Stand.earth

A world where respect for people and the environment comes first.

aka formerly know as ForestEthics   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.stand.earth

Mission

Founded in 2000, Stand (formerly ForestEthics) is a nonprofit environmental organization operating in Canada and the United States. Our mission is to create a world where respect for people and the environment comes first. We're doing that by challenging corporations and governments to treat people and the environment with respect — because all our lives depend on it.

Ruling year info

2000

Executive Director

Mr. Todd Paglia

Deputy Director, Campaigns and Communications

Mrs. Tzeporah Berman

Main address

548 Market St, #74196

San Francisco, CA 94104 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

ForestEthics

EIN

94-3331587

NTEE code info

Forest Conservation (C36)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Stand.earth (Stand) is an advocacy organization whose mission is to challenge corporations and governments to treat people and the environment with respect because our lives depend on it. Stand fulfills its mission by protecting rainforests, fighting dirty, outdated fossil fuel projects, and by addressing the destructive environmental impacts of industries with critical blind spots in their commitments to stabilize our climate: logging, oil, shipping and fashion. Forest destruction, dirty energy projects, and air and water pollution affect our health and well-being, as well as our collective future. And they do so by disproportionately impacting working class communities and communities of color. At Stand, the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental protection, is a core value of ours - and something we support in word and deed.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Deforestation

Stand.earth confronts and transforms the purchasing policies and practices of major US corporations. We have directly influenced new corporate standards that have shifted millions of dollars away from destructive logging practices and catalyzed legislated protection of endangered forests in North and South America. Following successes with 3M, Disney, and other Fortune 500 companies, we continue to transform corporate paper policies but our work does not stop with a corporate policy announcement. We work in the marketplace to implement the forest-friendly polices we have negotiated, and we push new corporate partners to continue strengthening their purchasing policies to leverage conservation on the ground.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our aim is to stop destruction before it starts. Focusing on tar sands oil and fracked shale, Stand.earth’s fossil fuel campaigns work to defeat existing and proposed transportation infrastructure like oil trains and pipelines.

On North America’s Pacific coast, we are in the midst of a public outreach campaign to defeat Kinder Morgan’s proposed Trans Mountain pipeline, a project that would increase coastal tanker traffic by 700%, with a capacity exceeding the Keystone XL. Pipelines like these threaten ecologically and economically important marine habitats along the entire Pacific Coast and present serious health and safety risks to communities – they are also critical chokepoints in the fight to stop the consumption of dirty and outdated fuels.

Through the development of our Crude Awakening Network, which counts more than 275 organizations as members, Stand.earth has developed a powerful tool to fight against Big Oil’s strategy of isolating communities and pushing through new projects before the citizens even know what’s being proposed. Our network brings communities to share knowledge and strategies, and to begin pushing toward clean energy solutions – and delivers big wins to communities and our climate.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

In 2017, we launched a campaign to transform the climate impact of the rogue and unregulated cruise and shipping industry. Our #DirtyShips campaign focuses on Carnival—the world’s largest cruise company, and one that has increased its climate pollution by nearly 20% over the last decade. Behind the scenes, we are working to shift the environmental standards of the whole shipping industry, which is on track to be responsible for 17% of global greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 if left unchecked.

In addition, Our #FilthyFashion campaign takes the fashion industry head on. U.S. and European brands are fond of making corporate climate commitments, but the majority do not take into account one of their biggest sources of climate and other pollution: manufacturing. This campaign highlights what we do best; leveraging the brand vulnerability of the apparel industry—particularly denim brands manufacturing in China—to hold these companies accountable for their carbon pollution.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of national media pieces on the topic

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are the number of times our organization or members received media coverage and had a piece written about us/them

Number of acres of land protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since 1999 Stand.eath has protected over 65 million acres of wilderness

number of companies whose environmental practices and policies have been significantly improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This list may not be complete and is subject to updating.

Number of audience members willing to take action on behalf of a specific issue

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of people who took action on one of our issues

Total number of audience members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Extreme Oil: to keep some of the world’s dirtiest, most volatile, and health-threatening oil out of our communities, off our waterways and rail lines, and in the ground, while planning a just transition to a clean energy economy.

Healthy Forests: to legislate and implement ecosystem-based management forest protection agreements in the Canadian Boreal Forest; and catalyze breakthroughs in purchasing policies of branded companies to reduce purchasing of unsustainably-harvested forest products.

Dirty Ships: to reduce the climate and marine impacts of the global shipping industry and achieve zero air emissions by 2050 – with a key milestone being a ban on use of heavy fuel oil in the Arctic.

Filthy Fashion: to protect the climate by persuading apparel companies (beginning with denim) to reduce climate pollution in their supply chains.

In all of our campaigns—whether we’re fighting the logging industry or Big Oil or trying to transform the coffee cup—we are engaging in David vs. Goliath battles that seem impossible given our limited resources of time, people, and money. We fight these battles with optimism, by identifying points of leverage (e.g. power of people, power of marketplace, power of media) and by forming strategic alliances with grassroots groups and environmental allies. Time and again, across campaigns, one lessons keeps holding true: when we stand together, we win.

For more info, head here: https://www.stand.earth/about/mission

As a result of Stand’s pioneering market base/supply chain strategy, we have transformed the purchasing practices of some of the biggest buyers of forest products including Staples, Office Depot, major players in the catalog industry like Limited Brands and Williams-Sonoma, and lumber giants Lowe’s and Home Depot. Our ability to transform adversaries into allies and collaborate with industries, local communities, and governments has catalyzed agreements to protect more than 65 million acres in Chile, Ontario’s Boreal forest, British Columbia’s Inland Temperate Rainforest, and the Great Bear Rainforest.

Since our founding, we began to replicate our successful strategies in the energy sector given the emergence of another threat to forests, and more broadly, to our climate: Alberta’s Tar Sands. Recently, we expanded our focus to address two industries with critical blind spots in their commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions: shipping and fashion.

• Our #BetterCup campaign forged a coalition that persuaded Starbucks to commit $10 million to satisfy our campaign’s demand that they shift to a fully recyclable cup. Months later, McDonald’s followed suit with a $5 million commitment to help solve this problem of single-use coffee cups.

• Our #FilthyFashion campaign succeeded in getting a “meet or beat” commitment from one of the biggest brands in the world: Levi’s. This is one of the most important developments in the history of this industry and a 180-degree shift by Levi’s. They have committed to a 90% reduction of GHGs by 2025 in owned facilities, and a 40% reduction of GHGs by 2025 in their entire supply chain.

• In partnership with First Nations allies, we catalyzed one of the most recent movements around fossil fuels: the fight to stop the Kinder Morgan Pipeline. After years of organizing, the Federal Court of Appeal overturned federal permits for the project, delaying construction for the foreseeable future.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Stand.earth
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Stand.earth

Board of directors
as of 4/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Andrea Leebron-Clay

Clay for Earth Foundation


Board co-chair

Rev. angel Kyodo williams

Center for Transformative Change

Stuart Sender

Balcony Films

angel williams

Center for Transformative Change

Michael Uehara

Coastal Shellfish Corporation

James Clay

Clay for Earth Foundation

Andrea Leebron-Clay

Clay for Earth Foundation

Steve Brinn

Raptor Group

Jay Julius

former Chair, Lummi Nation

Becky Parker

Blueprint Brand Strategy

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/21/2020,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/15/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.