Store to Door

Groceries and more, a friend at your door!

Portland, OR   |  www.storetodooroforegon.org

Mission

Store to Door supports independent living for Portland area seniors and people with disabilities by providing an affordable, personal, volunteer-based grocery shopping and delivery service.

Our vision is that the Portland area will be a community where all seniors and people with disabilities are nourished, included and can age with dignity in the setting of their own choice.

Store to Door serves most of Multnomah County and parts of Washington County.

Ruling year info

1994

Executive Director

Mark P Fulop MA, MPH

Main address

7730 SW 31st Ave.

Portland, OR 97219 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-3105555

NTEE code info

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Personal Social Services (P50)

Health Support Services (E60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Store to Door’s grocery delivery and friendly visitation program is designed to meet the nutritional and social needs of seniors and people living with disabilities who live alone and on limited incomes, so that they can safely age in the setting of their own choosing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Store to Door

Store to Door leverages the power of volunteers and community partnerships to provide an efficient, effective grocery shopping and delivery service. Our service is unique to Oregon, and is the preferred grocery shopping and delivery service of Multnomah County Aging, Disability & Veterans Services. We partner with Multnomah County to serve people who qualify for Oregon Project Independence (assistive services for adults with disabilities) and the Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps).We are the only program in Oregon authorized to use clients’ SNAP benefits on their behalf. Without our program, homebound seniors would not have access to this lifesaving food security benefit.

With our personalized service, we are uniquely equipped to identify and respond to the health and safety concerns of this elder population. Our volunteers and staff participate in the County’s Gatekeeper Program, an organized outreach effort designed to identify, refer, and respond to at-risk seniors and people with disabilities who live independently. More than just a delivery service, we act as a bridge between homebound elders and the community, encouraging self-advocacy; engaging family, case workers, health care workers, apartment managers, or Adult Protective Services when needed; and making referrals for additional low-cost or no-cost supportive services provided by our network of community partners that help our clients safely maintain their self-sufficiency, dignity, and health and well-being.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors

Related Program

Store to Door

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Note: Client tracking method changed after 2020.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Store to Door

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Store to Door

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goals of our program are to help vulnerable seniors and adults living with disabilities: 1) maintain their independence; 2) increase their social supports and 3) access additional services that support aging-in-place.

We have set the following objectives to measure our outcomes in 2022:
1) Serve at least 740 unduplicated individuals, completing 15,500 deliveries.
2) Engage at least 1,250 volunteers who give 21,200 hours of service.
3) 97% of clients will report that our service helps them maintain independence.
4) 97% of clients will report feeling more socially supported after enrolling in our program.
5) 97% of clients will report that Store to Door meets their needs for grocery shopping and delivery.
6) 15% of clients will self-identify as Black, Indigenous, or Persons of Color.

We have set the following strategic goals to accommodate our program growth:
a) Increase delivery capacity by process analysis, technology enhancements and applying principles of continuous improvement.
b) Increase client outreach to those who are underrepresented and need us the most to ensure that at least 15% of our client base is racially diverse.
c) Expand our capacity to serve more clients by increasing staff and physical space to meet service provision growth.

Store to Door continues to work towards controlled growth that will enable us to make our service available to everyone who needs it. We are committed to equity, diversity, and inclusion in every facet of our agency, and are actively addressing these issues in our strategic plan with the full support of our staff and board of directors.

We consistently meet or exceed our program outcomes, and have steadily grown our donor base and foundation and corporate support. The fact that 96% of clients said that our service helps them maintain their independence and 95% of clients reported feeling more socially supported after enrolling in our program last year attests to the strength of both our staff and volunteer force.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Store to Door has expanded and adapted our program to better meet the increased need experienced by members of our community. Recent enhancements to our program have greatly contributed to our success and set us up to continue to expand our reach:
1. We have regularly set new records for weekly delivery totals, engaging volunteer help for a record 21,183 in 2021 hours despite the challenges of the global pandemic.
2. We have refocused our DEI work, and our DEI Committee remains committed to ensuring equitable access to our service for all those in need.
3. We launched our own Free Food Box program in 2021, in order to offer increased support to those most in need.
4. In 2020, we founded a Friendly Caller program to provide informal friend connections to clients each week, in order to further combat social isolation.
5. In the absence of in-person fundraising events, we have successfully shifted to incorporate online fundraising campaigns multiple times annually in order to support our program work.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Store to Door delivers to homebound seniors and adults living with disabilities across the Portland Metro area.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    During the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, we heard regularly from clients that they were experiencing increased loneliness and social isolation, and were missing some of the regular personal connection that was made more difficult as a result of the pandemic. In response, we launched our weekly 'Friendly Caller' program. Each week, a large corps of volunteers call interested clients for an informal check-in and chat. With the same caller each week, clients can form a relationship with their volunteer. Volunteers are trained and prepared to refer clients to appropriate social services, and are able to pay attention to clients' physical, mental, and emotional well-being during their weekly chats.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Continuing to incorporate client feedback in multiple ways has allowed us to keep those we serve centered in the program work that we do--and to make decisions broadly with those clients in mind!

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Store to Door
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Store to Door

Board of directors
as of 02/04/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Michael Beaty

XPO Logistics

Michael Brine

Fred Meyer

Michael Beaty

XPO Logistics

Marv Kuperstein

Community Volunteer

Magnus McDowell

Us Bank

Ana Munoz Romero

Concordia University

John Van Dinter

Columbia Presbyterian Church

Therese Andersen

Duos

Tony Rapp

Cambia Health Solutions

Jay Rafter

Stoel Rives LLP (Retired)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/4/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/04/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.