Hispanics In Philanthropy

aka HIP   |   Oakland, CA   |  www.hiponline.org

Mission

Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) is on a mission to strengthen Latino leadership, influence and equity by leveraging philanthropic resources, and doing so with an unwavering focus on social justice and shared prosperity across the Americas.

Ruling year info

1987

President and CEO

Ana Marie Argilagos

Main address

414 13th Street Suite 200

Oakland, CA 94612 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-3040607

NTEE code info

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Membership

As the voice for the Latino community, Hispanics in Philanthropy works to increase resources for the Latino and Latin American civil sector by generating investments, Latino participation, and leadership in the field of philanthropy. We provide our members with the products and services they need in order to do their best work. To this end, HIP’s network gives members multiple opportunities t connect with foundations, grantmaking institutions and non-profits; gain access to key philanthropy decision makers, conference briefings, research publications, and professional development programs; and become involved in substantive discussions about effective ways to improve the lives of Latinos everywhere.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The PowerUp Fund leverages philanthropic dollars against private capital to build power and spur economic growth for Latino communities across the U.S. and the Caribbean.

We provide comprehensive access to capital for Latino-led enterprises.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Economically disadvantaged people

Through our mid-career Latinx Líderes program, HIP has served over 150 individuals since 2016. This interactive career development and networking program empowers a new generation of Latinos to move into positions of power and influence to change our systems to support the Latino community to live to its fullest potential. HIP’s leadership work also extends to the top levels of philanthropy through engagement of Latino trustees to establish a common agenda for moving the needle on diversity and on increasing funding for Latino-focused programs.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Adults

In 2014 HIP launched HIPGive.org, the only crowdfunding platform and online hub for Latino social impact and philanthropy within the Americas. HIPGive has channeled over $2 million to over 750 Latino-lead projects around the country and 11 other countries in Latin America.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Activists

Over the past half a decade, HIP has grown its Gender Equity Program from a segmented $100,000 grantmaking portfolio to a multi-million dollar strategic Impact Area that addresses intersectional issues from human trafficking to reproductive rights, with funding from a half dozen major international foundations. In addition to providing flexible and long-term grantmaking, HIP strengthens grantees’ organizational and collective capacities as women’s rights advocates.

HIP constantly innovates to better serve its partners: in 2014, it launched HIPGive.org, the only bilingual crowdfunding platform focused on Latino nonprofit projects. Since 2016, HIPGive’s annual #NoMasTrata and #GOMujeres campaigns have channeled more than $200,000 USD to nonprofits addressing gender equity issues.

HIP directs funder attention to the issues most pertinent to the Latino community, including through reports, webinars and in-person convenings. Recent gender equity reports include: “Investing in Midwifery: a Route to Reduce Gender Inequality” (2018), “The First Stitch: Advancing the Wellbeing of Women Workers in Mexico’s Fashion Sector” (2018), “Gender Norms: A Key to Improving Outcomes Among Young Latinas” (2017), and “A Look at Human Trafficking from the Perspective of CSOs” (2017).

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Victims and oppressed people

Through HIP’s Transnational Migration and Forced Displacement Program, HIP has implemented a comprehensive response on both sides of the border, including grantmaking, a communications campaign centered around convening and educating funders as well as counteracting an increasingly predominant xenophobic, anti-immigrant narrative. This work is led by a transnational team working across Mexico, Central America and the U.S. and includes the Central America and Mexico Migration Alliance (CAMMINA) as well as issue-linked initiatives such as our Family Unity Fund, COVID-19 Migration Rapid Response Fund, and #VenezuelansMovingForward.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
People of Latin American descent

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount raised for nonprofits from individual donors on HIPGive.org

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HIPGive

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individual donors on HIPGive

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent

Related Program

HIPGive

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Líderes Program participants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent

Related Program

Líderes Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Membership

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of foundation and nonprofit organizational members of HIP. Learn more at hiponline.org/members

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

HIP exists with the goal to strengthen and increase Latino leadership, influence, and equity by leveraging philanthropic resources throughout the U.S., Latin America, and the Caribean. HIP understands the complexities of social issues to increase prosperity and social justice across the Americas and the Caribean can only be measured over time and must be targeted to specific efforts within each strategy, as discussed below.

Our vision is for Latinos to achieve power, social justice and shared prosperity across the Americas. HIP’s organizational values shape its culture and act as a filter and compass for internal and external decision-making and priority-setting: our core values are equity (the ability to participate, prosper and reach their full potential), leadership (the ability to mobilize others and work together for social and economic justice) and voice (creating a philanthropic sector that reflects, respects, responds, and resources communities of color)—within a transnational mindset.

