PLATINUM2024

National Harm Reduction Coalition

New York, NY   |  www.harmreduction.org

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Mission

Harm Reduction Coalition is a national advocacy and capacity-building organization that promotes the health and dignity of individuals and communities impacted by drug use. Our efforts advance harm reduction policies, practices and programs that address the adverse effects of drug use including overdose, HIV, hepatitis C, addiction, and incarceration. Recognizing that social inequality and injustice magnify drug-related harm and limit the voice of our most vulnerable communities, we work to uphold every individual’s right to health and well-being and their competence to participate in the public policy dialogue.

Ruling year info

1994

Executive Director

Laura Guzman

Main address

22 W 27TH St Fl 5

New York, NY 10001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-3204958

NTEE code info

er Public Safety, Disaster Preparedness, and Relief N.E.C.) (POt)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The politics, finances, and cultural values of the modern world have contributed to severe limitations in the social safety net for individuals who use drugs. Punitive drug policies, influenced by political agendas and cultural biases, often prioritize criminalization over public health and harm reduction efforts. Limited financial resources allocated towards comprehensive healthcare and social support exacerbate the situation, leaving individuals who use drugs marginalized and underserved. This systemic marginalization perpetuates stigma and discrimination, hindering access to education, healthcare, and community support. Consequently, this population faces increased risks of infectious diseases, economic disempowerment, and diminished quality of life. Addressing these systemic barriers is crucial for promoting health equity and societal well-being.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Training and Capacity Building

Building capacity with other organizations fuels and scales the harm reduction movement. National Harm Reduction Coalition is committed to promoting education and engagement, and building power alongside communities affected by drug use and racialized drug policies. Each year, we facilitate thousands of hours of training and workshops across the country to bring evidence-based harm reduction strategies to scale.

Harm reduction programs are spreading across the country, but there are still many areas where people who use drugs do not have access to tools and programs that support their health and dignity. From remote rural areas to densely-populated urban settings, we have coached communities across the country to launch and scale harm reduction programs that meet the needs of the people they love who use drugs.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Caregivers
LGBTQ people
People with diseases and illnesses

The biennial event is the only conference of its kind in the United States. For four days, some of the most creative minds from the U.S. and abroad come together to address a myriad of complex issues facing the harm reduction movement. A diverse community of people who use drugs, social justice activists, service providers, healthcare workers, researchers, policymakers, public health officials, and law enforcement all coming together to put an end to the harms and injustices caused by the War on Drugs.

Conference objectives include: Providing safe spaces for the exchange of ideas and cutting-edge practices that reduce harms associated with drug use, creating networking opportunities for people from diverse backgrounds committed to dismantling the racialized policies that underwrite and perpetuate oppression, and challenging stigmatizing narratives about people who use drugs by supporting their leadership development and exposing social inequities driven by structural violence.

Population(s) Served

National Harm Reduction Coalition supports the health and dignity of people who use drugs. By providing educational information around safer drug use, increasing access to the powerful antidote naloxone, and conducting hundreds of overdose prevention trainings each year, we help save thousands of lives.

Population(s) Served

National Harm Reduction Coalition is committed to mobilizing communities to ensure syringe access for all. Access to sterile syringes is an evidence-based public health service that reduces HIV and hepatitis C infection rates by as much as 50 percent. SSPs offer a place to connect with other resources like housing, health care, and drug treatment. And, theyre often one of the only places where people who use drugs can find respite and connection.

Population(s) Served

Our policy and advocacy efforts aim to eliminate the existing disparities that people who use drugs face when it comes to accessing healthcare or basic human services. Were building power with local leaders to address racialized drug policies that put people who use drugs in harms way.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Caregivers
Sex workers
Homeless people
LGBTQ people
Substance abusers
Caregivers
Sex workers
Homeless people
LGBTQ people
Substance abusers
Caregivers
Sex workers
Homeless people
LGBTQ people
Substance abusers
Caregivers
Sex workers
Homeless people
LGBTQ people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of organizations accessing technical assistance offerings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers

Related Program

Training and Capacity Building

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The National Harm Reduction Coalition recognizes the multifaceted challenges faced by individuals who use drugs due to systemic factors such as politics, finances, and cultural values. In response, our organization is dedicated to implementing comprehensive harm reduction strategies aimed at addressing these issues and promoting health equity.

