CALIFORNIA FOUNDATION FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTERS

Sacramento, CA   |  www.cfilc.org

Mission

Increasing access and equal opportunity for people with disabilities by building the capacity of Independent Living Centers.

Ruling year info

1982

Executive Director

Teresa Favuzzi

Deputy Director

Christina Mills

Main address

1000 G Street, Suite 100

Sacramento, CA 95814 USA

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EIN

94-2838242

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

Management & Technical Assistance (Y02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Ability Tools

Ability Tools is dedicated to expanding the availability of tools, resources and technology that increases independence, improves personal productivity and enhances the quality of life of Californians with disabilities.

We support 14 Device Lending Libraries, 4 Reuse Centers and 28 Independent Living Centers throughout the state.

We provide funding, training, and technical assistance to a network of over 1500 organizations and individuals. We lead the California Assistive Technology Reuse Coalition made up of 14 organizations performing and promoting AT reuse initiatives.

Population(s) Served

The Disability Organizing Network is a collaboration of 28 Independent Living Centers and the communities we serve. CFILC functions as a statewide information, training and technical assistance hub. Each ILC has one full-time staff person dedicated to organizing the local community of people with disabilities into action for social change.

We support building accessible communities through organizing campaigns that are driven by community members to increase access and equality for people with disabilities.

CFILC provides training, technical assistance and support to local communities as they develop strategies to increase access to transportation, healthcare, education and the community at large.

CFILC maintains a statewide website, we feed social media sites, and we moderate listservs for ILC organizers and local action teams. We provide regular statewide teleconference campaign calls, and training webinar series.

http://disabilityorganizing.net/

Population(s) Served

The YO! program is built upon a foundation that promotes youth leadership and civic engagement as the key to developing employment and educational goals.

YO! offers youth with disabilities aged 16-28, across all types of disabilities the opportunity to volunteer within one of California’s 28 Independent Living Centers.

YO! has three main goals:
--to connect, educate and organize youth with disabilities to participate in civic engagement;

--provide volunteer and leadership opportunities for youth with disabilities that lead to higher education, economic self-sufficiency and independence;

--to increase the capacity of Independent Living Centers to serve youth with disabilities.

Population(s) Served

Connecting low-income people with disabilities to affordable internet services.

Population(s) Served

An alternative loan program designed to assist Californians with Disabilities to access low-interest loans to purchase assistive technology, and/or to achieve home of vehicle modifications in order to live, work, learn and play independently.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

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Affiliations & memberships

National Council on Independent Living 2016

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CFILC's goals are to increase access and equal opportunities for Californian's with disabilities. We seek to improve the options that people with all types of disabilities, of all ages have as the live, learn and earn.

One of our key strategies is to build the capacity of our network of California Centers for Independent Living Centers (ILCs). Twenty-eight ILCs in fifty communities provide services and advocacy to over 100,000 people annually. CFILC functions as a training and technical assistance center for California. All of our programs leverage, support and build the capacity California's ILCs to work, grow and thrive in their local communities.

ILCs are non-profits (501c3) that are run by for and about people with disabilities, we use a peer model of service and advocacy strategy that welcomes people with any type of disability to access services. Our board, staff and management always consist of 51% or more people with disabilities.

CFILC's Assistive Technology Network supports Assistive Technology Advocates in California ILCs, while also building a broad network of agencies, partnerships and collaborations to get Assistive Technologies into the hands of people who need it. We employ a host of capabilities through our trainings, webinars, technical assistance, toll-free line, online exchange, device lending libraries, reuse centers, loan guarantees and one-to-one advocacy, we make obtaining Assistive Technology a reality.

CFILC's Disability Organizing Network supports people with disabilities to build accessible communities. Through training, technical assistance, and a statewide communications infrastructure we support 28 ILCs build local and regional campaigns to increase access to Healthcare, Education, Housing, and Transportation.

CFILC's Youth Organizing! Disabled & Proud supports youth with disabilities by providing volunteer opportunities within ILCs across California. YO! Volunteers learn both hard and soft skills working side by side with staff how have a variety of disabilities. YO! Volunteers make a year long commitment and earn a stipend, as they work on youth driven organizing campaigns like teaching disability history in schools and bullying prevention.

CFILC's Digital Access Project is focused on increasing access to internet services for people with disabilities. We offer low-cost internet service options to the disability community, through a network of partners statewide. We assist our community in accessing low-cost refurbished computers, laptops and tables, and we work to identify local accessible digital literacy training centers so that people with disabilities know where to learn about how to use technology.

CFILC is a learning organization, we are constantly assessing and evaluating our progress and making course changes as needed. We look to be innovative, we try new things and while sometimes we fail, we always learn!

We have made progress in our AT Network program by winning federal funding this year to create the FreedomTech Loan Guarantee program. This program will make it possible for low to moderate income people needing expensive Assistive Technology to get low interest loans.

We made progress in or DO Network program by building an interactive website and launching a social media strategy, and by re-branding an old and confusing program name (Systems Change Network) to a name that was chosen by the community. We broadened our network to support not just the ILCs, but to directly engage the communities that local centers serve.

We made progress in our YO! program by integrating key youth issues into our other programs. We have increased the number of opportunities that youth have to participate in YO!, as Volunteers, as Action Team members, as Youth Advisory Council members, and through shorter summer internships with YO! as well as other programs locally, statewide and nationally.

We made progress in our DAP project by identifying barriers to internet adoption, and working with community partners and funders we were gifted donations of technology and funding that allow us to offer free modems to people with disabilities, saving individuals $60 in set up fees-which was the biggest barrier to gaining digital access.

Financials

CALIFORNIA FOUNDATION FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTERS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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CALIFORNIA FOUNDATION FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTERS

Board of directors
as of 4/29/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ana Acton

FREED Center for Indepdent Living

Term: 2015 - 2017


Board co-chair

Larry Grable

Service Center for Independent Life

Term: 2015 - 2017

Evan LeVang

Independent Living Services Northern California

Sheri Burns

Silicon Valley Independent Living Center

Adam Brown

Community Resource for Independence

Danny Anderson

Independent Living Resource Center Santa Barbara

David DeNola

Center for the Independence of Individuals with Disabilities

Jessie Lorenz

Independent Living Resource Center San Francisco

Jan Vitro

Rolling Start Inc.

Elsa Quezada

Central Coast Center for Independent Living

Paul Van Doren

Community Access Center

Dolores Nason

Disability Resouce Center

Stuart James

Center for Independent Living

Susan Miller

Placer Independent Living Services

Paula Margeson

Dayle McIntosh Center

Susan Rotchy

Independent Living Resources

Jimmie Soto

Independent Living Center Kern County

Ron Halog

Community Resouces for Independent Living

Eli Gelardin

Marin Center for Independent Living

Louis Frick

Access to Independence

Anastasia Bacigalupo

Westside Center for Independent Living, Los Angeles

Donalyn Sjostrand

Tri-County Independent Living Center, Eureka

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No