PLATINUM2024

OHLONE HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Not a Shelter, More Than a Rescue, All for the Animals.

aka OHS   |   Fremont, CA   |  https://ohlonehumanesociety.org

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Mission

It is the mission of Ohlone Humane Society to inspire respect and compassion for all animals, advocate for their interests and welfare, and instill in our community that all living beings have a right to be treated humanely.

Ruling year info

1983

President

Diane Shaw

Main address

39120 Argonaut Way, PMB 108

Fremont, CA 94538 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-2894323

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (D01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

It is the mission of Ohlone Humane Society to inspire respect and compassion for all animals, advocate for their interests and welfare, and instill in our community that all living beings have a right to be treated humanely. We work closely with the community to address the issues of pet homelessness, keeping pets and families together, responding to requests from the community to rehabilitate and release injured or orphaned wildlife, including community cats and strays.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Info Line

Our Info Line serves residents of Fremont, Newark, and
Union City, CA. We accept telephone calls and emails on
any animal-related concerns or questions. The Info Line
personnel will forward calls and emails to the best
volunteers in OHS who can provide answers or resources.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Special veterinary assistance offers financial support for extremely low income clients that have a pet with a urgent or basic care needs. Client must live in Fremont, Newark, or Union City, CA and will be offered urgent or basic care at a local partnered veterinary clinic. We are unable to support long-term illness but animals are evaluated on a case by case basis.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers

The OHS kitten foster program evolved to assist sick and abandoned kittens or even entire litters of feral moms trapped by OHS. The feral mothers are usually returned to their colonies after nursing and spay, but most of the kittens become happy loved family members. Kittens are spayed/neutered through our OHS voucher program, vaccinated with community donations, socialized while under foster care and then adopted to qualified animal lovers.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers

The OHS Pet Therapy Program enables people to interact with companion animals which has proven health benefits. Studies show these interactions can have positive effects on both the emotional and physical well-being. OHS’s therapy teams visit Tri-City senior care facilities, schools and the library. Senior patients and residents are always very welcoming, especially if they used to have pets of their own. Our pet therapy teams enjoy visiting high school students during finals week. Having trained support animals on campus helps provide calming moments during an especially stressful time.

And yes—those ARE dogs in the library! Therapy dogs visit local libraries at our popular monthly Read-to-a-Dog sessions. This popular program provides a supportive environment for children who are shy about reading aloud or are working on reducing fear of animals. The children read from library books or learn how to interact with our therapy dogs, sometimes by simply petting or talking to them.

Population(s) Served
Families
Seniors
Children

Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) is a way to provide a humane approach to addressing the overpopulation of community cats in the Tri-City area and reduce the euthanization rate in our local animal shelter. The successful implementation of the TNR team has resulted in both education of the public and actively helping those who are unable to perform trapping and the stages of TNR. Through TNR, we save cats’ lives, effectively reducing the breeding cycle and addressing community concerns to improve the shared environment between humans and outdoor cats.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers

Our OHS Humane Education program includes our new Youth & Family Opportunities to provide access for all ages to engage children and establish a lifelong respect and empathy for all living creatures. Our educational offerings promote compassion for other people, awareness of the environment and natural habitats, and the realization of an interconnection between humans and our planet. For local K-6 Educators, OHS is pleased to fully sponsor Kind News educational magazine classroom subscriptions, with issues delivered to them five times/year. Each student receives their own copy of Kind News to take home to their family and inspire discussion on compassion, empathy and respect for all animals. The OHS Humane Education program has also developed narrated animal books online and an e-book library on companion animal care, animal rescue stories, and local wild animals seen at our wildlife rehabilitation center.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Our Pet Meals on Wheels & Pet Pantry provides food and supplies for pets of Tri-City unhoused or residents in need. We distribute over 200-400 pounds of donated pet food each week to community resource centers, individuals, and seniors unable to afford the basic feeding needed for their pets. Our goal is to keep families and pets together.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Seniors

Ohlone Humane Society offers spay-neuter assistance to residents of Fremont, Newark and Union City. Our co-pay vouchers help spay and neuter several hundred domestic animals and feral cats each year. Spay-neuter is not only critical for curbing animal overpopulation, but has health and behavioral benefits for pets and our community. In addition to our feral cat vouchers, our domestic voucher program covers companion animals including dogs, cats, and small animals such as rabbits.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers

The Ohlone Humane Society Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, located in Newark, CA, is an extraordinary place for people who love to support the care of injured and orphaned wild animals of all kinds and for individuals seeking information about careers in animal care. Our wildlife center hospital is supported by volunteers, memberships and community donations.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Unsung Heroes Award 2021

25th District of California

FELINE FOSTER HEROES TOP 10 FINALIST 2022

GREATER GOOD FELINE FOSTER HEROES TOP 10 FINALIST

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION 2022

CALIFORNIA STATE ASSEMBLY

COMMENDATION 2021

ALAMEDA COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP AWARD 2021

Lam Research Corporation

COMMUNITY HEROES AWARD 2020

25th District of California

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Kitten Foster Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Low-income people, Families, Veterans, Foster and adoptive parents

Related Program

Spay/Neuter Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total pounds of pet food and litter distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Low-income people

Related Program

Pet Meals-On-Wheels & Pet Pantry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Ohlone Humane Society (OHS) was established in 1983 to facilitate and support the building of a public animal shelter for Fremont, Newark and Union City. The municipal animal shelter provides resources for the public, but the community has grown and more diverse services are needed. OHS assesses community needs and develops programs to bridge the gaps between the public and the shelter or other community programs in animal welfare. Basically, we see a need and try to find a way to solve it.


