ALAMEDA COUNTY COMMUNITY FOOD BANK

Until everyone's fed.

aka ACCFB   |   Oakland, CA   |  http://www.accfb.org

Mission

Alameda County Community Food Bank passionately pursues a hunger-free community. We serve 1 in 5 county residents by distributing healthy food through a network of over 200 food pantries, soup kitchens and other community organizations across Alameda County — from Berkeley to Fremont, Oakland to Livermore.

Ruling year info

1985

Principal Officer

Ms. Suzan Bateson

Main address

PO Box 2599

Oakland, CA 94614 USA

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EIN

94-2960297

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In Alameda County, 1 in 5 residents turn to the food bank. The high cost of living in the Bay Area continues to rise, and wages are not keeping up. In fact, research shows it takes a family of four $81,621 to meet the basics in the Oakland metro area. Yet 65 percent of our clients have incomes less than $28,290. Many community members must make impossible choices between food and housing, food and utility bills, even food and medicine. Hunger also harms health. Twenty percent of our clients' households include at least one member with diabetes, and 39 percent have a member with high blood pressure.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Distribution

Alameda County Community Food Bank distributes more than 30 million pounds of healthy food – the equivalent of 28 million meals – to our community annually. Farm-fresh fruits and vegetables – cornerstones of a healthy diet, yet scarce in low-income neighborhoods – make up more than half of the food we provide. Our food distribution programs are as follows:

A countywide network of more than 270 member agencies – food pantries, soup kitchens and other community organizations – nourish our community through the distribution of fresh produce, healthy staples, and hot meals.

Our Mobile Pantry Program travels to community sites (such as schools and churches), offering farmer’s market-style distributions where families handpick the foods that best meet their preferences and needs.

Our Children's BackPack Program provides children who rely on free and reduced-price school meals with bags of nutritious food to sustain them over the weekends. When they return to school on Monday, they’re ready to learn and play.

Our School-Based Pantry Program establishes permanent, on-site food pantries at schools - ranging from elementary to college - throughout our community. The pantries empower students with the flexibility and resources to help them learn and succeed.

We partner with health care providers to identify food insecurity in patients and provide food resources in order to improve general health and help prevent diet-related illnesses, such as diabetes.

Population(s) Served

Our Food Bank's toll-free, Emergency Food Helpline (1-800-870-3663) is among the busiest and most efficient in California. Callers are connected to a same-day source of emergency food – a bag of free groceries or a hot meal – located close to their homes. Our team of multi-lingual staff and volunteer operators assist an average of 2,000 households every month.

Population(s) Served

Our Nutrition Program offers tips, cooking classes, healthy recipes and demonstrations using foods we commonly provide. Our team can regularly be spotted at member agencies, Mobile Pantries and other community sites helping our neighbors learn about nutrition, how to maximize the food they receive from us, and shopping for and preparing healthy food on a budget.

Population(s) Served

Partnering with legislators in local, state and federal government, our Advocacy Department is California’s most aggressive and one of the nation’s most accomplished. Our efforts have been instrumental in creating and advocating for landmark legislation benefitting our community’s most vulnerable.

Population(s) Served

CalFresh (SNAP/food stamps) Outreach connects low-income families with government nutrition benefits – the first line of defense against hunger. A pioneer in this work, our multi-lingual outreach team has an excellent application approval rating, is responsible for generating tens of millions of dollars in local economic stimulus, and serves as the blueprint for similar programs at food banks nationwide.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Four Star Rating 2009

Charity Navigator

Four Star Ranking 2007

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Four Star Ranking 2008

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Four Star Ranking 2010

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Four Star Ranking 2011

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Four Star Ranking 2012

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Four Star Ranking 2013

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Four Star Ranking 2014

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Four Star Ranking 2015

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Four Star Ranking 2016

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Four Star Ranking 2017

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Four Star Ranking 2018

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Four Star Ranking 2019

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Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In fiscal year 2019, ACCFB’s distributed pounds decreased slightly by 1%, due in part to lower food donations and, more nutrient dense foods such as leafy greens which weigh less.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our plan is to increase the number of meals that the Food Bank and government programs provide so that every food insecure child and adult in Alameda County will have access to one meal each day, a total of 90 million meals annually by FY18. We must develop and grow our resources, infrastructure and partnerships. We will remain committed to effecting long-term solutions by pursuing policy and systems-change solutions. Beyond strengthening nutrition programs, we seek and envision a robust safety-net that ultimately reduces the number of people who lack resources for food.

