VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Your Means to a Friend

aka VHS   |   Pleasanton, CA   |  www.valleyhumane.org

Mission

Valley Humane Society (VHS) creates brighter futures for cats and dogs by encouraging and strengthening the bond between people and pets. VHS rescues and rehabilitates companion animals, champions responsible caretaking, shares pets' soothing affections with people in need of comfort, and supports and preserves existing pet-guardian relationships.

Notes from the nonprofit

If flexibility was the key to surviving 2020, last year demanded persistence. Throughout 2021, thanks to your generosity and the support of volunteers and community partners, Valley Humane Society successfully met many challenges facing pets and people in our community. The record pace of adoptions seen in 2020 abated last year, and while the number of pets being surrendered to shelters remained low (contrary to news stories), the lack of adopters presented new challenges. Valley Humane remained focused on supporting homeless pets, while continuing to expand services keeping pets with their families and out of shelters. The AniMeals pet food pantry maintained record levels of meal provision, while our fee-free Home to Home program allowed animals to rehome directly from guardian to guardian. This year we also proudly reported our first spay/neuter milestone, with nearly 1500 adoptable dogs and cats altered.

Ruling year info

1987

President

Melanie Sadek

Main address

3670 Nevada Street

Pleasanton, CA 94566 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-3038202

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Adoption (P31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Valley Humane Society strives to ensure all cats and dogs are in homes with families who care for the animals. Valley Humane Society is addressing the issues of homeless dogs and cats, people seeking various experiences of the human/animal bond, including adoption, and assisting those struggling to keep pets in their homes before they make the decision to relinquish the pets to a shelter.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Canine Comfort Pet Therapy.

The relationship between pets and people has immeasurable value on our emotional and physical health. Through Canine Comfort Pet Therapy, Valley Humane Society brings animals to places other pets can’t go, sharing the unconditional love that pets offer and creating opportunities for people to experience the love of a pet. Sharing their own beloved companions, VHS Canine Comfort Pet Therapy volunteers team up with their dogs to improve the lives of others through our community in two primary ways:
Paws to Heal provides therapeutic pet visitation to medical facilities, schools and retirement homes throughout the Tri-Valley.
Paws to Read encourages a love of animals and improves the reading skills of children in cooperation with local libraries and schools.
Canine Comfort Pet Therapy teams also have opportunities to participate in fundraising events, children’s camps, and humane education programs. Find out how you can make a difference with your dog!

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

The relationship between pets and people has immeasurable value on our emotional and physical health. Through Canine Comfort Pet Therapy, Valley Humane Society brings animals to places other pets can’t go, sharing the unconditional love that pets offer and creating opportunities for people to experience the love of a pet. Sharing their own beloved companions, VHS Canine Comfort Pet Therapy volunteers team up with their dogs to improve the lives of others through our community in two primary ways:

Paws to Heal provides therapeutic pet visitation to medical facilities, schools and retirement homes throughout the Tri-Valley.

Paws to Read encourages a love of animals and improves the reading skills of children in cooperation with local libraries and schools.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Companion animals are a vital part of the healthy emotional development of children. Our humane education programs teach respect for all life using enriching activities and hands-on experiences. Children are able to explore and develop character traits like empathy, kindness, compassion, trust, mindfulness, respect, and responsibility, resulting in:

A stronger bond with animals, which is proven to create better human relationships
The desire to become a responsible pet guardian
A reduction in the number of animals that are abused, neglected, abandoned, or surrendered to animal shelters
A reduction in bullying and violence in families, schools, and communities

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

We would much rather see pets in homes than in shelters. That’s why Valley Humane Society operates AniMeals, a pet food pantry that provides regular free meals for the dogs and cats of seniors and low-income families.

Donations of wet or dry dog and cat food are always accepted, even if opened or recently expired, and can be dropped off at VHS during open hours. Pet-related items such as litter, treats, and toys are also needed.

Pet food distribution takes places through partnerships with local food banks.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

Home to Home helps pets stay out of shelters. It is a unique, direct-to-adopter tool for pet guardians looking to re-home their animals. In just a few simple steps, pets can find a loving new home without ever seeing the inside of a shelter. It’s free to use for both guardians and adopters, and gives animals needing a new home the best of both worlds: their current guardian can find the best fit, and their adopter can learn all about their personality and preferences first-hand. It’s a win-win for pets! www.home-home.org

Population(s) Served
Adults

Those who know the love and support of a pet can understand how important that relationship becomes to individuals in hospice care. Through a unique partnership with Hope Hospice, VHS allows patients to enjoy the loving company and comfort of their beloved cats and dogs for as long as possible by providing in-home pet care during this critical time. Then, if no other family member is able to assume guardianship of an animal once the patient dies, VHS takes that pet into our adoption system to find a new forever home.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Adults

Working with area public shelters, Valley Humane Society transfers in animals from these shelters with the goal to place these animals in loving homes through adoption.

