Latino Commision on Alcohol & Drug Abuse Services of San Mateo County

TRANSFORMING COMMUNITIES one family at a time

aka The Latino Commission   |   San Bruno, CA   |  https://www.thelatinocommission.org

Mission

Restoring people holistically, in an environment of love and understanding that represents our culture, improving quality of life.

Ruling year info

1997

Executive Director

Debra Camarillo

Main address

1001 Sneath Lane Suite 307

San Bruno, CA 94066 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-3149136

NTEE code info

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

Health Treatment Facilities (Primarily Outpatient) (E30)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our programs contains our 30-year history of knowledge and wisdom learned from Latino culturally-specific models we developed, with activities proven to address avoidable social inequities The model acknowledges and targets historical racial prejudices, contemporary injustices, economic disparities, and the health disparities of Latinos. We were founded when there was no organization providing substance abuse services for the Spanish-speaking population in San Mateo County, especially for people involved in the court or criminal justice system. If you were on trial or perhaps already incarcerated, you only spoke Spanish and had an alcohol or drug problem, there was no Spanish alternative treatment opportunity for you, if you were in jail, you stayed in jail. Now we operate state-licensed adult substance abuse recovery facilities, behavioral and mental health treatment, outpatient services with life-skills training, health education and prevention.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Residential Substance Abuse Recovery

We operate State Licensed and Drug Medi-Cal Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Residential Recovery at 5 locations in San Francisco and San Mateo Counties. We combine a Cultural Model with Evidence Base Practices in Substance Use Disorder (SUD) treatment. Our certified SUD Counselors work in coordination with Mental Health Counselors, a Registered Nurse and Medical Doctor to provide comprehensive services to enable people with addiction to live a new life in recovery.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
People of Latin American descent

Substance abuse behavioral health services to the community such as: intake, assessment, screening, individual counseling, group counseling, relapse prevention, anger management, HIV education, domestic violence prevention, family reunification, parenting classes, and resource/referral.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
People of Latin American descent

Educating young Latinas and Latinos at an early age as well as teaching them about the various options they have regarding teen pregnancy. Help teen mothers to raise their newborns healthy and to not become pregnant again in the near future.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
People of Latin American descent

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants reporting risky sexual behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Adolescents, Migrant workers

Related Program

Youth Development and Teen Pregnancy Prevention - Central Valley

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Five Youth Programs in Cutler-Orosi and Dinuba, Tulare County. Teen Pregnancy Prevention for girls- Adelante Latina, Prevention for boys - Los Guerreros. Youth Development for girls - Xinachtli.

Number of students receiving information on HIV/AIDS and STDs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, People of Latin American descent, Migrant workers

Related Program

Youth Development and Teen Pregnancy Prevention - Central Valley

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs, and Youth Development College Prep.

Number of students receiving information on tobacco use and addiction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, People of Latin American descent, Migrant workers

Related Program

Youth Development and Teen Pregnancy Prevention - Central Valley

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs, and Youth Development College Prep.

Number of students receiving information on alcohol and other drug use

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, People of Latin American descent, Migrant workers

Related Program

Youth Development and Teen Pregnancy Prevention - Central Valley

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs, and Youth Development College Prep.

Number of people reporting that their health provider always listened carefully to them

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Substance abusers

Related Program

Residential Substance Abuse Recovery

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Survey results from: 110 adult respondents in 2020 120 adult respondents in 2019 110 adult respondents in 2018.

Number of clients who report general satisfaction with their services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Substance abusers

Related Program

Entre Familia Outpatient Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

From 130 respondents to satisfaction survey

Number of clients who report adequate culturally appropriate services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Residential Substance Abuse Recovery

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Clients from All Programs, All Cities 260 responses

Number of clients who report adequate access to services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Substance abusers

Related Program

Residential Substance Abuse Recovery

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All Programs, 200 responses

Number of clients who report adequate participation in their own treatment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Substance abusers

Related Program

Residential Substance Abuse Recovery

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average youth self-rating of functioning and coping skills

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people, Migrant workers

Related Program

Youth Development and Teen Pregnancy Prevention - Central Valley

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

160 self report increased functioning.

