Housing, Shelter

Imagine Housing

Building Eastside Communities

aka Imagine Housing

Kirkland, WA

Mission

Imagine Housing develops affordable housing, builds welcoming communities and fosters vibrant futures.

Ruling Year

1994

CEO

Villette Nolon

Main Address

10604 NE 38th Place Suite 215

Kirkland, WA 98033 USA

Formerly Known As

Saint Andrew's Housing Group

Keywords

Affordable housing, housing, King County, Washington, Bellevue, Kirkland, Mercer Island, Issaquah, Transitional, Transitional Housing, Housing, Veteran, Senior Citizen

EIN

94-3110312

 Number

4478127545

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

Senior Citizens' Housing/Retirement Communities (L22)

Housing Expense Reduction Support, Rent Assistance (L82)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

For 32 years, Imagine Housing has been providing permanent affordable housing to address the growing issues of homelessness, displacement, and housing instability. As the leading nonprofit developer on the Eastside, we have built and now own and manage 15 communities, providing 639 homes to 1,423 residents. However, the need for this work continues to grow. Since 2008, the cost of housing in East King County has risen faster than average incomes. The disparity between median income and median housing prices has grown and the need for permanent affordable rental housing has skyrocketed. HUD specifies that for housing to be considered affordable, it should cost a household no more than 30% of their adjusted annual income. Yet, in 2015, 34% of East King County households were considered cost-burdened and trends suggest this percentage has most likely increased. This cost burden is deeply impacting people throughout our community, creating a ripple effect for our society as a whole.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Supportive Services

Affordable Housing

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified,

Homeless people

Related program

Affordable Housing

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

245 apartments were housing individuals coming directly from homelessness

Number of low-income units in market-rate neighborhood

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified,

Children and youth (0-19 years),

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Affordable Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

A total of 649 affordable apartment homes were provided for seniors, veterans, low-income families and former foster youth.

Number of low-income families housed in affordable, well-maintained units as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Families,

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Affordable Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

133 families were provided with safe, stable and affordable housing

Number of veterans provided with an affordable, safe and permanant apartment home

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Veterans

Related program

Affordable Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

88 veterans were provided with a safe, permanent and affordable place to live

Number of seniors that were provided safe, affordable and permanent housing

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens

Related program

Affordable Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

272 seniors were provided with safe, affordable and permanent housing

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Every January, we develop a set of goals for the organization, guided by the strategic plan that will help us meet our goal of providing 2,400 people with 1,000 affordable homes by 2022. We are working hard to build more units as quickly as feasible in response to the growing housing crisis. We keep a full pipeline and have a running tally of the number of units in our pipeline for the next 1-3 years. For 2020, our goal is to identify 2-3 new project possibilities to acquire or develop. We also are working to strengthen and enhance our support services that are provided to the residents at each apartment community.

The Imagine Housing team is highly sensitive to the major economic trends driving the need for affordable housing, as well as the factors that affect housing providers’ ability to increase the supply of housing. We developed a 5-year plan in 2010, and refreshed it in 2014 and 2016 in response to market needs and a rapidly changing regional economic environment. On the demand side, an influx of highly paid high-tech employees has pushed housing prices to unparalleled heights, while salaries for other workers have risen only slightly or remained flat. On the supply side, public funding has declined while the competition for land has made development more expensive than ever. The result is that people are being priced out of their homes, without adequate support or homelessness prevention programs, and King County saw a 67% increase in unsheltered homelessness from 2015 - 2018. Our strategic goal is to increase our portfolio by affordable units by 361 units by the end of 2022. We will continue to focus on deeply affordable housing (affordable to 0-50% AMI), however, available public funds are severely limited, and we will also explore opportunities to add workforce housing affordable to households earning up to 80% AMI. While still affordable and filling a critical gap in the housing market, these units generate higher rents and contribute to the financial strength of the organization, while allowing us to invest more resources in homes for the lowest income and highest need residents. Workforce housing requires private funds to fill a gap left by a lower contribution of public funds. Our strategy is to fill the gap with social impact investment capital raised from individual, corporate, foundation, and institutional investors. Lastly, we recognize the need for increased community engagement and awareness around the need for affordable housing on the Eastside. We have identified additional opportunities to increase our visibility as an organization so we are able to serve as an advocate for the importance of affordable housing throughout our Eastside communities.

