrimination against Arabs
In a precedent-setting ruling, the Haifa Magistrate Court approved a settlement against a real estate developer who discriminated against Arab buyers. Flagship NIF grantee the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI) played an important role in this case fighting discrimination in land allocation.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

New Israel Fund
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

New Israel Fund

Board of directors
as of 10/27/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Rachel Liel

Elah Alkalay

Naomi Chazan

Yossi Dahan

Itzik Danziger

Peter Edelman

Paul Egerman

Janine Frier

Lisa Greer

Stephen Gunther

Jim Koshland

Rachel Liel

Brian Lurie

David Myers

Talia Sasson

Susan Snider

Yael Sternhell

Jenna Weinberg

Reem Younis

Carole Zabar

Noeleen Cohen

Michael Bien

Jonathan Penkin

Avi Glezerman

Nasreen Hadad Haj Yahya

Linda Herskovitz

Jarron Bernstien

Karen Adler

Yasmeen Abu-Fraiha

Yosepha Tabib-Calif

Daniel Price

Daniel Sokatch

Ric Benjamin

Yoseffa Tabib-Calif

Basma Khalaf

Sally Gottesman

Jonathan Shkedi

Meital Pinto

Gabriella Willenz

Michael Bien

Yasmeen Abu-Fraiha

Paul Burger

Aaron David Miller

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/25/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/25/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.