HomeRise

Breaking the cycle of homelessness

aka HomeRise   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.chp-sf.org

Mission

HomeRise’s mission is to help people experiencing homelessness secure housing and become self-sufficient.

Ruling year info

1994

CEO

Mr. Rick Aubry

Main address

20 Jones Street Suite 200

San Francisco, CA 94102 USA

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Formerly known as

Community Housing Partnership

EIN

94-3112338

NTEE code info

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In San Francisco, homelessness is a problem that is getting worse every day, not better. In the last 2 years, homeless in our city has increased by 30% and approximately 10,000 people now sleep on the streets or in vehicles every night. Business as usual has not reduced homelessness. Rents continue to rise, gentrification of previously affordable neighborhoods occurs, and new individuals are pushed into homelessness every day. Major, systemic change is needed and it will take a collective effort by our entire city from local government to corporations, mental and behavioral health providers, the philanthropic community, individuals and neighborhoods. That is why, in addition to developing and managing supportive housing for formerly homeless individuals, Community Housing Partnership is also a thought leader and major advocate for new political policies that will eliminate the existing barriers which are currently preventing widespread development of housing and services for homeless

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing

We currently own, manage and/or provide support services in 17 buildings in San Francisco – a total of over 1,300 units, with 240 more in development. Together they house more than 1,700 formerly homeless individuals. All of our buildings have integrated onsite property management and support services to help residents transition out of homelessness and lead healthy and productive lives. HomeRise’s programs focus on providing valuable support services and training to a traditionally underserved population. HomeRise (formerly Community Housing Partnership) provides pathways to success for those who have experienced homelessness.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

In addition to housing, HomeRise (formerly Community Housing Partnership) offers a diverse selection of voluntary, support services for our tenants. These services assist our tenants maintain their housing and reconnect with their life goals such as education, employment, and civic engagement. While the process of obtaining stable housing is a long journey for tenants, the transition is often more overwhelming than they expect. It is common tenants experience an increase in mental health/trauma related symptoms during the first six-to-twelve month in housing. Without appropriate intervention, tenants are at risk of increased self-medication through alcohol or drugs. HomeRise provides onsite tenant services, intensive case management, and youth and family services.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

HomeRise's Employment & Training Services offer residents of supportive housing a wide scope of services, including: pre-employment counseling, classroom-based instruction, on-the-job training, job search assistance, and post-placement retention support. HomeRise (formerly Community Housing Partnership) also has an integrated employment and training services which has a 75% job placement rate upon graduation from the training program. HomeRise also offers short-term job opportunities to graduates. HomeRise’s services create realistic and attainable pathways for formerly homeless adults to enter the workforce and succeed in employment.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Homeless people

Solutions SF is HomeRise’s social enterprise providing front desk services to supportive and affordable housing sites throughout San Francisco. Solutions SF combines outstanding Lobby Services with ongoing support and training as employees transition back into the workplace and continue their success. Solutions SF works to meet both of its bottom lines: its social impact and its enterprise/business success. With thousands of buildings in San Francisco experiencing a need for property management staffing and services, Solutions SF offers customers a valuable social benefit in a high-demand sector. Nearly 100% of Solutions SF employees have previously experienced homelessness and are returning to the workforce upon obtaining housing. These individuals have been thoroughly trained and evaluated as being ready to excel at their work responsibilities.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Public Policy and Community Organizing (PPCO) is a program of HomeRise (formerly Community Housing Partnership) that launched in 2007. PPCO aims to create community organizing leaders who catalyze social change in San Francisco, promote social justice, and advocate for issues critical to poverty and homelessness. PPCO provides the opportunities and structure for this work and is integral to CHP’s mission. PPCO’s model of community organizing combines political advocacy with resiliency based community building. This approach addresses the need for formerly homeless individuals to challenge the systemic root causes of poverty and inequality.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults

Where we work

Awards

The American Institute of Architects, San Francisco Chapter 2013

Special Achievement Award

American Institute of Architecture/ Housing and Urban Development 2012

Excellence in Affordable Housing Design Award to the Drs. Julian and Ray Richardson Apartments

Pacific Coast Builders’ Conference 2012

Gold Nugget Award for the Drs. Julian and Ray Richardson Apartments

San Francisco Business Times 2012

Real Estate Deal of the Year Award – Best Residential, Affordable for the Drs. Julian and Raye Richardson Apartments