Valley Humane provides the requisite medical care and behavioral assessments to aid adoptions.

The area shelters in the Tri-Valley area, and our adoptions are open in Alameda and surrounding counties.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Non Profit of the Year 2009

City of Pleasanton

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

AniMeals

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of pet meals distributed annually

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Adoption Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We measure the number of UNIQUE animal adoptions. For example, if an adopted animal is returned to the shelter, for whatever reason, and then is adopted again, we count that animal as only 1 adoption.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Valley Humane Society transfers in dogs and cats from public shelters. Most require spay/neuter surgery prior to adoption. In 2020, an additional 300 surgeries were performed for other rescue groups.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Adoption Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We measure this record according to the annual Asilomar report that Valley Humane Society provides. "Rescued" is being defined for our purposes as any dog or cat that is transferred to our care.

Number of animals euthanized

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of animals euthanized. The organization follows Asilomar standards regardin the reason an animal is euthanized. Those reasons are provided in our annual reports.

Number of site visits by dog-and-handler teams.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Canine Comfort Pet Therapy.

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are the number of active canine comfort teams that are making visits to various facilities in the Tri-Valley area.

Number of people that received canine comfort care through schools, reading programs, adult living-assisted facilities, companies and hospitals.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Canine Comfort Pet Therapy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Starting March 13, 2020, site visits by canine comfort teams stopped due to Covid-19 orders and concerns. In-person meetings resumed in 2021 with some video/virtual sessions continuing.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Valley Humane Society has three goals that address this issue:

1) Increase the number of animals supported and the new homes found each year;

2) Reduce the time and need for animals to be at Valley Humane Society’s shelter (i.e., decrease the length of stay);

3) Provide resources to pet owners in the community, so companion animals can remain in a loving home; and

4) Strengthen the human/animal bond by providing a variety of opportunities for people and animals to engage in positive interactions.

1) Valley Humane Society has forged strong collaborative relationships with seven public shelters in Alameda and Contra Costa County. Valley Humane Society also works closely with Stockton Animal Services. Through these relationships, Valley Humane Society regularly visits these facilities to help transfer animals, who need the care and adoption services, to Valley Humane Society’s shelter.

Once in Valley Humane Society’s care, cats and dogs are provided medical care, including age appropriate vaccinations, medical interventions, spay/neuter surgery, microchipping, and emotional support. Once approved for adoption, new homes are found through social media channels, VHS’ network of pet fosters as well as listings through pet adoption websites.

Valley Humane Society’s adoption program utilizes a relatively new concept of “adopter’s welcome”. Adopter’s provide answers to open-ended question. Rather than looking for reasons not to adopt to a potential pet owner, Valley Humane Society looks to reduce barriers to adoption. This helps streamline the adoption process whereby staff can assist the new pet owner with issues that may arise (e.g., first-time cat owner, special needs animal, etc.).


2) Valley Humane Society’s two main strategies for reducing the “length of stay” for animals at Valley Humane Society’s shelter are:

a. Employment of supply-chain strategies that optimizes intake, spay/neuter surgeries and each animal’s availability for adoption. By developing a plan that focuses on advance scheduling based on each animal’s medical and behavioral needs, there is a significant reduction of animals waiting in the shelter for procedures, programs or recovery time.

b. To better assist community members who may need to rehome their beloved pets, Valley Humane provides a free service called Home to Home. Pet owners post profiles of their pets, which has the same effect as traditional pet adoption websites. The current owner screens potential homes themselves. This allows animals to stay with their owners and move directly to a new home, never requiring the animal to spend any time in a shelter.

Conceptually, Home to Home employs a different set of tasks and processes for shelter staff, but allows them to interact with current pet owners, in the community, who are having issues that may result in the animal being surrendered to a shelter. Sometimes, the owner realizes that, with some additional resources, they can keep their pet.