Number of participants who would recommend program to others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Residential Substance Abuse Recovery

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

ALL Programs, All Cities, 260 responses

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All Programs, All Cities, 260 responses

Number of youth and families for whom a cultural inventory (e.g., cultural/ethnic identity, language, values, spiritual life, family traditions, gender and sexual identity issues, other relevant preferences, etc.) is completed and used to develop the treatment and support plan

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, People of Latin American descent, Migrant workers

Related Program

Youth Development and Teen Pregnancy Prevention - Central Valley

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Mexican American Cultural Values Scale

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed coping skills

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people, Migrant workers

Related Program

Youth Development and Teen Pregnancy Prevention - Central Valley

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Self-Concept Survey

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Be a driving force for increasing access to healthcare especially behavioral health substance abuse services to Latinos in San Francisco and San Mateo counties.

Enhance and expand our culturally-centered service model combining evidence base practices with a process for recovery rooted in Latino cultural traditions and family values.

Be a leader providing substance abuse recovery services for incarcerated adults (primarily Spanish-speaking) who are re-entering society.

Strengthen our presence and impact providing teen pregnancy prevention services and youth development in the rural farming communities of Cutler-Orosi.

Be a guide and advocate for teen mothers getting them on a path to success.

Operate a minimum 5 state-licensed recovery facilities with additional MD, LMFT, group trainings, and transportation services to address co-occurring disorders.

Ensure effective and efficient business operations, improve program alignment for drug medi-Cal certification, and increase capacity to `utilize available funding,

Increase the knowledge and involvement of parents as advocates for adding behavioral and mental health services supporting the youth in their communities.

Support and encourage staff to maintain and enhance substance abuse trainings for license/certification including El Joven Nobles and Xinatchli curriculum trainers.

Implement a Latino Conference to create connections, deepen engagement, and increase impact by embracing our culture and celebrating diversity and inclusion.

We recruit, train and maintain high quality, mission-driven staff, volunteers, and collaboration partners to develop resources, deepen connections and produce action.

We organize a training conference with 20 'experts in their field' regarding health and human services, behavioral and mental health for 200 counselors serving Latinos.

We engage people in local advocacy to ensure decision-makers are fully informed.

We ensure an inclusive and powerful experience respecting all cultures and people.

We involve clients in the design and preparation of their individual treatment plan.

For 30 years offering the only Spanish-speaking, culturally-based, residential, substance abuse programs for men, women and mothers with child in Bay Area.

We are recognized as a catalyst for advancement in health and human services for Latinos, emphasizing the indigenous teachings of our ancestors.

We help reduce teen pregnancy rates in Cutler-Orosi (down 50% in 3 years). We still need reductions as the teen pregnancy rate is still much higher than the state average.

Our substance abuse clients have a 65% success rate for recovery which far exceeds the county and state averages.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Using El Joven Noble an element learned from the National Compadres Network (TLC Counselors are certified instructor/trainers and participate in ongoing training updates), we delve further into the roles of men and women, where machismo has a detrimental effect and can even contribute to teen pregnancy in Latino communities. However, we show there are characteristics within these roles that support a positive shift in behavior and attitudes. For example, for Latino men, the attributes of being “a man of our word” and being protective of your family (especially mother and sisters) can be translated into extending this care, responsibility, and protectiveness to their partner or girlfriend.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Latino Commision on Alcohol & Drug Abuse Services of San Mateo County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Latino Commision on Alcohol & Drug Abuse Services of San Mateo County

Board of directors
as of 1/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Olga Aldana

Wells Fargo Bank

Term: 2016 - 2019


Board co-chair

Dee Dee Rodriguez

San Francisco PreTrial

Term: 2016 - 2019

Dee Dee Rodriguez

San Francisco PreTrial

Suzie Sandoval

City of Milbrae

Doren Martin

Fund Development

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/20/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/04/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.