HIP's programs are organized around four institutional strategies:
1) Building Latino Power by growing Latino leadership in the social sector, with a focus on increasing representation at the C-suite and Trustee levels;
2) Democratizing Philanthropy through engaging individual philanthropists, to encourage pathways for giving outside of traditional philanthropy (including crowdfunding and micro-giving);
3) Mobilizing Bigger and Better Resources for Latino communities, by advocating for greater philanthropic investment and facilitating strategic grantmaking initiatives; and
4) Channeling Latino influence and thought leadership, to promote narrative change.

Hispanics in Philanthropy works to advance Latinx leadership, equity and voice through a combination of strategies that rely on building strong partnerships between philanthropy and Latinx communities. To that end, HIP has built an extensive national network of funders and nonprofits committed to advancing the health and well-being of Latinx families across the Americas.

Since 2000, we have partnered with hundreds of funders to disburse tens of millions of dollars in grants to nonprofits, as well as providing key capacity-building trainings that make them stronger and more effective agents of change. Through regional funding collaboratives that have supported a wide variety of grassroots nonprofits and through issue-focused initiatives including Civic Participation, Migration and Forced Displacement, Gender Equity, and Leadership, HIP has partnered with prominent funders to bring more resources to organizations working to address the myriad issues that contribute to community well-being.

HIP is a trusted convener and champion of building power in Latinx communities. Leveraging its experience in gathering diverse stakeholders and in spotlighting critical issues in our community, HIP convenes funders and allies to promote information sharing, mobilize resources, and encourage collaborative action. This work includes not just programming as described above, but also the impact of our annual leadership conference, convenings of grantee partners and stakeholders, local events for members and allies, and the Líderes Program, which prepares mid-career Latinx philanthropy professionals to advance to senior leadership positions, and to increase their agency and ability to make change. Participants gain knowledge, learn new practices, and build relationships within a network that supports their ability to advance and thrive.

Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) was founded in 1983 by a group of three Latino foundation professionals looking to promote stronger partnerships between organized philanthropy and Latino communities. Since then, HIP has built an extensive national network of funders and nonprofits committed to advancing the health and well-being of Latino children and families across the country and in Latin America.

Since 2000, we have partnered with more than 175 funders to invest $55 million in grants to over 600 nonprofits, as well as providing key capacity-building trainings that make them stronger and more effective agents of change. Through regional funding collaboratives that have supported a wide variety of grassroots nonprofits and through issue-focused initiatives including Education, Migration and Forced Displacement, Gender Equity, and Leadership, HIP has partnered with prominent funders to bring more resources to organizations working to address the myriad of issues that contribute to the health of a community.

Through our mid-career Latinx Líderes program, HIP has served over 150 individuals since 2016. This interactive career development and networking program empowers a new generation of Latinos to move into positions of power and influence to change our systems to support the Latino community to live to its fullest potential. HIP’s leadership work also extends to the top levels of philanthropy through engagement of Latino trustees to establish a common agenda for moving the needle on diversity and on increasing funding for Latino-focused programs.

Further, in our efforts to increase giving to and by Hispanics, in 2014 HIP launched HIPGive, the only crowdfunding platform and online hub for Latino social impact and philanthropy within the Americas. HIPGive has channeled over $2 million to over 750 Latino-lead projects around the country and 11 other countries in Latin America.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Although HIP does not directly provide services, we do provide support to our grantees in various ways: capacity building; direct funds; access to networks; access to key resources designed for them and for their staff to change the narrative on immigrants and Latinx; racial equity trainings; and support in fundraising through our HIPGive platform and opportunities to network with funders.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Hispanics In Philanthropy
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Hispanics In Philanthropy

Board of directors
as of 12/13/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Efrain Escobedo

California Community Foundation


Board co-chair

Roy Cosme

Arcos Communications

Miguel Bustos

GLIDE

Luz Vega-Marquis

Marguerite Casey Foundation

Mary Skelton Roberts

Barr Foundation

Cynthia Rivera Weissblum

Edwin Gould Foundation

Roy Cosme

Arcos Communications

Elizabeth Campbell

Rockefeller Brothers Fund

Julio Copo Terrés

Basham, Ringe y Correa, S.C.

Hector Mujica

Google.org

Shawn Escoffery

Roy and Patricia Disney Family Foundation

Hilda Polanco

Fiscal Management Associates

Christine Switzer

Fidelity Charitable

Sam Zamarripa

Intent Solutions

Ana Marie Argilagos

Hispanics in Philanthropy

Elisa Arévalo

Retired Corporate Vice President

Diana Campoamor

Nuestra América Fund

Jennifer Chavez Rubio

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Marco Davis

Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI)

Herman Gallegos

Retired Corporate and Foundation Director

Jonathan Jayes-Green

Marguerite Casey Foundation

Tony Mestres

Truveta

Glenda Monterroza

Kaiser Permanente

Icela Pelayo

W.K. Kellogg Foundation

Maria del Socorro Pesqueira

Healthy Communities Foundation

Raul Moas

Knight Foundation

Sam Zamarripa

Mundo Hispanico

Luz Vega-Marquis

Retired Foundation President

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/30/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/13/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.