The Imagine Housing Leadership Team has a combined tenure of over 30 years of experience and consists of: President & CEO, Villette Nolon; Chief Operating Officer, Rick Toney; Director of Finance, Sue Bliven; Director of Redevelopment, Troy Drawz; Director of Housing Development, Megan Adams and Director of Supportive Services, Ruben Rivera-Jackman. Additional key roles include HR Manager, Eunice Springs, Senior Asset Manager, Marcus Binion, Compliance and Office Manager, Hester Winn and Supportive Services Manager, Eunice Gonzaga. Our Board of Directors is comprised of 17 industry professionals and experts, who are active in supporting every facet of our organization including finance, housing development, investment, cultural competency, and strategic leadership. As we continue to work toward our Imagine 1,000 initiative, we recognize that as an agency we must work hard to maximize our efficiency in order to enhance our current capacity as a 26 person staff, while considering areas for future growth. With a renewed focus on workforce development and staff retention, we continue to prioritize the individual and collective strengths and skillsets within each department. Recently, we hired a new Director of Supportive Services, completed a team restructure and have been engaged in intentional recruitment and hiring in a way that reflects the strengths of team members and departments, while supporting a healthy work load capacity. This renewed focus on accountability and presence throughout our departments has increased efficiency, built momentum, and resulted in commitment from staff of reaching our Imagine 1,000 goal.

Imagine Housing’s ultimate impact is to provide homes, stability, support, and opportunity for low-income households. We track our success in number of homes built, people served, affordability created, and metrics around services provided to residents. Last year we implemented a dashboard for tracking key metrics, updated monthly by each department. This tool allows us to capture monthly snapshots of department goals, while allowing for us to set goals, analyze trends, and track our progress. It paints an accessible view of each department and has proven immensely effective in facilitating communication between departments and between the staff and Board, as well as serving as a measure of accountability to stakeholders. Supportive services and resident data are tracked at properties in their own database, implemented in 2018. This tool has streamlined the data, subsequently improving efficiency and accuracy to our outcomes monitoring and supplementing resident feedback survey data in tracking unduplicated residents served, resource referrals, number of community events, household stability, increased sense of community, follow through on case plans and case management hours provided at each of our communities.

Imagine Housing’s impact is to provide housing stability and economic mobility for low-income households. We track our success in number of homes built, people served, affordability created, and metrics around services provided to residents. Here is a sample of our 2018 outcomes: - Household stability: 99% - Occupancy rate: 98% - # of units in feasibility: 171 - # of new units funded: 284 Last year we implemented a dashboard for tracking key metrics, updated monthly by each department. This tool captures monthly snapshots of department goals, allows us to set goals, analyze trends, and track our progress. This tool has proven immensely effective in facilitating communication between the staff and Board of Directors, as well as serving as a measure of accountability to stakeholders. Supportive services and resident data are tracked at properties in their own database, implemented in 2018. This tool has streamlined the data, subsequently improving efficiency and accuracy to our outcomes monitoring. We measure household stability among formerly homeless households, defined as remaining in their home for at least 12 months. We also track the number who move from transitional to permanent housing (92%). Our Supportive Services team works one on one with residents exiting homelessness to develop personal goal plans, with success defined by the residents. 90% of formerly homeless residents created a personal goal plan within three months of program entry, and 80% of those actively worked on their personal goal plan. Lastly, we track sense of community for our residents as a result of our supportive services team (95%).

External Reviews

Financials

Imagine Housing

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/06/2020

Leadership

No data

Race & Ethnicity

No data

Gender Identity

No data

Sexual Orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity Strategies

Last updated: 02/06/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data

done
We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
done
We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
done
We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
done
We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.

Policies and processes

done
We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
done
We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
done
We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
done
We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.