3) Valley Humane employs several strategies to provide key resources that allow pet owners to keep and provide for their pets.
a. Valley Humane Society runs a program called AniMeals, which provides pet food and supplies to community members whose most immediate need is to feed themselves and their pets. Working with area food banks that are providing food to people, AniMeals can provide its skilled staff and volunteers without burdening Food Banks and easing the burden of people to travel to multiple distribution centers

Valley Humane Society is able to achieve its goals related to the issue of pet homelessness because of the following:

A strong volunteer network; physical shelter; and staff.

Each capability allows Valley Humane Society to provide exceptional care to our animals as well as to the people who are struggling to keep their pet in their home. Each animal who enters the shelter is treated individually with custom assessments and treatment plans.

Employing a medical team that includes two veterinarians allows Valley Humane Society to address all treatable medical conditions and prepare the animals for their new forever home. Valley Humane Society's operations and adoption team members watch for any behavioral issues that may arise during the animal’s stay at the shelter. With a staff trained in fear-free sheltering techniques, staff and volunteers work on a plan of action for each animal.

Valley Humane Society’s marketing team and adoption program work collaboratively to allow animals to move through the various stages of the organization and into new homes. This team also keeps our supporters engaged so people in our community know they can turn to Valley Humane Society in times of need.

Valley Humane Society's capabilities reflect our values of compassion, collaboration and integrity. Every animal and person that comes to our shelter is treated with kindness with the understanding that the organization's goals address both pets and people. These capabilities are performed as an experienced team, including partnering with external resources such as shelters and veterinarian practices. These capabilities underscore the Valley Humane Society's value of providing its programs and services with honesty and integrity.

Lastly, Valley Humane Society has an exceptional group of staff and volunteers that provide the comfort, care and compassion to the pets and people. Thanks to private donations and support, Valley Humane Society has maintained the financial stability to carry address the above-stated issue.

Valley Humane Society is able to achieve its goals related strengthening the human/animal bond because of the following capabilities:

Valley Humane Society utilizes a single staff member to help coordinate programming for children. This includes scout workshops, junior volunteer opportunities, camps, classroom visits, and team projects. The Canine Comfort Pet Therapy program has 200 pet therapy handlers who are certified through Valley Humane Society's program. The organization coordinates all visits and works directly to facilities to ensure a safe environment for handler/dog teams and those that are meeting with these teams.

1a. From 2017-2029, annual animal adoptions increased each year by at least 10% . In 2021, 626 adoptions took place. This was a decrease from 2020, which was the result of a nationwide reduction in potential adopters after a record adoption rate in 2020.

1b. From 2019-2021, the save rate at public shelters in the Tri-Valley increased.

2a. In 2021, overall length of stay for animals increased slightly over 2020.

2b. In 2021, length of stay increased/decreased for the following animal types from 2020:
i. Cats – increased 2.6%
ii. Dogs – increased 3.1%
iii. Puppies – decreased 9.9%

2c. In 2021, Home to Home listings increased 32% from 2020, and positive outcomes (adoptions) through Home to Home increased by 27% as well.

3a. In 2021, Valley Humane Society’s AniMeals program distributed over 466,363 animal meals, which was a nearly a 33% increase from 2021. Since 2019, Valley Humane Society has seen a 388% increase in pet food distribution.

4a. In 2020, Humane Education provided opportunities to 11,222, which was an increase from the prior two years. Social distancing and stay at home orders are reasons for this decline from the previous year (7,000 children).

4b. With the resurgence of in-person gatherings in 2021, while continuing to use video conferencing, over 5,432 hours were logged by canine comfort volunteers providing comfort and companionship at community schools, assisted living facilities, companies and public libraries.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    When a recent first-time adopter seem puzzled by some open-ended questions regarding their living space, the organization added some context, both in the adoption application, the talking points for our adoption counselors, and in our resource guide as to what to look for if their cat exhibits some particular behavior. We explicitly state that question and its response should not be seen as a barrier, but a point of conversation we can have on how to work with the adopter's living space as they bring a new companion animal into their home.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Board of directors
as of 5/12/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sandra Gardiner

Penelope Tamm

Retired, Pleasanton PD

Clyde Ogata

Managing Tax Counsel/Chevron Corporation

Susan Capello

Attorney, Intel

Joe Streng

Director, Robert Half International

Brian Joyce

CPA

Phil Vermont

Partner, Randick O’Dea Tooliatos Vermont & Sargent

Sandra Gardiner

EVP & CFO, Pulse Biosciences

Lori Rice

Julie Wolfe

Senior Manager, Glassdoor

Heidi White

Senior VP, Fineman PR

Gina Piper

Founder, Elation Real Estate

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/08/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.