Our primary goal is to prevent overdose deaths through a range of initiatives. We provide overdose prevention education and promote the widespread distribution of naloxone, a life-saving medication that reverses opioid overdoses, to communities nationwide. Through training and capacity building programs, we empower individuals, organizations, and healthcare providers with the knowledge and skills needed to effectively respond to overdoses and other drug-related emergencies.

Our training and capacity building efforts encompass a wide range of initiatives aimed at empowering individuals and communities to effectively address the challenges associated with drug use. These programs provide comprehensive education on harm reduction principles and practices, including safer injection techniques, overdose recognition and response, and the importance of access to healthcare and social support services.

Community mobilization is another key aspect of our work. We collaborate with local communities to develop tailored harm reduction interventions that address their specific needs and priorities. By fostering grassroots advocacy and organizing efforts, we amplify the voices of those most affected by punitive drug policies and advocate for evidence-based solutions.

Furthermore, our organization engages in policy and advocacy efforts at the national and local levels. We work to reform harmful drug policies and promote legislation that supports harm reduction approaches, including syringe services programs (SSPs) and access to clean syringes. SSPs play a crucial role in preventing the spread of infectious diseases such as HIV and hepatitis C by providing sterile injection equipment and facilitating safe disposal. By supporting SSPs and advocating for clean syringe distribution, we aim to reduce the harms associated with injection drug use and improve public health outcomes.

Education and Awareness: We conduct educational campaigns and workshops to raise awareness about harm reduction principles and practices among diverse stakeholders, including individuals who use drugs, healthcare providers, policymakers, and the general public. By increasing understanding and reducing stigma surrounding drug use, we aim to create a more supportive environment for harm reduction initiatives.

Partnership and Collaboration: We collaborate with a wide range of organizations, including community-based groups, healthcare institutions, government agencies, and advocacy organizations, to leverage collective expertise and resources. Through strategic partnerships, we work to implement evidence-based harm reduction interventions and amplify the impact of our efforts.

Supporting Organizations Providing Direct Services: We support organizations that provide direct services to individuals who use drugs. We promote the distribution of naloxone, clean syringes, and other harm reduction supplies through our advocacy efforts and partnerships with local service providers. Additionally, we have funded dozens of Syringe Service Programs (SSPs) across the country to carry out their essential work. By advocating for policies that enable and fund these organizations, we ensure that individuals who use drugs have access to life-saving resources and comprehensive support services.

Policy Advocacy: We advocate for policy changes at the local, state, and national levels to reform harmful drug policies and promote legislation that supports harm reduction approaches. This includes advocating for the expansion of syringe exchange programs, the decriminalization of drug possession, access to medication-assisted treatment, and other evidence-based interventions.

Research and Evaluation: We conduct research and evaluation to assess the impact of harm reduction interventions, identify emerging trends and best practices, and inform our advocacy efforts. By generating evidence-based knowledge, we contribute to the advancement of harm reduction principles and practices.

Capacity Building and Training: We provide training and capacity building programs to empower individuals, organizations, and communities with the knowledge and skills needed to implement effective harm reduction strategies. This includes training on overdose prevention and naloxone distribution, stigma, safer injection techniques, HIV and hepatitis C prevention, and advocacy skills.

Community Mobilization: We engage with affected communities to mobilize grassroots advocacy efforts and empower individuals to advocate for their rights and access to healthcare and social services. By amplifying the voices of those most affected by punitive drug policies, we work to create systemic change and promote social justice.

Expertise and Knowledge: NHRC has a team of experts with in-depth knowledge of harm reduction principles, evidence-based interventions, and the social determinants of health related to drug use. Our staff members have diverse backgrounds in public health, policy advocacy, community organizing, and direct service provision, allowing us to address complex issues from multiple perspectives.

