Human Services

SACRAMENTO FOOD BANK & FAMILY SERVICES

aka Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services

Sacramento, CA

Mission

Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services is dedicated to assisting those in need by alleviating their immediate pain and problems and moving them toward self sufficiency and financial independence.

Ruling Year

1946

President/CEO

Blake Young

Main Address

3333 Third Avenue

Sacramento, CA 95817 USA

Keywords

Sacramento

EIN

94-3315566

 Number

5519894601

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

Hunger and food insecurity permeate every county across the U.S. and Sacramento County is no exception. Many of our neighbors are unsure where their next healthy meal is coming from, many of them young children or retired seniors living on fixed incomes. Food insecurity hovers around 240,000 members in Sacramento County and the number isn't getting any smaller. Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services (SFBFS) aims to close the feeding gap by reaching those who are food insecure and providing them with fresh, nutritious food while also providing them with resources to make healthy meals for their families. SFBFS is committed to serving individuals and families in need by alleviating their immediate pain and problems and moving them towards self-sufficiency and financial independence.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Food Bank Services

Clothing

Parent Education

Adult Education

Youth Education

Immigration Legal Services

Refugee Resettlement Services

SMUD EnergyHELP Services

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of volunteers

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Pounds of food distributed

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Food Bank Services

Number of visits to Adult Education programs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults

Related program

Adult Education

Context notes

Includes visits to ESL, GED, technology, and citizenship classes.

Number of visits to Youth Education programs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Infants to preschool (under age 5),

K-12 (5-19 years)

Related program

Youth Education

Context notes

Includes visits to Playcare Academy and After School Academy.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

Approximately 20% of those living in Sacramento County are food insecure with over 88,000 of those being children. SFBFS hopes to meet the immediate needs of those we serve while also offering education in order to move families to self-sufficiency. This is accomplished through our 14 programs and services which include: Adult Education, CalFresh, Health & Nutrition, Food for Seniors, No Student Left Hungry, Immigration Legal Services, and much more. SFBFS aims to make food accessible to all while also providing resources and knowledge to others who share the vision of making Sacramento County the most food secure community in the United States.

To end hunger and food insecurity, Sacramento must come together as a community to educate and advocate for ourselves and our neighbors. For the past few decades, Sacramento County held an unusual role as the only county in the U.S. that did not have a singular food bank where families in need and agencies could turn to for support. In December 2014, SFBFS stepped up to fill this role and lead Sacramento to a more food secure community. SFBFS partners with 220 Partner Agencies to distribute food, clothing and resources to 140,000 people every month. With the goal of closing the feeding gap and addressing food access challenges on the community level, SFBFS created Neighborhood Food Access Networks (NFANs) which are made up of Partner Agencies from all over Sacramento County. Divided into 11 NFANs that reflect communities based on food insecurity data and community-level challenges, the Partner Agencies meet every month to work through goals and projects that are aimed at maximizing collaboration among the food pantries to improve community impact. Goals Include: establishing standardized best practices, synchronizing food distribution schedules to meet community needs and developing a comprehensive outreach strategy.

Founded in 1976, SFBFS has been serving the Sacramento community for more than 40 years. SFBFS currently operates two large facilities, a multi-level Education & Technology Center with a Demonstration Garden in Oak Park known as the Family Services campus and a large Distribution Center in North Sacramento known as Food Bank campus.

SFBFS serves neighborhoods with families experiencing some of the highest rates of poverty, unemployment, child abuse and neglect, malnourishment and overall hardship in Sacramento County. Over four decades, the number of programs and services offered by SFBFS grew from food and clothing to include adult education, child development, and technology. Most recently, economic trends and developments caused SFBFS to modify service delivery and in 2008, SFBFS began distributing groceries in a mobile format to reach families in need.

SFBFS runs a very lean, grassroots organization with an incredibly efficient, professional staff of 86 and a volunteer workforce of close to 10,000 annually. SFBFS continues to meet the increasing demands for services by leveraging donations when purchasing food, baby supplies and reading material for pennies on the dollar. SFBFS provides goods and services at no cost due to the generous support of donors, through individuals and company contributions.

Currently, there are over 240,000 people food insecure in Sacramento County. While SFBFS and our Partner Agencies reach 135,000 individuals each month through food distributions, there are still over 100,000 that we are not reaching. With 24 million pounds of food distributed in 2017, SFBFS aims to close the gap by reaching all those in need and providing the necessary food supplies and resources they need for their families. SFBFS is working on expanding our reach each year and distributing more food to more people throughout the county.

SFBFS also measures our progress by looking at the number of people we can support through our education classes. With 3,548 visits to GED tutoring and 2,226 Technology Lab visits in 2017, SFBFS is looking to provide the community with necessary tools to improve their situation through education and career building skills.

When SFBFS was founded in 1976, the goal was to provide immediate care for those who were hungry in Sacramento's neighborhood of Oak Park. Through the years, SFBFS expanded its mission to provide care for the whole person through our 14 programs and services. SFBFS help people on their journey to self-sufficiency throughout the years and now aims to end hunger in Sacramento by being a resource for both the community as well as local legislators and advocates.

External Reviews

Financials

SACRAMENTO FOOD BANK & FAMILY SERVICES

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

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  • Forms 990 for 2016, 2015 and 2014
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2016, 2015 and 2014
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Not Applicable

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Not Applicable

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Not Applicable

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Not Applicable

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable