INTERNET ARCHIVE

Universal Access To All Knowledge

aka Wayback Machine   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.archive.org

Mission

The Internet Archive is a small non-profit library with a huge mission: to give everyone access to all knowledge, forever. For free. Our goal is that anyone curious enough to seek knowledge will be able to find it here. Together we are building a special place where you can read, learn and explore. Our Wayback Machine preserves 750 million pages per day! We’ve saved 70 petabytes (that’s 70,000,000,000,000,000 bytes) of data, storing information in our data centers at a fraction of the cost of Amazon Cloud. We employ less than 100 people around the world—engineers, archivists, librarians, and book scanners. Most of our staff could be making much more at a company driven by profit, but they choose to work for a nonprofit powered by a huge mission – Universal Access To All Knowledge.

Ruling year info

2017

Principal Officer

Brewster Kahle

Main address

300 Funston Ave

San Francisco, CA 94118 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-3242767

NTEE code info

Libraries, Library Science (B70)

Citizen Participation (W24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Internet Archive is a small non-profit library with a huge mission: to give everyone access to all knowledge, forever. For free. Our goal is that anyone curious enough to seek knowledge will be able to find it on our site. Together we are building a special place where you can read, learn and explore.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Archive.org

Digital library of cultural artifacts including texts, video and audio materials.

Population(s) Served
Adults

An online archive of crawled websites keeping old versions of pages available for search and reference.

Population(s) Served
Adults

One web page for every book ever published - a lofty but achievable goal.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Lifetime Achievement Award 2017

Webby

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of petabytes of data archived

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Archive.org

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

70 petabytes of data has been archived by the Internet Archive. That's 70,000,000 gigabytes!

Number of webpages archived

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Wayback Machine

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number (listed in billions) of webpages crawled by the Wayback Machine.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Open Library
Because we are a library, we pay special attention to books. Not everyone has access to a public or academic library with a good collection, so to provide universal access we need to provide digital versions of books. We began a program to digitize books in 2005 and today we scan 3K books per day in 15 locations around the world. Books published prior to 1926 are available for download, and hundreds of thousands of modern books can be borrowed through our Open Library and Archive.org sites. Some of our digitized books are only available to the print disabled.

Wayback Machine
The Internet Archive is home to the Wayback Machine, a searchable digital archive of the public web. The collection contains more than 475 billion web pages and counting and is an invaluable resource for journalists, academics, researchers, activists, students, and the general public alike. The average lifecycle of a webpage before it is edited or removed is 100 days – our goal is to ensure web resiliency and preserve our cultural memory now and for future generations to come. More than 550,000 Wayback Machine users are served per day.

Community Webs
Community Webs is a program that educates and empowers local librarians to digitally capture and preserve their communities’ historical records. More than ever, the lives of communities are documented online. The web remains a vital resource for traditionally under-represented groups to write and share about their lives and experiences. Preserving this web-published material allows libraries to build more expansive, inclusive, and community-oriented archival collections. This program exists in more than 150 libraries thanks to generous funding by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. With additional funding, we hope to expand the program to more locations around the US and Canada highlighting the vast amounts of untold or underrepresented stories, voices, and perspectives.

We operate in partnership with education, library, and museum partners around the world to archive and catalogue data via our scanning centers to digitize information that is not currently available to the wider world. We also run the "Wayback Machine" that catalogues the internet and provides a historical search function to find captures of websites and other ephemera that might not be available any longer.

We have created and continue to improve the "Wayback Machine" which is hosted at archive.org. We also have scanning centers around the globe working to digitize information of all sorts (i.e. textbooks, musical scores, catalogues, medical papers, etc) and work in close partnership with Open Library to make all public domain information available to anyone with an internet connection.

In 2020 we grew from 40M to 65M public media items, including texts, images, videos, and audio files. Right now, we’re storing over 70 petabytes of data (equivalent to the contents of 186M filing cabinets) and serve more than 1.5M visitors daily. The Wayback Machine has grown rapidly, too; right now there are 475B web pages archived inside it, and we’re capturing another 750M pages every single day! We made a number of improvements to our systems to handle this growth—this past fall, we installed a fiber optic connection at our headquarters in San Francisco, allowing us to drastically expand our bandwidth in response to increased demand.

As a library, we pay special attention to books, and this was a year to remember. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we launched the temporary National Emergency Library this spring. In the middle of a massive public health crisis, we provided digital access to essential books for students, teachers, library patrons, and quarantined citizens who were cut off from their libraries and schools. Educational professionals everywhere relied on us for access to digital materials, and the National Library of Aruba utilized our resources to provide study resources for thousands of students preparing to take graduation exams while their island was shut down.

This year we also added to and expanded our collections with some fascinating new finds. Last August, the Tytell Typewriter Company donated thousands of manuals, records, books, and even historic machines to be preserved for future generations. Marygrove College, a social-justice oriented liberal arts college that was forced to close last year, donated its entire library to be digitized and shared on the Internet Archive, reopening the stacks last October. And although support for Flash has ended, this past November we launched a Flash browser emulation for hundreds of games, animations, and other cultural artifacts—letting anyone take a trip back in time to the early 2000s.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The Internet Archive is one of the top 300 websites in the world and serves more than 1.5 million patrons each day, providing access to 70 petabytes of data—books, web pages, music, television, and software—and working with thousands of partners globally including more than 800 library and university partners to save copies of their work into special collections and create a digital library, accessible to all. As with most libraries, we value the privacy of our patrons, so we avoid keeping the IP (Internet Protocol) addresses of our readers and offer our site in https (secure) protocol.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

INTERNET ARCHIVE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

INTERNET ARCHIVE

Board of directors
as of 5/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Brewster Kahle

Internet Archive

Brewster Kahle

Internet Archive

Rick Prelinger

Internet Archive

Kathleen Burch

Internet Archive

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/18/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data