Philanthropedia 2012

Top Nonprofit

California Supportive Housing 2011

Quality Award for Achieving Excellence in Operations & Management and Service Delivery

San Francisco Business Times 2009

Real Estate Deal of the Year, Finalist for the Arnett Watson Apartments

MetLife Foundation 2007

Excellence in Affordable Housing for the Senator Residence

Union Bank of California 2006

Cornerstone Award

MetLife Foundation 2003

Excellence in Affordable Housing for the IroquoisResidence

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Community Housing Partnership was formed in 1989, in the wake of the Loma Prieta earthquake, which damaged many of San Francisco’s SRO hotels that had previously been used by the SF Department of Human Services as emergency housing for the homeless. The widespread destruction triggered the release of federal, state and local emergency housing funds, as well as funding from FEMA and charitable organizations to repair or replace damaged structures. Prior to the earthquake (in 1988), the SF Coalition on Homelessness, an advocacy group, had developed a policy document called "Transitional Housing - the Next Step" which laid out a strategic plan for improved housing and services for homeless individuals, beyond just putting them up in SROs and hoping for the best. In the wake of the earthquake and subsequent reconstruction, this plan was adopted by the Mayor and City of SF. In order to become more effective at implementing its own recommendations, the Coalition on Homelessness advocacy group, merged with the Council of Community Housing Organizations, a local coalition of non-profit housing developers, and became the Community Housing Partnership. Because of this start, Community Housing Partnership takes a holistic approach to reducing homelessness in San Francisco, and our work addresses both the immediate need of providing housing and services for individuals who are recovering from homelessness, as well as advocating for changes to laws and public policies in order to address the larger societal and economic root causes of homelessness.

Three of our main areas of focus are: 1) Providing supportive housing to formerly homeless individuals (housing along with case management and services) that helps them to become self-sufficient and eventually graduate to independent or less service-enriched housing. 2) Providing a job training and job placement program to help formerly homeless individuals become self-supporting. 3) Utilizing our Community Organizing & Resident Engagement (CORE) program to advocate for public and governmental support for policies that address the root causes of homelessness and expand housing opportunities for low-income individuals.
Supportive Housing: Community Housing Partnership currently owns, manages, and/or provides services in 17 buildings in San Francisco which serve over 1,700 individuals and families annually. All of CHP's housing properties are service enriched: they either have programs and services onsite or collocated with another one of or properties nearby. Depending on a client’s needs, these services can include everything from basic case management with regular check-ins, to behavioral health and substance abuse counseling, life skills & coping skills training, programs targeted to parents and seniors, help applying for and navigating the public benefits system, resident engagement activities including opportunities to volunteer in the community, referrals to our in-housing job training program, or referrals to other programs if we can’t serve a particular need in-house.
Employment Opportunities: It is generally acknowledged that the best way to help formerly homeless individuals achieve permanent, economic stability is to help them rejoin the workforce. CHP’s employment services is a workforce development program which provides a way to mitigate some of the barriers which traditionally prevent individuals from obtaining jobs. These can include prior criminal charges, physical and/or mental health issues, a lack of work experience or steady work history –or a combination of any/all of those. Our 15-month program addresses this problem by providing job skills training, paid on-the-job training and work experience with CHP’s social enterprise, help to apply for and secure permanent positions, as well as one year of continued support and mentorship to ensure the program graduate’s continuing success and job retention.
Community Organizing & Resident Engagement (CORE): CHP believes in giving our residents a voice to address social and economic justice issues that directly affect their lives. We offer a “We Are All Organizers” training program and associated field training for residents who are interested in participating in community organizing. Our advocacy efforts use proven, evidence based messaging to show that all SF residents have a connection to, and stake in, the homelessness crisis; how public policies impact homelessness and poverty; and also to explain the collective economic & social benefits of addressing this problem. Staff work

Supportive Housing: CHP was founded in 1990 and in the 30 years since, we have grown to be the largest 100% supportive housing provider in San Francisco. We currently own, manage, and/or provide services in 17 buildings in San Francisco that house over 1,700 formerly homeless individuals and families annually. Although most of CHP’s residents are considered “chronically homeless” (per HUD’s definition) at the time that they arrive at our door –meaning they have been consistently homeless for at least a year, or have been homeless off and on for the majority of the past three years- an amazing 98% of our residents are remaining stably housed, thus permanently breaking the cycle of homelessness.

