PLATINUM2023

Family House, Inc.

Keeping Families Together

aka 94-2722663   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.familyhouseinc.org

Mission

Family House serves as a home away from home for families of children with cancer and other life-threatening illnesses by providing physical comfort and emotional support, free from financial concerns.

Ruling year info

1981

CEO

Ms. Alexandra E Morgan

Main address

540 Mission Bay Blvd. North

San Francisco, CA 94158 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-2722663

NTEE code info

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

When a child is diagnosed with cancer or other serious illness, it turns a family’s life upside down. Often a child who receives a life-threatening diagnosis requires specialized treatment only available at major medical facilities that may be far away from home. And for many parents, the additional costs of staying at a hotel or motel for the days, weeks or months their child may require hospitalization is well beyond their financial means. By providing cost-free temporary housing, Family House is able to relieve some of these financial burdens so families can focus on their child’s healing. But Family House is more than just a place to stay – it’s a home away from home, and a supportive community of people who are dedicated to providing a caring environment for the entire family while their child is undergoing treatment.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing Families - Family House's Mission

Family House provides free, temporary housing and support services to up to 80 families per night whose children are being treated for a critical illness at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. Our goal is to alleviate some of the daily emotional and financial strains families are experiencing so they can focus on healing their child. All our family services are provided 100% free of charge.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Healthcare Hospitality Network Certified House 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of room nights provided annually for families with a critically ill child

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Housing Families - Family House's Mission

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All families are referred by UCSF’s social workers who screen patient families by diagnosis (cancer is a priority); distance from San Francisco (at least 50 mi. away); and economic need.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Housing Families - Family House's Mission

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

COVID-19 has impacted our occupancy levels since 2020. We anticipate we will get back to pre-pandemic levels soon, but we must remain vigilant for the safety of the sick children we serve.

Average length of stay (in days)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Housing Families - Family House's Mission

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Families can stay as long or as often as they need while their child is undergoing treatment.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Housing Families - Family House's Mission

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We look forward to being able to welcome in-person volunteers as COVID-19 protocols allow us to. We are grateful for all the virtual volunteers who help us in the meantime!

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Housing Families - Family House's Mission

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Founded in 1981, the mission of Family House is to serve as a home away from home for families of children with cancer and other life-threatening illnesses by providing physical comfort and emotional support free from financial concerns. We provide cost-free, temporary housing to families whose children are being treated at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. All families are referred to Family House by UCSF’s pediatric social workers who prescreen patient families by diagnosis (cancer is priority); distance from San Francisco (must live at least 50 miles away); and economic disadvantage/inability to afford local accommodations.

We are open 365 days per year, 24 hours a day and can serve up to 80 families per night (approximately 240 individual guests). Since moving into our Mission Bay location in 2016, we have operated at near maximum capacity on a nightly basis.

Family House has - and will continue to - cultivate and engage a broad cross section of donors and supporters from the greater bay area and beyond (including individuals, corporations and foundations) to fund the general operations of the organization. We also leverage the resources of more than 3,000 strategic partners and volunteers annually who play a pivotal role at Family House, assisting our small staff in providing a safe and comfortable home for families in crisis. (Our volunteer to staff ratio is 100 to 1.) Harnessing the power of volunteers allows us to extend the value of each dollar donated, but more important than the financial value is the impact on the quality of life for families. In a recent survey, 81% of guest families reported that the services provided by volunteers had a direct and positive impact on their family during their stay.

Family House has a strong team of dedicated staff, board and volunteers who have a track record of not only reaching but exceeding budgetary and programmatic goals.

Our occupancy rate averages 90% each night (80 rooms/approx.240 guests per night capacity). In addition to free housing we provided the following necessities and amenities that aim to keep families healthy and strong:
• Weekday breakfast program every morning for all families
• Dinners provided by volunteer groups 3-4 nights per week
• Eight food pantries kept stocked so parents may cook their own meals at no cost
• Donated clothing, diapers, and baby food provided year-round
• Support groups and music therapy sessions
• Private consultations with trained social workers

To help alleviate stress, more than 3,000 volunteers annually help provide uplifting experiences for parents, patients and siblings alike to enrich the quality of life during their stay:
• Fozzy's Toy Room so every child get a new toy upon check-in
• Weekly crafts and activities
• Holiday celebrations
• Celebrity visits
• Cookie and story time readings
• Therapy dog visits
• Popcorn and a movie every Friday night

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We ask for feedback when a family leaves, some families stay for months so theirs may be delayed

Financials

Family House, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Family House, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/27/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Todd Kovacevich

Deloitte Consulting LLP

Adrienne Bavar

Bavar Properties Group

Josh Bazinet

Nibbi Brothers General Contractors

John Beaven

Golden State Warriors

Michele Brasch

Law Office of Michele Brasch

Sloane Conway

Matt Cook

UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals

Jessica Finkelstein

Pinterest

Sara Agah Franti

Do It For The Love Foundation

Linda Goldfarb

Anomaly Vineyards

Steve Goldfarb

Anomaly Vineyards

Nancy Grand

Michelle Hermiston

UCSF Department of Pediatrics

Mark Jones

MAJO Consulting LLC

Jim Kauffman

Marriott Hotels (retired)

Kevin Keenley

Fundamental Capital LLC

Todd Kovacevich

Deloitte Consulting LLP

John Kugler

Nibbi Brothers General Contractors

Deborah Kurtin

Hanmin Lee

UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital

Scott MIller

Mizuho

Mark Orsi

Orsi Family Vineyards

Mark Petri

Plastikon Industries

Clare Rubey

Meta

Randi Saffian

Jill Thompson

UCSF School of Medicine

Kathleen Toney

Tara Voorhis

Collin Williams

Highline Sciences

Selina Tobaccowala

Openfit

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/27/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/29/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.