Our basic strategies are to identify the needs of our community. Programs recently developed or programs reactivated and updated include the following: Wildlife Rehabilitation Center to treat and release injured wildlife, Wildlife Center Gardens to create a sustainable food supplement for the animals at the center, Trap-Neuter-Return of local free-roaming and overpopulating cats, Kitten Foster & Adoption Program to provide medical care, spay-neuter and homes for the kittens found and abandoned in the community, Pet Therapy to provide emotional and reading support for students, seniors, and families, Spay-Neuter Voucher Program for low income pet owners and for trappers of community cats/kittens, Pet Pantry & Pet Meals on Wheels to provide pet food and supplies to keep families together, and Humane Education to expand public awareness of our animal life and human-animal compassion and kindness.

Through these programs, we interact with our residents who find themselves faced with injured wildlife, emotional responses to personal crises including fear of animals, multiplying cat litters and colonies throughout their city, homelessness and income levels so low they cannot afford to provide vet care for their pets, as well as conservation of our wildlife and our natural habitats.

With the continuation of our foster and adoption program, the focus has targeted orphan kitten rescue and TNR to address the multitude of community abandoned, surrendered or stray un-neutered cats and kittens. OHS has rescued over 750 kittens and was the only rescue open in the East Bay area for several months during the pandemic. OHS totally foster-based rescue program has provided medical care, spay-neuter, and found every one of the kittens or adoptable mama cats forever homes.

This year the foster program is partnering with other smaller local rescues and spay neuter clinics to build a community effort to keep the feral cat population at manageable levels. To support this effort, OHS developed a team of trained volunteers who have coordinated with our spay-neuter voucher program to trap, neuter and return over 1,000 community cats and kittens since 2018, ensuring reduction in the feral cat population in a growing area.

Similarly, our wildlife center was the only rehabilitation center open in the area during the pandemic and rehabilitates over 800 animals a year. In addition, we have an active fundraising and philanthropic team applying for grants nationally and locally as well as generous donors providing funding and in-kind donations to support the animals and efforts toward providing them a safe environment.

To further assist our community, our Pet Meals on Wheels program and Pet Pantry last year acquired and distributed over 15,000 pounds of pet food to our homeless and low income population. We have resumed our Special Assistance program for medical care of companion animals for low income families.

We are currently expanding our efforts toward animal welfare education of families through translations of e-booklets into several languages and working on distribution of these books into elementary school immersion classes.

With the reactivation of our foster and adoption program, the focus shifted to orphan kitten rescue to address the multitude of community abandoned, surrendered or stray un-neutered cats and kittens. OHS has rescued over 600 kittens and was the only rescue open in the East Bay area for several months during the pandemic. OHS totally foster-based rescue program has provided medical care, spay-neuter, and found every one of the kittens or adoptable mama cats forever homes. This year the foster program is partnering with other smaller local rescues and spay neuter clinics to build a community effort to keep the feral cat population at manageable levels.
To support this effort, OHS developed a team of trained volunteers who have coordinated with our spay-neuter voucher program to trap, neuter and return over 900 community cats and kittens since 2018, ensuring reduction in the feral cat population in a growing area.

Similarly, our wildlife center was the only rehabilitation center open in the area during the pandemic and rehabilitates over 800 animals a year. In addition, we have an active fundraising and philanthropic team applying for grants nationally and locally as well as generous donors providing funding and in-kind donations to support the animals and efforts toward providing them a safe environment.

To further assist our community, our Pet Meals on Wheels program and Pet Pantry last year acquired and distributed over 10,000 pounds of pet food to our homeless and low income population.

OHS plans to continue these programs through fundraising, donations and grants, as well as expand our educational efforts through print and online instructional booklets and guides to attempt to imprint the value of all living beings upon our youth and families, impress upon them the need for conservation of resources, empathy, kindness, and compassion and create respect and responsibility for the care, inclusion, and humane treatment of all.

Some of the ways we hope to expand our programs include:

Increase our presence by instructing interested residents in the trapping and care of community cats and kittens, thereby addressing the problems sooner before more cats reproduce.

Reach out to the schools and local organizations with community sustainable gardening activities to protect our natural habitats and local wildlife. Develop publications and program to support pet care and safety as well as compassionate interactions.

Connect and join forces with more food pantries to reach even greater numbers of people and pets in need.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

OHLONE HUMANE SOCIETY INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

OHLONE HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Board of directors
as of 02/20/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Diane Shaw

Ohlone Humane Society

Term: 2023 - 2025

Betty Wargo

Abbie Balland

Hilary Danehy

Sylvia Rivera

Natalia Lebedeva

Diane Shaw

Dalia Vernikovsky

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/18/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/22/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.