Employment Opportunities: Since 2012, CHP’s employment program has been training formerly homeless individuals to perform front desk and custodial jobs for multi-family residential properties –many of which serve low-income individuals and families. The in-house social enterprise portion of the program functions as a temporary and short-term staffing service that can quickly deploy skilled labor. This business generates a double bottom line by bringing in more than $3 million in annual revenue from its customers while also providing on-the-job training and work experience to its formerly homeless trainees who earn wages of $16-$18/hr while preparing to re-enter the workforce. Approximately 53% of participants are ex-offenders, 52% have been long-term unemployed, 42% are individuals with mental and/or physical disabilities, 12% are disconnected youth under the age of 24, and 4% are part of the CalWORKS program that provides public assistance to eligible families where the principal earner has been unemployed. Of the 115 individuals who participated in the program in 2018, 88% were still employed 6 months after moving on to permanent employment and we continue to track graduates success and provide mentorship and support up until the 12-month mark.

Advocacy: Community Housing Partnership was founded in 1989 with the dual missions of addressing both the immediate need to provide housing and services for homeless individuals, as well as advocating for changes to laws and public policies in order to address the larger societal and economic root causes of homelessness. Some of our past successful advocacy efforts have been: as a member of the coalition which pushed for the landmark passage of the Fair Chance Ordinance that stopped employers from discriminating against applicants with criminal records; the passage of Proposition W on the November 2016 ballot, which ultimately made City College free for all SF residents; the successful 2018 joint effort with the SF Public Defender's office and other community organizations to abolish county criminal court fees, as well as many other grassroots community organizing efforts that resulted in support by voters and politicians and major changes to public policies and laws.

Supportive Housing: Most of CHP’s residents are considered “chronically homeless” per HUD’s definition and have been consistently homeless for at least a year, or have been homeless off and on for the majority of the past three years before coming to us. Despite this, an amazing 98% of our residents are remaining stably housed, thus permanently breaking the cycle of homelessness. Our 2020 Strategic Plan lists 3 overarching goals which the organization will focus on in order to better serve this mission. The goals are then supported by specific and measurable tasks which will accomplish these goals. The goals are: 1) Deepen Tenant Impact, 2) Lead systems change, and 3) Strengthen Organizational Capacity.

Employment Opportunities: Currently, 88% of our Employment Opportunities program graduates stay at their first, permanent job for at least 6 months – a figure that is actually slightly higher than comparable data for the regular SF workforce. Additionally, our in-house social enterprise business which functions as a temporary staffing service for building & property managers is generating more than $3 million in annual revenue from its customers, while enabling us to pay our trainees starting wages of approximately $18/hour. We also operate a Community Volunteer Team for residents who aren’t prepared to move immediately from long term homelessness and unemployment, to meeting the requirements of job training programs or employment, and need an interim step. Based on a commitment of 40 flexibly scheduled hours for participants, and using a group-based, staff-supervised model, individuals have the opportunity to earn a stipend while volunteering with partner nonprofit organizations. Although we have a great group of partner nonprofits (Oakland A’s, Presidio Gardens, Hunters Point Food Pantry, and others), there is great demand for this type of program and we’d like to increase our capacity to handle additional participants and volunteer opportunities.

Advocacy: For 30 years, CHP has provided a voice to homeless and low-income residents of San Francisco. Although we have both led and participated in many major political wins, our work is not done. Current efforts focus on achieving widely available mental health and substance abuse treatment for homeless & low-income individuals. (“Treatment on Demand”, “Mental Health SF”, etc.) We also continue to work to gain public and political support at state and local levels for a major increase in development of affordable and subsidized housing for low-income Bay Area residents. (Proposition A, Proposition E, etc.)

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HomeRise

Board of directors
as of 8/31/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Greg Miller

Coblentz Patch Duffy & Bass LLP

Term: 2018 - 2021

Jonathan Wyler

Independent Consultant

John Fisher

SKS Partners

Sheila Aharoni

Cloudshare

Steve Bowdry

Bowdry Properties

Devra Edelman

Independent Consultant

Mark Eshman

Clear Rock Capital

David Elliott Lewis

Writer/Activist

Patrick Valentino

Rodriguez Wright LLP

Malea Chavez

Homeless Prenatal Program

Samantha Lew

Coalition on Homelessness

Juthaporn Chaliocheep

Tenant Representative

Neil Sims

Retired

Julia Reed

Schwab Charitable

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/31/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/31/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.