California School-Based Health Alliance

Oakland, CA   |  http://www.schoolhealthcenters.org

Mission

The California School-Based Health Alliance (CSHA) improves the health and academic success of children and youth by advancing health services in schools.  We envision a day when all of California's children and youth are healthy and achieving at their full potential.   We conduct policy work, promote the school-based health center (SBHC) model, and assist SBHCs with program development to expand and strengthen school health services.  Our large network of collaborating partners includes 258 SBHCs, numerous school districts, federally qualified health centers and other providers, dozens of state and local policy organizations, and an e-communications network of more than 5,000 individuals.

Ruling year info

2007

Acting Executive Director

Ms. Amy Manta-Ranger MPH

Main address

1203 Preservation Park Way Suite 302

Oakland, CA 94612 USA

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Formerly known as

California School Health Centers Association

EIN

94-3201896

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (E01)

Community Health Systems (E21)

Management & Technical Assistance (O02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Policy

CSHA is the lead organization in California advocating for policies that support the expansion and sustainability of school health centers, as well as a key player on a broader array of school health and mental health issues and children's access to health coverage and care.

Some of our activities include: legislative advocacy; coordination with state agencies; partnerships with other children's and health care advocates; and work with managed-care organizations. We helped pass legislation in California to create a statewide program for school-based health centers. While this bill has not been funded due to the budget crisis, its passage has raised the visibility of school-based health centers as an important part of the health care safety net.

Population(s) Served

We develop tools and resources for starting and running school-based health centers. In addition, we provide individualized technical assistance and conduct training to help communities and schools start and run school-based health centers.

Population(s) Served

We promote the school-based health center model to school districts, community leaders, parents and students, and potential community partners in order to create awareness of how school-based health centers can improve student access to health care and increase educational outcomes.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CSHA's goal is increased access to effective school-based health services that contributes to all children and youth in California being healthy and achieving at their full potential in school and beyond.

The strategies CSHA uses to help increase kids' access to effective school health services are:

1. Legislative and administrative public policy and advocacy
2. Training and technical assistance to support the start-up and implementation of school-based health services (e.g., toolkits, webinars)
3. Resource cultivation for school-based health services among private funders and industry partners
4. Outreach and communications to generate awareness, interest, and support for school-based health services
5. Annual conference and other initiatives to connect school-based health stakeholders and generate engagement and leadership for the statewide movement to bring health care to schools
6. Shaping the conversation about school-based health care within the context of health and education reform
7. Generating evidence to promote successful care delivery models in schools

CSHA is the organization leading California's school-based health care movement. Our work falls in to three key areas.

We provide technical assistance to help schools and communities put health care where kids are -- at school. We develop tools and resources to help schools, clinics, and school-based health centers develop and strengthen school health programs. We also manage a number of special projects and learning collaboratives focusing on areas such as nutrition and fitness, youth leadership development, and outreach and enrollment. Our conference, webinars, tool kits, and technical assistance help school-based health centers offer high quality, age-appropriate care to kids. Our experts analyze the scope and impact of school-based health centers. We freely share best practices so kids can get the best care.

We advocate for policies that improve access to high quality care for kids by making school-based health centers an integral part of the health care and education systems. Current policy initiatives include seeking re-authorization of the federal School Health Centers Act, shaping the role school-based health centers play in health care reform, and identifying ways to strengthen the role of school-based health centers in the education system.

We conduct outreach to help expand awareness of the school-based health center model, generate school district interest in school-based health care, and build support for the school health movement.

The number of school health centers in California has doubled in the past 10 years since we hired our first paid staff, and recognition of this unique strategy for providing health care to youth has increased dramatically. There are now 231 school-based health centers in California - more than double the number that existed a decade ago. Another 34 schools are in the process of opening new health centers.

Our other accomplishments include:

• Helping secure $200 million for school health center capital grants and an authorization for a program to fund school health center operations in the Affordable Care Act.
• Assisting 70 California sites in securing $30 million in federal grants which will result in 48 new school health centers.
• Hosting a statewide conference for 500 school health stakeholders to learn about issues and challenges facing school health centers, network, and develop new expertise.
• Sponsoring AB 174 to expand trauma-informed mental health services at schools. The bill was vetoed by the Governor who supported the program but felt that legislation was not required to establish it.
• Launching a new program training youth to educate their peers and communities about the Health Exchange. During its first year, our Peer Health Insurance Rights and Education program (PHIRE) trained 31 youth who in turn educated more than 2,500 of their peers.
• Receiving a grant from Covered California to engage a network of 12 school health centers and community health providers to educate young people about the Health Exchange.
• Serving as a lead partner in the launch of All-In, a statewide campaign to encourage school districts to provide families with information about new health coverage options through the Affordable Care Act.
• Developing resource materials on patient-centered medical home, adolescent patient experience, performance measures, electronic heath records, adolescent-friendly services, and trauma-informed practices to improve the quality and sustainability of services in school health centers.
• Hosting two conferences of 100 youth each for our Youth-2-Youth network that engages our youth board of high school graduates to mentor high school youth to be health advocates.
• Engaging a growing list of school-health stakeholders in the movement to bring healthcare to kids at school. Our large network includes 231 SBHCs, numerous school districts, federally qualified health centers and other providers, dozens of state and local policy organizations, and an e-communications network of more than 3,500 contacts.
• Providing technical guidance to the six West Contra Costa Unified School District high school health centers to improve their sustainability, impact and integration into the schools.

One of our major goals that we have not yet accomplished is securing a state funding source for school-based health centers.

Financials

California School-Based Health Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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California School-Based Health Alliance

Board of directors
as of 6/18/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kimberly Uyeda

Student Medical Services and Community Partnerships, LAUSD

Term: 2018 - 2020

Kimberly Uyeda

Los Angeles Unified School District

Jan Marquard

Northeast Valley Health Corporation

Dexter Webster

dTc Advisory Services

Bertrand Perdomo-Ucles

Teach for America (Formerly)

Cecilia Echeverria

Kaiser Permanente

Michael Lujan

Limelight Health

Kimball Wilkins

Blue Shield of California

Barbara Kronick

Sacramento City Unified School District (retired)

Sergio Morales

Essential Access Health

Tahira Cunningham

Social Interest Solutions

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No