National Reach and Network: NHRC has a broad national reach and an extensive network of partners, including community-based organizations, healthcare institutions, government agencies, academic institutions, and advocacy groups. This network enables us to collaborate with stakeholders across various sectors and regions to implement harm reduction initiatives and amplify our impact.

Advocacy and Policy Expertise: NHRC has a strong track record of advocating for policy changes at the local, state, and national levels to promote harm reduction approaches and reform harmful drug policies. Our advocacy efforts are informed by research, data analysis, and grassroots mobilization, allowing us to effectively influence decision-makers and shape public policy.

Strategic Communication and Messaging: NHRC employs strategic communication and messaging strategies to raise awareness about harm reduction principles and practices, reduce stigma surrounding drug use, and mobilize support for our initiatives. We leverage traditional and digital media platforms, as well as community outreach and engagement, to disseminate information and engage diverse audiences.

Resource Mobilization and Fundraising: NHRC engages in resource mobilization and fundraising efforts to secure financial support for our programs and initiatives. We collaborate with foundations, government agencies, corporate partners, and individual donors to secure grants, sponsorships, and donations that enable us to sustain and expand our work.

Evaluation and Learning: NHRC conducts evaluation and learning activities to assess the impact of our programs and initiatives, identify lessons learned, and inform continuous improvement. We use data and feedback to measure outcomes, refine our strategies, and adapt to emerging challenges and opportunities.

Strong Relationships with Healthcare Leaders and Partners: NHRC maintains strong relationships with leaders in healthcare, including key stakeholders such as the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), state and local public health departments, national healthcare foundations, and prominent advocacy organizations like the Drug Policy Alliance and the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO). By working closely with these partners, NHRC ensures that harm reduction approaches are integrated into broader public health strategies and that individuals who use drugs have access to comprehensive, evidence-based care and support services.

The National Harm Reduction Coalition (NHRC) has achieved extraordinary milestones in advancing harm reduction principles and practices across the United States. Through our relentless dedication, NHRC has empowered thousands of individuals and organizations in 44 states and Puerto Rico with extensive in-person harm reduction training and remote technical assistance, equipping them with the knowledge and skills needed to implement life-saving strategies.

NHRC's commitment to driving change is exemplified by our unprecedented investment of $5.3 million in 42 projects across Indiana, Kentucky, West Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina. This historic grant, the largest of its kind in U.S. history, signifies a monumental leap forward in funding harm reduction programs, amplifying our impact and reach.

But our achievements don't stop there. NHRC's Know Overdose campaign in San Francisco represents a beacon of hope and progress, leading the charge in citywide overdose prevention and naloxone access. Our victories in Florida, Georgia, and Idaho, where we successfully advocated for statewide syringe services programs, stand as testament to our unwavering commitment to policy reform and advocacy.

Furthermore, NHRC's influence extends beyond legislative victories. We have been pioneers in supporting groundbreaking initiatives such as DecrimNY, driving the repeal of discriminatory laws and championing the rights of marginalized communities. Our California Harm Reduction Initiative (CHRI) stands as a shining example of transformative government investment, with $15.2 million dedicated to syringe services programs, marking a historic milestone in advancing harm reduction in the state.

As we reflect on these accomplishments, we celebrate NHRC's pivotal role in promoting health equity, social justice, and the empowerment of individuals who use drugs. With each victory, NHRC reaffirms its unwavering commitment to driving positive change and transforming lives through harm reduction, inspiring hope and fostering a brighter future for all.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

National Harm Reduction Coalition
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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National Harm Reduction Coalition

Board of directors
as of 05/10/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Rajani Gudlavalleti

Masa Group

Term: 2023 - 2026


Board co-chair

Lucy Trieshmann

Eisenberg & Baum LLP

Term: 2023 - 2026

Corinne Green

Louisiana Trans Advocates

Julie Stampler

Debora Upegui-Hernandez

Observatorio de Equidad de Genero Puerto Rico

Margaret Bordeaux

Bellwether Collaborative for Health Justice

Marlene Martin

University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Latinx Center of Excellence

Shantwina Hicks

Morgan Stanley

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/9/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/09/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.