Environmental Quality Protection, Beautification

WESTERN WATERSHEDS PROJECT INC

aka WWP   |   Hailey, ID   |  http://www.westernwatersheds.org

Mission

The mission of Western Watersheds Project is protecting and restoring western public lands, watersheds and wildlife through education, public policy initiatives and legal advocacy.

Notes from the nonprofit

All of WWP's efforts to influence the restoration of western public lands are based on a vision that western North America may be one of the few places on earth where enough of the native landscape and wildlife still exists as public land to make possible the restoration of a wild natural world.

Ruling year info

1994

Executive Director

Erik Molvar

Main address

PO Box 1770 126 S Main St Ste B-3

Hailey, ID 83333 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

94-3202140

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Public Lands Protection and Restoration

WWP staff members – along with volunteer and contract field monitors – work proactively to identify damaged streams and watersheds and document abusive land management practices. When staff or volunteers document excessive numbers of livestock on grazing allotments, violations of turnout times, ongoing trespass, overgrazing, degradation of streams and stream banks, destruction of riparian and upland habitat, and illegal diversions of water, this information is submitted to the agency that manages the allotment.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add geographic service areas to create a map on your profile.

Login and update

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Western Watershed Project’s work to limit damage to our public lands by livestock grazing is varied and highly complex. On a daily basis, WWP staff and volunteers engage in efforts to identify and evaluate specific grazing allotments, monitor grazing activities and report abusive land management practices, provide education about the impacts of grazing, promote the voluntary retirement of grazing permits, and transform public lands management by advocating for and pursuing legislative and legal solutions. In an ever-changing regulatory environment where the BLM and USFS often resist efforts to change land management practices, and make it difficult to meet the growing demand for voluntary retirement of grazing permits, WWP nimbly and effectively protects and restores our public lands.

When and where possible and as resources allow, staff and volunteers systematically monitor water quality and fish and wildlife habitat on grazing allotments. Data obtained from this monitoring is used to help educate community members, ranchers, governmental agencies and policy makers on the environmental impacts of livestock grazing on water, fish and wildlife. Additionally, when necessary, WWP brings legal discipline when public land management is lax or political forces have intervened in the land management process. Although legal advocacy may be seen by some as a ‘hard line’ tactic, it is based simply on the goal of getting the government agencies to properly enforce existing laws and standards. Finally, WWP advocates for legislation that will simplify the grazing permit retirement. Voluntary permit retirement represents a fair and effective way to resolve seemingly intractable conflicts over the damaging use of public lands for livestock production.

Western Watersheds Project has already achieved many successes since 1993, despite our limited budget and staff. WWP is comprised of a talented group of biologists, directors and advocates who stay laser focused on our mission

Everyday, WWP’s achievements in revising public land management plans, contributes to a restoration of habitat and species throughout the west. By overseeing and monitoring federal and state management of these lands, by taking action to prevent mismanagement when evident, and by advocating for and purchasing voluntarily retired grazing permits. Western Watersheds Project works on behalf of all of us who believe that our own health and well-being is dependent upon the health of the streams, rivers, plant species and wildlife that surround us. <br/><br/>WWP’s headquarters are located in Sun Valley, Idaho, with field offices in Boise, Pinedale (Wyoming), Reseda (California), Missoula (Montana), Bend (Oregon), Kanab (Utah), and Tucson (Arizona).

• In 2006, WWP challenged in court Bureau of Land Management rule revisions which would have drastically diminished restrictions on grazing on over 150 million acres of public land nationwide, limited the amount of public comment the BLM had to consider, and diluted the BLM's authority to sanction ranchers for grazing violations. In a comprehensive court victory for WWP, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the Bureau of Land Management had violated the Endangered Species Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, and the Federal Land Policy and Management Act in creating its new grazing rules. Had the new rule revisions gone into effect, oversight of federal public lands would have been severely weakened.<br/><br/>• In 2010, WWP signed a precedent-setting agreement with El Paso Corporation, a Houston-based natural gas transmission company. In return for WWP’s agreement to refrain from opposing El Paso’s proposed 650-mile Ruby Pipeline from Opal, Wyoming to Malin, Oregon, El Paso agreed to contribute $15 million over ten years to create the Sagebrush Habitat Conservation Fund. The Fund is dedicated to buying voluntarily offered federal grazing permits wherever they can be permanently retired. Since the inception of the Fund, grazing permits on over 400,000 acres of public land have been retired.<br/><br/>• In 2011, WWP won a Federal District Court ruling overturning two BLM Resource Management Plans in Idaho and Wyoming which resulted in protecting sage-grouse on three million acres of public land.<br/><br/><br/>• The fall of 2012 brought a confirmed sighting of a Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep ewe on a part of the Payette National Forest northwest of McCall, Idaho. This was the first wild bighorn sighting on this portion of the forest in many decades, and 2012 was the first year in over 100 years that these public lands were closed to private domestic sheep grazing. This change was due to a successful WWP lawsuit over the risk of disease transmission between livestock and wild sheep. Additionally, the Forest Service is now required to review all active domestic sheep grazing allotments located within 10 kilometers of the allotment where the confirmed bighorn sighting occurs to determine if those should be closed as well. As a consequence, 2012 also saw successful federal legislation that mandates the retirement of relinquished domestic sheep grazing permits, where conflict with bighorn occurs. This has west-wide results as grazing permits are being voluntarily retired in areas of conflict between wild sheep and domestic sheep. <br/><br/>• 2013 WWP partnered with The Sagebrush Habitat Fund and two ranchers to voluntarily and permanently retire 130,000 acres of BLM managed grazing allotments in Idaho’s Owyhee River Wilderness, protecting and restoring habitat for bighorn sheep, sage-grouse and other native species.<br/><br/>• WWP continues to exercise the ‘muscle’ of the Endangered Species Act to continue advocating for the protection of threatened animals and plants.

Financials

WESTERN WATERSHEDS PROJECT INC
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WESTERN WATERSHEDS PROJECT INC

Board of directors
as of 10/2/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kelley Weston

No Affiliation

Bruce Hayse

No Affiliation

Kelley Weston

No Affiliation

Erin Anchustegui

Boise State University

Ralph Maughan

No Affiliation

George Wuerthner

No Affiliation

Karen Klitz

UC Berkley

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Keywords

Watershed Restoration, Public Lands Monitoring and Legal Advocacy