By FY18 we will distribute 90 million meals annually so that 241,860 food insecure children, adults and seniors in Alameda County are assured one nutritious meal a day. We continually develop our resources to manage internal and network agency infrastructure growth and innovation. We work to bring partners to the table and engage them to jointly leverage government resources to end hunger in our county.

Through food acquisition, distribution and programming, we will:
Distribute enough food for 28.9 million meals by FY18 by
• Increasing food distribution by 5.5% annually
• Maintaining our commitment to distributing high nutrient value foods

Through Cal Fresh application assistance, we will:
Connect enough households to CalFresh to provide 4.6 million meals by FY18 by
• Leveraging partnerships to maximize Food Bank resources
• Increasing the number of completed CalFresh applications sent to the county by 6% annually

Through leading our community in systems change through partnerships, lobbying and community organizing, we will:
Collectively provide up to 56.8 million additional meals through government nutrition program enrollment by:
• Seeking to achieve full participation in federal nutrition programs among eligible Alameda County residents
• Building a movement to end hunger by engaging the community in solutions
• Maximizing all safety-net resources to reduce the number of people who do not have resources for food

Through ongoing and strategic cultivation of existing and developing resources, we will:
Increase our capacity to lead our network and our community by
• Raising more individual and institutional funding, a 30% increase over life of plan
• Increasing internal infrastructure's (people and facility) capacity to meet strategic goals
• Building the capacity, ability and services of our member agency network
• Ensuring that our board of directors has the support and tools necessary to lead
• Tracking and communicating progress towards our strategic plan goals; recommending adjustments as needed

The Food Bank's three core programs – Food Acquisition and Distribution, CalFresh Outreach, and Advocacy – work in concert to provide short- , mid- and long term food assistance and resources to children and adults in Alameda County. Our CalFresh outreach program began in 2002, dedicating one half of a helpline employee's hours. Today our staff numbers 13 outreach employees, who provide application assistance at our facility and in the field daily. Advocacy and policy work is focused on a grassroots as well as grass tops approach. Our goal is to have our staff, volunteer advocates and community members actively engage and participate with decision makers and to have our collective efforts influence government policy.

Our work is founded upon this principle: Food is a basic human right.

This core belief guides us every day in responding to our community's immediate nutritional needs.

We provided the equivalent of 28 million meals in FY16. By year-end, we were distributing a milestone 3 million pounds of food per month. Fresh fruits and vegetables made up 58 percent of the food we provided.

At the center of our efforts is a committed network of over 200 partner agencies offering hunger relief and other critical services. These agencies provide tangibles, like shelter and job skills, as well as intangibles, like compassion and dignity.

Our own direct distribution programs grew significantly to augment our agency network. Our Mobile Pantry truck now makes stops every weekday and sets up free farmers' markets at 15 neighborhood sites including schools, parks, and affordable living communities.

This distribution network is leading the local movement to reduce food waste. Our Grocery Rescue program diverted 3.6 million pounds of healthy food to our clients' cupboards and refrigerators, instead of a landfill—20 percent growth over last fiscal year.

Finally, we ensure our community has food for today and tomorrow. Through our close partnership with Alameda County Social Services Agency, our CalFresh Outreach department assisted in the submission of 4,438 applications for CalFresh (food stamps). These applications resulted in 4.6 million meals and an estimated $24.6 million economic impact to our local economy.

Financials

ALAMEDA COUNTY COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ALAMEDA COUNTY COMMUNITY FOOD BANK

Board of directors
as of 11/20/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ted Monk

Sodexo School Services

Tarang Amin

e.l.f. Cosmetics

Doug Elefant

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Kenneth Porter

Greater New Beginnings

Teena Massingill

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Chuck Reinhard

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Dawn Willoughby

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Jennifer Cabalquinto

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Joel Dickson

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Jon Fieldman

Angie's Popcorn/Boom Chicka Pop

Krista Lucchesi

Mercy Brown Bag Program

Beth Strachan

Metropolitan Group

Sydney Firestone

Deloitte FAS LLP (Retired)

Sara Webber

Berkeley Food Network

Robert Andersen

Xperi Corporation

Sayed Darwish

Attorney

Chris Gaither

Apple

Jan Markwart

Horizon Services, Inc.