PLATINUM2024

POLLINATOR PARTNERSHIP

Protect their Lives. Preserve Ours.

San Francisco, CA   |  www.pollinator.org

Mission

Pollinator Partnership's mission is to protect pollinators, critical to food and ecosystems, through conservation, education, and research. Signature initiatives include the NAPPC (http://pollinator.org/nappc.htm) (North American Pollinator Protection Campaign), National Pollinator Week(https://www.pollinator.org/pollinator-week) , and the Ecoregional Planting Guides (http://pollinator.org/guides.htm), Bee Friendly Farming (https://www.pollinator.org/bff), and Monarch Wings Across America (https://www.pollinator.org/monarch).

Ruling year info

1998

Executive Director

Kelly Bills

Main address

600 Montgomery Street STE 440

San Francisco, CA 94111 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Coevolution Institute

EIN

94-3283967

NTEE code info

Other Services (D60)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Pollinator Partnership is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization and the largest in the world dedicated exclusively to the protection and promotion of pollinators and their ecosystems.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign (NAPPC)

P2 manages NAPPC, North American Pollinator Protection Campaign (NAPPC), a growing, private-public collaboration of more than 120 diverse partners, with scientists, researchers, conservationists, government officials and stakeholder representatives working for over a decade to support the health of pollinating animals and the plants and habitat that they support. More information about NAPPC is available athttp://www.nappc.org(http://www.nappc.org/) .

Population(s) Served
Adults

Bee Friendly Gardening (BFG) helps people play a bigger role in the health of pollinators and the planet. More than 85% of U.S. households have an outdoor living space; by converting these areas to much-needed habitat, together we can have a big impact. Your space can provide support to pollinators and other wildlife - no lawn, garden, balcony, or window box is too small!
By joining the Bee Friendly Gardening Member community, you are connecting to a larger network of Bee Friendly Farming Certified producers, supporting farmers, and building recognition for the good work they are doing for our pollinators. The Bee Friendly programs help farmers and gardeners incorporate affordable, simple, science-based guidelines, like offering nutrition and habitat for bees and implementing integrated pest management strategies. Bee Friendly Gardening Members are an essential part of keeping our pollinators healthy and food supply abundant.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our goal is to support teachers, administrators, guardians, youth groups, after school programs, amongst others, in guiding students through adiscovery process that will increase students’ understanding in science, math, and language arts by connecting them to plants, pollinators, food, and gardens by (potentially) creating habitat for pollinators. We say "potentially” because building a school habitat garden requires a real commitment.  Planting the garden habitat is relatively easy, but making it grow, thrive, and survive several seasons is a commitment and a challenge.
We believe that getting children outside and into the garden is the most valuable part of this experience. But we are also realistic and we urge you to be, too.
More than anything, we want you to use the Bee Smart™ School Garden Kit to help expose your students to new ideas about food, wildlife, and plants. It should also help students choose behaviors that support their own health, the health of the planet, and all its plants and animals. And we want the experience to be one that gives you fun, easy, and effective tools to teach and support your curriculum objectives.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The mysterious disappearance of bees, called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), is a growing threat to Honey Bees, the mainstay of pollination services in agriculture. The North American Pollinator Protection Campaign (NAPPC), a tri-national coalition dedicated to promoting the health of all pollinators partners with different organizations to perform research for improving the health of honey bees and reversing the threats they face. The Honey Bee Health Improvement Project focuses on ways to help Honey Bees and beekeepers. In the absence of Colony Collapse Disorder, this task force will seek out and secure funding for innovative and important work to understand and promote genetic stock improvements, understand and promote best management practices for commercial beekeeping, and promote forage opportunities for colonies on public and private land. Click here (http://pollinator.org/PDFs/OPERAReport.pdf) to read the latest compendium from the OPERA Research Center on the latest bee health in Europe.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The U.S. Bee Buffer Project is looking for farmers, ranchers and orchardists in Ohio to take part in creating a foraging habitat of pollen and nectar sources — a Bee Buffer zone — small plots of land dedicated to honey bee health.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Ten years ago the U.S. Senate's unanimous approval and designation of a week in June as "National Pollinator Week" marked a necessary step toward addressing the urgent issue of declining pollinator populations.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Bee Friendly Farming is an online, self-certification program created by Kathy Kellison and other experts (Sam Droege, Mace Vaughn, Dennis vanEnglesdorp, Marla Spivak, Randy Oliver, Robbin Thorp, Karen Strickler, Gerry Miller, Jeff Anderson, Phil Giles, and Gene Brandi).

Population(s) Served
Adults

The number of monarchs making the annual migration has plummeted in recent years, but Ohioans have stepped forward in unprecedented numbers to make a difference. Support for monarchs starts with one thing that everyone can do: plant for monarchs!

Population(s) Served
Adults

Honey bees living near corn fields can have multiple routes of exposure to pesticides. Exposure may be by contact (dust, soil), by ingestion (pollen/nectar/water), or a combination of these exposure routes. The focus of this discussion is exposure via dust from the planting of treated corn seeds.
Corn planting throughout the U.S. and Canada typically occurs from late April to early May when the fields are sufficiently dry to enter with equipment. Corn seeds currently in use by farmers are very frequently treated with pesticide(s). Under humid conditions, treated seeds may become sticky and require a lubricant/fluency agent to move effectively through pneumatic planting equipment; talc and/or graphite are frequently used as seed flow lubricants in the larger pneumatic planters to ensure uniform seed drop. Abrasion of treated seed coatings can result in particles containing pesticide residues mixing with the fluency agents to produce a contaminated “dust” (aka fugitive dust), which can be released by the air exhaust system during planting or subsequent cleaning of the equipment. This “dust” has the potential to be deposited on soil, water, and flowers within and adjacent to corn fields where foraging honey bees, and other pollinators, may be exposed to the pesticide(s).
In 2008, a large number of honey bee colonies in Germany were affected by the drift of dust generated through the abrasion of treated seed during planting. Since that time there has been concern regarding the extent to which one class of pesticides, i.e., neonicotinoid insecticides, can move off-site and represent a route of exposure for bees foraging in the vicinity of fields where neonicotinoid-treated seeds have been planted. Although the incident in Germany was attributed to a combination of factors (i.e., lack of a suitable sticking agent for the pesticide on the seed, seeding equipment that vents upward, dry windy conditions and an abundance of oilseed rape (canola) in full bloom immediately adjacent to the fields being planted), subsequent research (Krupke et al. 2012; Tapparo et al. 2012) has indicated that fugitive dust may still represent a route of exposure even where suitable sticking agents are used and seeding equipment vents downward.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The BeeMD is a diagnostic tool to help beekeepers identify honey bee health issues. The BeeMD will be used in multiple modalities including computers and handheld devices such as tablets and smart phones. The information on The BeeMD will be continually evolving and updated as science and technology add new information to the ability to diagnose and understand hive health.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our ecoregional planting guides, Selecting Plants for Pollinators, are tailored to specific areas of the United States. You can find out which ecoregion you live in and get your free guide by entering your zip code below.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of projects showing an upward trend in the number of conservation actions at site

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Monarch Wings Across America

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The following metrics include combined accomplishments from four NFWF funded grants taking place from 2016-2021: 210 projects received habit enhancement materials.

Acres of natural habitat restored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Monarch Wings Across America

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The following metrics include combined accomplishments from four NFWF funded grants taking place from 2016-2023: 170,000 acres have been secured with agreements to enhance or maintain habitat.

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Monarch Wings Across America

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteers are trained in proper seed collection protocols and plant ID, while technical guidance is provided to land managers and owners, among others.

Acres of land managed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Bee Friendly Farming

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We now have 373,000 acres of certified farmland, 88,000 habitat acres managed through the program, and 750 farms registered. BFF certified growers provide essential resources for pollinators.

Number of list subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Pollinator Action Team- P2s mass email subscription list of followers has grown to 25,654 total contacts.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

P2's Facebook has grown to 67,686 followers with a steady monthly increase and P2s Instagram has grown to 27,500 followers and is one of P2s most popular accounts.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Pollinator Partnership's mission is to promote the health of pollinators, critical to food and ecosystems, through conservation, education, and research.

Signature initiatives include the NAPPC (North American Pollinator Protection Campaign), National Pollinator Week, and the Ecoregional Planting Guides. Our values are as follows:

Science Driven: programs and decisions have their foundation in science.
Inclusive: includes diverse stakeholders and pollinators and considers a variety of perspectives.
Collaborative: authentic and respectful partners, focused on amplifying collective actions and not duplicating efforts.
Productive: resolving problems by identifying issue-drivers and proactively building incremental, practical progress to support sustainable change.
Ethical: honest, principled, and transparent actions; employees and partners are respected and empowered.

We work with a diverse set of partners including local, regional, and national governments; corporations; universities and others that are making exceptional pollinator protection happen across North America and beyond.

Over the last 26 years, P2 has created change through outreach, education, conservation, and scientific research. In June 2016, The White House Pollinator Health Task Force published the Pollinator Partnership Action Plan, which demonstrates successful public-private partnerships working to benefit pollinators. Increased public-private collaboration means the goals set forth to reduce honey bee overwintering colony loss, increase the population of the monarch butterfly, and restore 7 million acres of pollinator habitat can be reached. We've recruited hundreds of volunteers to collect and distribute native seeds to habitat projects across the country. Together, we are changing the future and challenging all sectors of our economy to work together.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

POLLINATOR PARTNERSHIP
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

POLLINATOR PARTNERSHIP

Board of directors
as of 02/09/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Terry Witzel

No affiliation


Board co-chair

Martin Rosen

Laurie Davies Adams

Pollinator Partnership

Martin Rosen

No affiliation

James L. Bennington

Ron M. Bitner

Steve Shestag

Megan Denver

Terry Witzel

Steven P. Quarles

Kevin Butt

Toyota Motor North America

Jared Ficker

Taylor Hall

Kyle Lybarger

Lucky Williams

Dave White

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/25/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data